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March 07, 2008 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-03-07

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With first postseason win since 2004, a new
era of success for women's hoops Sports, page 8

Ferrell shoots an airball in latest
predictable comedy Arts,page5

IE 1Eidigan DaiIy
ONE H UN1DD(EH TE E Y SI F EIIALFREEDOM

Friday, March 7,2008

michigandaily.com

ONE-HOUR ARTWORK

MICHIGAN DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY
State, party leaders
debate primary plans

Ne
Coul
rac4
You
get a
selves
cratic
remain
decide
on Jan
In
record
18- to

w state contest young Michigan voters went to
the polls in considerably smaller
d play key role in numbers than in other states.
f Just 14 percent of registered 18-
e for nomination to 29-year-old voters voted in
Michigan. In contrast, the same
By JULIE ROWE demographic in New Hampshire
Daily StaffReporter voted at a 43 percent rate.
The Democratic Party stripped
ng voters in Michigan may Michigan of its delegates for
chance to redeem them- moving its primary forward, vio-
if the race for the Demo- lating Democratic Committee
presidential nomination rules. Ever since the Democratic
ns tight and state officials Party's decision made the voting
to redo the primary held results moot, party officials have
.15. been discussing ways to make the
a primary season with voices of Michigan voters heard.
-breaking turnout from The options include hosting
29-year-olds nationwide, a "do-over" nominating contest

or simply allowing the state's
delegates to participate in the
convention as they are current-
ly allotted. If a new contest is
held, college students could play
a decisive role, as they have in
other states.
Negotiations between state
officials and Democratic National
Committee officials have intensi-
fied since Tuesday, when Hillary
Clinton's victories in the Ohio
and Texas primaries tightened
the race.
Barack Obama currently leads
Clinton 1,360 delegates to 1,220,
according to The Associated
Press.
See DELEGATES, Page 3

MAKING MICHIGAN COUNT
There are several plans that could give Michigan voters a voice, and any could have an impact on the close Democratic race.

If the delegates are awarded based on theJan. 15 primary...
1s00 KEY:
1400 73 Clinton delegates
55 Orconmired
1300 - delegates
1200 Hillary Clinton would
get the delegates she
1100 won and the remaining
delegates could decide
1000 whom to support.
"I think it would be a grave
disservice to the voters of
Florida and Michigan to
adopt any process that would
disenfranchise anyone."

1500
1400 -
1300
1200
nov
1100
10001

If Michigan holds a new nominating contest...
KEY:
128 delegates up
for grabs
All28 delegates
would be assigned
based on the results
of a new contest.
likely a caucus.
I certainly want to
make sure that we've got
Michigan and Florida
delegates at the convention
in some fashion."
sOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gene Pendon, an artist from Montreal, painted this mural in just one hour yesterday at the Michigan Union. He was pa
an event called "Art-t-Fakts, (Her) Story 2," which focused on bridging societal gaps through art.

UNIVERSITY LITIGATION
Former law prof
claims anti-gay
bias influenced
tenure decision

M IHI SI N ASSEMBLY
MSA to propose plan for new
streetlights in near-campus area

Judge yet to decide
whether case will go
before ajury
By LINDY STEVENS
DailyStaffReporter
LANSING - In a hearing yester-
day, attorneys representing Peter
Hammer - a former University
Law professor who claims he was
denied tenure by the University
because he is openly gay, argued
that certain faculty members who
voted against Hammer receiving
tenure held biases against his sex-
ual orientation.
Hammer filed the lawsuit in
2005, three years after the Univer-
sity of Michigan Law School denied
him tenure. He is now a tenured
law professor at Wayne State Uni-
versity.
Hammer claims that the Law
School unfairly denied him the
opportunity to challenge its tenure
decision and that he was denied
tenure because he is openly gay.
Lansing Circuit Court Judge
James Giddings, who is presid-
ing over the case, confirmed Mon-
day that Hammer's claim of being
W denied the chance to challenge his
tenure decision would go to a jury
trial. Giddings hasn't yet ruled on
whether Hammer's sexual discrim-
ination claim will also be heard

Property owners
would have to help
cover the project's
$10,000 price tag
By JAKE HOLMES
Daily StaffRepor ter
As he walked along East Uni-
versity Avenue away from central
campus, LSA senior Andrew Pres-
ton said he agreed with a Michi-
gan Student Assembly initiative to
improve lighting near campus.
"It's a good idea," Preston said.
"Someone got mugged here the
other day."
He was referringto a Feb. 19 rob-
bery that took place near the inter-

section of Arch Street and Packard
Street. A man claiming to have a
knife mugged a 22-year-oldman
outside of an apartment building
on Packard Street.
The intersection of East Uni-
versity Avenue, Arch Street and
Tappan Street - known as "The
Triangle" because of the intersec-
tion's shape - is the focus of an
MSA plan to install new street-
lights. The area is currently dimly
lit at night.
MSA decided to tackle off-cam-
pus lighting after receiving student
complaints. In January of 2006,
assembly members began an annu-
al "safety walk" through campus
with Department of Public Safety
officials.
MSA President Mohammad Dar
See LIGHTING, Page 3

ARE YOU AFRAID OF THE DARK?
The Michigan Student Assembly has proposed adding new streetlights near campus.
KEY:- hoMSs 4 '
Site of MS Ns
proposed
streetlights N

before a jury.
Phillip Green, Hammer's attor-
ney, took aim at specific faculty
members to show that professors
who voted against Hammer may
have done so because of his sexual
orientation.
Richard Seryak, an attorney
representing the University, said
Hammer's claims were unfounded
and that the case didn't deserve to
go to trial.
"The Law School provided more
special accommodation for this
candidate than for anyone else in
the history of the Law School and at
the end of the day, this decision was
based on his scholarship," Seryak
said.
Before being denied tenure by
an 18-14 vote in 2002, Hammer
was given a two-year extension to
improve his scholarship after an
initial faculty review of his perfor-
mance.
Green argued that Hammer
deserved a trial because at least
three of the tenure votes that went
against Hammer should have been
thrown out. Green and his client
said they have reason to believe that
at least seven faculty members who
voted in the decision held anti-gay
sentiments.
One such member was Law Prof.
William Miller. Green described
Miller's book "Digust," where the
author used two men kissing as an
example of something disgusting.
See LAWSUIT, page 7

CAMPAIGN 2008
Once the spoiler, Nader no longer seen as a threat

Insi(
abil
With
wage a:
preside
cans all
iar yet p
face ha
up to N(
On,
and for
Ralph P
cy in th
runnin
Muc
forms,I

ders doubt Nader's paign aims to end corporate control
over government, combatcorporate
ity to impact race greed in the U.S. and reach out to
those voters who feel alienated
By GABE RIVIN from the political process.
Daily StaffReporter But eight years after Al Gore's
narrow presidential election loss to
sthe Democrats continuingto George Bush in 2000 - a loss that
n internal war to select their many blamed on Nader, then run-
ntial candidate and Republi- ning on the Green Party ticket, for
but settled on theirs, a famil- having taken votes away from Gore
potentially damaging political - many Democrats at the Universi-
s emerged in the race leading ty are still upset with the corporate
ovember's general election. crusader's decision to run that year.
Feb. 24, political activist "He gave the election to Bush,"
rmer presidential candidate said LSA sophomore Tom Duvall,
Nader declared his candida- chair ofStudents for Barack Obama.
.e 2008 presidential election, ,"That's a pretty strong opinion
g as an independent. among Democrats."
h like his previous plat- Duvall said he also doubted
Nader said his current cam- See NADER, Page 3

Ralph Nader announced last month that he plans to run for president as an inde-
pendent, reprising his 2000 run on the Green Party ticket.

WEATHER HI: 25
TOMORROW - LO 11

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INDEX NEWS ............. ................2 CROSSWORD .................6
Vol. CXVIl,No.108 OPINION............................4 CLASSIFIEDS...................6
@2008 The MichiganoDaily ARTS.................................5 SPORTS................................8
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