100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 06, 2008 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2008-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


2A - Thursday, March 6, 2008

N eW7s The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

4

HOW IS THE STREET VAL UE OF MARIJUANA DETERM
The price of green

The City of Ann Arbor might
have some of the most lax pot laws
around, but when local police
recover the drug, it's the federal
government that determines its
value.
The United States Drug
Enforcement Agency puts a $1,000
price tag on one pound of mari-
juana, but according to Michigan
state police Lt. Garth Burnside,
who heads the Narcotics Enforce-
ment Team in Washtenaw County,
this figure doesn't account for the
range of qualities - or prices - in
the marijuana market.
To determine an approximate
street value of drugs, the DEA
keeps a record of drug busts that
occur throughout the country.
Published in a report known as
"Trends in Trafficking," the DEA
takes into account the price,
quantity and quality of drugs con-
fiscated in the busts.

Burnside that while it's dif-
ficult to gauge a market with so
many factors, the $1,000 figure
for a pound of marijuana seemed
appropriate.
Department of Public Safety
spokeswoman Diane Brown said
these dollars values have no legal
significance. Instead, they're
meant to give ordinary citizens an
idea of drug recovery values made
by the police.'
Like most products, the price of
pot relies on the classic economic
mechanism ofsupply and demand.
With drug raids like the seizure of
375 pounds of marijuana in Ypsi-
lanti earlier this week, Burnside
and other drug enforcers hope to
create a shortage in the market,
thus boosting prices and lowering
consumption.
"It's like buying a candy bar,"
Burnside said. "If you buy one in
the store today, the price mightbe

The value of marijuana given in police reports is deter-
mined by United States Drug Enforcement Agency, which
tracks the price and quantity of drugs confiscated by police
nationwide.

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES'

Backpack
reported stolen
WHERE: Michigan Union
WHEN: Tuesday at about 9
a.m.
WHAT: A student filed a
report with the Department
of Public Safety after her
backpack was stolen from the
ballroom area of the build-
ing on Jan. 19, DPS reported.
The Eddie Bauer backpack
contained two cell phones, an
iPod and a pair of sweatpants.
Police have no suspects.
Tresspassers
found in CCRB
WHERE: Central Campus Rec-
reation Building
WHEN: Tuesday at about 8
p.m.
WHAT: Two men, unaffili-
ated with the University, were
arrested for trespassing, DPS
reported.When'tonfronted by
staff members, who suspected
they snuck in without paying,

the men refused to leave the
building. They were arrested
and released.
Truck strikes
parked car
WHERE: Michigan Union
WHEN: Tuesday at about 3:15-
p.m.
WHAT: A vendor backed into a
car parked in the loading dock,
DPS reported. Both vehicles
sustained minor damage, but no
one was hurt in the accident.
Light pole near
dorm damaged
WHERE: Mary Markley Resi-
dence Hall
WHEN: Tuesday at about 9
a.m-.
WHAT: A light pole near the
building's entrance was dam-
aged, DPS reported. Police have
no suspects. The damages will
cost about $325 to repair.

Lectue on WH ERE: Room 4, Mid
on League
graphic design Pnptrv ql am

higan

different if it's on sale tomorrow."
The Lieutenant also noted that
a drug's price can change signifi-
cantly based on location.
A University student who
wished to remain anonymous said
he regularly travels to Detroit to
buy marijuana because it's cheap-
er there.
"I would pay 50 or 60 bucks for
an eighth (of an ounce) of Chronic
in Ann Arbor, butI could get a full
ounce of the same stuff for 80 to
100 bucks in Detroit."
The self-described "marijuana
enthusiast" said the DEAs esti-
mate of $1,000 seemed reason-
able, but that $1,500 was more
realistic. He said he thinks that
police intentionally place a lower
value on a drug to make others
who dabble in the market ques-
tion the higher prices they might
be paying to dealers.
LINDYSTEVENS
TH REE TH INGS YOU
SHOULD KNOW TODAY
The last day to withdraw
from a LSA course this term
is Friday. To drop or add a
class students must obtain the
instructor's permission and
turnthe appropriate forms into
LSA's Academic Advising Cen-
ter by 4 p.m. on Friday.
Although as many as three
graveyards display a grave
marker for Blues musician
Robert Johnson, he is actu-
ally buried at the Little Zion
Missionary Baptist Church in
Greenville, Miss.
>"FOR MORE, SEE THE B-SIDE
Researchers at the Wash-
ington-based think tank,
Urban Institute, have
implicated the iPod as the
reason behind the nationwide
rise in crime from 2005 to
2006. The institute claims that
the pricey electronic devices
fueled an "iCrime Wave."

Che lrtchfaan soat-t
420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREWGROSSMAN DAVIDGOH
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-647-3336 734-764-0558
grossman@michigandaily.com goh@michigandaily.com
CONTACT INFORMATION
Newsroom ofcehours:Sun.-Thurs.11a.m.-2a.m.
. 734-763-2459
News Tips newa@ointhigandaily~com
Corrections correctiona@ichigandaity.co
Letters tothe Editor tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Photography Department photo@michigandaily.com
734-764-0s63
ArtsSection artspage@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page opinion@michigandaily.com
734-763-0379
Sports Section sports@michigandaily.com
Display Sales display@michigandaily.com
734-764-0ss4
Classified Sales classified@michigandaiy.com
Online Sales onlineads@michigandaiy.com
734-61s-013s
Finance finance@michigandaily.com
EDITORIAL STAFF
Gabe Nelson ManagingEditor nelson@michigandaily.com
Chris Herring ManagingNewsEditor herring@michigandaiy.com
NEWSEDITORS:Emily Barton,KellyFraser,LisaHaidostian,AndyKroll
GaryGraca EdinoialPaeEEdio r graca@michigandaiy.com
EmilyMichels,ArikiaMillikan,KatePeabody,MatthewTrecha
Nate Sandals ManagingSports Editor sandals@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: H. Jose Bosch, Dan Feldman,
Mark Giannotto, Courtney Ratkowiak, Ian Robinson
SPORTS NIGHT EDITORS: NicoleAuerbach, Michael Eisenstei,
RuthLincoln, Chris Meszaros, Andy Reid, Colt Rosensweig
Chrslaerig Managing Arts Editor gaerig@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATEARoTSEDITOS:Mat , arolion Harta, Mica asan,
RodrgoGaya ManagingPhoto Editor gaya@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE OTOnEDITORS Jeremy h,achary Meisne
AnSSANTP Hoo DORSBenDell, RobRMigain ,il teeder, ShaySpaniola
AlisonGhaman Managing Design Editor ghaman@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE DESIGN EDITORS: Bridget O'Donnell, Hillary Ruffe
Bridget O'Donnell Managing OnlineEditorodonnell@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ONLINE EDITORS:TomHaynes
Jessica Vosgerchian Magazine Editoravosgerchian@michigandaily.com
PeterSchottentets MoltimediaEditor schottenfels@michigandaily.com
Katherine Mitchell copychief mitchkl@umich.edu
ASSOCIATE COPY CHIEF: Zenaida Rivera
Paul Johnson Public Editor publiceditor@umich.edu
BUSINESS STAFF
David Dai Display AdvertisingSales Manager
DISPLAY ADVERTISING SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER: Charles Hsieh
DISPLAY ADVERTISING ASSISTANT MANAGER: Michae Schrotenboer
David Reile Classified Sales Manager
CLASSIFIEDSALESASSISTANTMANAGER:ElainaBugli
Hailey Swartz online Sales Manager
Rob Abb Layout Manager
Chelsea Hoard ProductionManager
Margaret Lim Finance Manager
FINANCE ASSISTANT MANAGER: Daniel Cheung
The Michigan Daily IsSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall andwnter
termbtudetsatotheUers ityofichan One cpyisaailbleeeocaetoallreades.
Additol copiemaybe pikedanpat th Daihy'offietfor$2.Subciptionsforalltermntartingin
September,viaU.S.malare$110.winter term lanuarythrough April)is$1syearlong(September
through AprlSis $195.University affiliates are subject toa reduced subscription rate On-campus
sbsciptinfrlalltrmaet5.Sbciptonsmut beprepaid.The Michigantailyisamemberof
TheAssoiated PrssadTherAssoated Cllneite Pres,

WHAT: A lecture by graphic
designer and author Chip
Kidd. Kidd is the art director
at Alfred A. Knopf and has
designed more than 2,000
book covers.
WHO: AGIA Detroit, School
of Art and Design
WHEN: Today at 5 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Theater
"Clemency"
film screening
WHAT: A screening of Art
and Women's Studies Prof.
Carol Jacobson's documen-
tary "Clemency," about bat-
tered women in Michigan
prisons
WHO: University Unions
Arts and Programs Women's
Forum, The P-Word and the
Women's Clemency Project
WHEN: Today at 7 p.m.

WHAT: A poetry slam open
to the public. Admission is $3..
WHO: University Unions
Arts and Programs
WHEN: Today from 8:30 to
11 p.m.
WHERE: U-Club, Michigan
Union
CORRECTIONS
0 An article in yesterday's
edition of the Daily (LSA
scraps plan to regulate distri-
bution ofstudenr media), said
the editorial board of The
Michigan Daily sent a letter
to Bob Johnston, the direc-
tor of LSA's Facilities and
Operations office, urging the
college revise or drop the
new distribution policy. The
letter was sent by the Daily's
senior editors.
* Please report any error in
the Daily to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

lo

F U

EHJI 1SY UNON
* at-* o, onv*
MAYRAAISHOW TO
39 MAKE YOUR BASH A SUCCESS

0

S

Every New Graduate nurse hired
between now and September 1, 2008
receives an Pod touch.

" Academic Medical Center
- Student loan forgiveness
of up to $10,000
- Graduate Nurse Residency Program

For detoitsgo to iww.umkkedu/-uuniom
Cickon FOOD& DINING and then CATERING.
(iconMEETING& EVENT PLANNING end imen EVENTSERVICES.

life works here.
DARTMOUTH-HITCHCOCK MEDICAL CENTER
Lebanon New Hampshire

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan