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February 12, 2008 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2008-02-12

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Tuesday, February 12, 2008 - 7

EDUCATION
From Page 1
Cynthia Wilbanks, the Univer-
sity's vice president of govern-
ment relations, said the University
is actively giving feedback to law-
makers about the bill.
"We continue to be fully
engaged," Wilbanks said. "We
are not reluctant at all to share
with policy makers the provisions
that we like and the provisions
we find challenging and ways in
which we'd want to have them
changed."
Margaret Rodriguez, senior
associate director in the Universi-
ty's Office of Financial Aid, said in
an e-mail message that efforts to
increase federal funding for Pell
Grant awards will help low- and
1 middle- income students.
"Legislative efforts that
increase federal grants for the
neediest students and increase
access to higher education are
good," Rodriguez said.
A full Pell scholarship pro-
vides a maximum of $4,310 for the
2007-2008 school year. The pro-
vision would call for significant
increases to that number.
LANGUAGE
From Page 1
Mary Lambert, an LSA sopho-
more, said she struggled through
a Spanish class last year and
had no idea she could receive an
exemption.
"Last year I was at office
hours all the time," Lambert
said. "And this year, I don't think
my professor even knew the test
existed."
Jeffery Harrold, chair of the
Quantitative Reasoning Com-
mittee and a member of the
Academic Standards Board, said
students shouldn't rush to take
the exam after a disappointing
quiz score.
He suggested that struggling
students seek help from their
professors or graduate student
instructors.
But when that's not enough, he

An amendmenttothebillwould
eliminate the need for families
to fill out the i27-question Free
Application for Federal Student
Aid form by allowingtaxpayers to
have their income and asset infor-
mation compiled by the IRS and
sent directlyto the Department of
Education.
"In general, I think people
are looking for opportunities to
streamline the process of student
financial aid," Wilbanks said.
The provision, she said,
attempts to make it easier for stu-
dents to apply for financial aid.
The act will also require
schools to provide students with
the expected cost of completing a
degree, including tuition and fees.
An amendment made by House
Republicans that would have pre-
vented illegal immigrants from
receiving federal student aid was
not added to the bill.
The Senate passed its version of
a renewal bill last July. Both ver-
sions will be reviewed in a joint
conference between House and
Senate members until both houses
can agree on a version of the bill. A
consensus will need to be reached
by March 31, when the current
Higher Education Act expires.
said, sitting down with an aca-
demic adviser and determining
candidacy for a language waiver
is the next step.
"Once they've talked to the
instructor about what's happen-
ing in that class, the first person
I tell them to talk to is their aca-
demic adviser," Harrold said.
Chalmers Knight, the chair
of the Foreign Language Waiver
Committee, said the process is
holistic and that the committee
tries to assess each case on its
own merits.
"We give everyone due process
and we are quite diligent about
being fair to both students and
the college," Knight said.
Cathleen Conway-Perrin,
director of the Academic Stan-
dards Board, said"students who
think they might have a learning
disability should seek help at the
University's Office of Services for
Students with Disabilities.

LAWSUIT
From Page 1
of West Virginia when the suit
was filed in an attempt to move
the case back to the state level. He
said he dropped that investigation
because of the judge's announce-
ment yesterday.
"With the judge's decision that
the university is an agent of the
state, it became irrelevant where
he lived at the time of suit," Wake-
field said.
Although there is no time
frame for proceeding with the
suit in state court, Wakefield said
he would try to resolve the case
before a state judge as soon as
possible.
Athletic Department spokes-
man Bruce Madej and Marvin
Robon, an attorney representing
Rodriguez, could not be reached
for comment yesterday.
Although Rodriguez signed
a letter of intent to coach at the
University of Michigan nearly two
months ago that included salary
figures, potential contract length
and incentives information, he has
yet to sign a contract with the Uni-
versity.

Distracted drivers drawing concern

Exp
coil
d
DET
never
tempti
off the
the wh
Talk
ing tex
has alr
states.
likenin
ing roo
cars in
tion sy
tainme
Som
their c-
gations
ers anc
printer
Stat
New Y

erts say gadgets while riding in a cab in Miami --
the driver was watching a boxing
ild be as risky as match on a television mounted on
the dashboard.
Srunk driving "I can understand a monitor in
the rear, but up front it is a differ-
By BILL VLASIC ent world," said Marcellino, who
The New York Times sponsored a bill last year to ban all
"display generating devices" in the
'ROIT -- Drivers have driver's view.
had so many distractions New York already has a law
ng them to take their eyes against TV sets in the front seat.
road and their hands off "The driver shouldn't be doing
eel. anything other than driving,"
ing on cell phones and typ- Marcellino said.
Kt messages while driving Motorists have always engaged
eady led to bans in many in risky behavior, whether it is
But now auto companies, eating a sandwich, arguing with a
g their latest models to liv- spouse, applying makeup or study-
ms on the road, are turning ing a map while speeding down
to cocoons of communica- the interstate.
stems and high-tech enter- Safety experts say the influx
nt. of electronics is turning cars
e drivers are even packing into sometimes chaotic -- and
ar interiors with GPS navi- distracting -- moving family
screens, portable DVD play- rooms.
d computer keyboards and The National Highway Traffic
s. Safety Administration estimates
e Sen. Carl L. Marcellino of that 80 percent of vehicle crashes
ork learned this firsthand and 65 percent of close calls are

caused in part by driver distrac-
tion.
And some tragic accidents have
drawn further attention to the
dangers.
In June, five teenage girls
were driving to a vacation home
in upstate New York when their
sport utility vehicle crashed head-
on into a tractor-trailer, killing all
of them.
Police later learned from phone
records that the driver had been
typing text messages on her phone
just before she swerved out of
her lane. Toxicology tests ruled
out alcohol and drugs as possible
causes.
The rise in distraction-related
accidents is chilling to auto-safety
advocates who typically study air
bags and rollovers.
"If we don't do something about
it, you're looking at a situation that
could rival drunk driving as a risk
factor in crashes," said Clarence
M. Ditlow, executive director of
the Center for Auto Safety, a con-
sumer advocacy group based in
Washington.

WATER
From Page 1
water.
Implementation of a bill pack-
age, "Great Lakes, Great Michi-
gan," would keep large-scale
water users like the University in
check.
The bill also seeks to ratify leg-
islation that prohibits most sales
of Great Lakes basin water to
other states and nations.
Under the new legislation,
for example, a bottling company
would need to obtain a permit
before extracting hundreds of
thousands of gallons of water
from certain areas. Permits would
then be reviewed in a "public
comment period," during which
residents of the area could voice
any objections before sending the
permit request to the Department
of Environmental Equality for

approval.
LSA freshman Seth Soderborg,
Warren's employee, said because
the University would have to
more closely monitor its water
usage, students living in residence
halls might have higher room and
board costs if the bill passes.
"If you live in the dorms, this
is obviously going to affect your
housing costs and your living
costs," he said.
The bill package has already
been passed in Illinois and Min-
nesota, and Warren said it's "days
away" from being passed in Indi-
ana.
Though she strongly supports
the bill herself, Warren acknowl-
edged that some aren't as optimis-
tic.
"There is some opposition to
the movement of these bills -
those that would like to get their
hands on Michigan's water and
claim private ownership on what

is a public resource," she said.
opponents of the bill argue that
it could hurt economic develop-
ment and levy administrative
fees on an already depressed state
economy.
But Warren said these costs
would be offset by the conserva-
tion of tourism, Michigan's sec-
ond-strongest industry.
Since fresh water is a relatively
scarce resource, Warren said, it's
especially important that states
monitor how they use it.
"Water is invaluable - there's
no way you can put a price on it,"
said Christy McGillivray, a panel
member and representative of
the nonprofit group Clean Water
Action. "But multi-national cor-
porations will try to do that. You
can't underestimate that incen-
tive."
- Charles Clinton
contributed to this report.

WANT TO
JOIN THE
NEWS
STAFF?
E-mail herring@
m ichiga ndaily.
corn

the michigan daily
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ERM LEASE! 1315 Shee-
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715 W Madison - Great 2 bedroom
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TREE CITY PROPERTIES
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6 Bdrm: 1108 Prospect $3600 Fall
4 Bdrm: 812 Packard $2400 May
5 Bdrm: 915 Greenwood $2375 May
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2-PROFESSOR FAMILY seeks expe-
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ter, 3-4 hours 3X/week. Burns Park, 1
mile south of Central Campus. E-mail
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BABYSITTER FOR OCCAS-
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$10/hr. Email terribrod63@aol.com

SPRING BREAK 08: Sunsplash
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441 S. First - 3 bedroom apartments
steps from Downtown with huge clos-
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1019 Arbordale - One bedroom in a
great, quiet location with free heat!
Rent $580/mo.

140 Hill - $1,810
310 Beakes - $1,725
1407 Morton - $2,400
FIVE BEDROOMS:
704 Hill - $3,250
816 Packard - $3,255
1130 S. Forest - $3,145
1302 S. Forest - $2,275

Wilson White Management 1307 S. Forest - $2,450
734.995.9200 or
www.wilsonwhitemanagement.com SIX BEDROOMS:
MAY-LEASES - Studio to 2 bdrm. 1307 $ Stole - $2,850
apts. on central or north campus. 741-
9300. annarborapartments.net SEVEN BEDROOMS:
MAY/FALL 2008. 4 bdrm, 2 baths, 1814 Geddes - $3,950
parking, washer/dryer. 1117 South For-
est. $2400/mo. Call 734-996-1991. EIGHTBEDROOMS:
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Call today to see your new home! HOUSES (FROM 3
Efficiencies: ROOMS)
726 S. State- only 1 left! 339 Third --$1,850
610 S. Forest 510 Miller - $1,655
344 5. Division 720 W. Washington - $
1 Bedrooms: 337 Third - $2,100
515 E. Lawrence-only 1 left! 337 Trd -$,0
326 B. Madison 509 Detroit - $3,250
511 E. Hoover 802 E. Kingsley - $3,6
2 Bedrooms: 1307 S. State - $5,500
1330 N. University Ct.-only 1 left!
1021 Vaughn Street 734.995.92
411 High- only 1 left! www.wilsonwhiem
* Fully Furnished apartments * Parking
Included * Free Ethernet * Free heat
and water (* At most locations)

0

:
5
3TO

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NEED AN ATTORNEY?
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OFFICE ASSISTANT: AT least a 3.8
high school GPA, age 18 or older, job
experience(s) extra-curricular activi-
ties, computer skills. Very flexible
hours. $12/hour. Part-time position.
Send resume to flexskills@yahoo.com
SCOREKEEPER'S SPORTS
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hardworking individuals for our wait
staff, floorman, and cooks. No experi-
ence necessary. Apply in person at310
Maynard St., Ann Arbor. 734-995-0100.
SEEKING AN EXPERIENCED
Graphic Artist. Send resume and portfo-
lio to ron@capsnaps.com
UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS
Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover
shoppers needed to judge retail and
dining establishments. Exp. Not req.
Call 800-722-4791.
WOLVERINESNEEDJOBS.COM
Paid survey takers needed in A2.
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WORK ON MACKINAC Island this
Season - Make life long friends. The
Island House Hotel and Ryba's Fudge
Shops are looking for seasonal help in
all areas: Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait
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CAMP COUNSELORS NEEDED for
great overnight camps in the Pocono
Mtns. of PA. Gain valuable experience
while working with children in the out-
doors. Teach/assist with athletics,
swimming, A.C., drama, yoga, archery,
gymnastics, scrapbooking, ropes
course, nature, and much more. Office
& Nanny positions also available.
Apply on-line at:
www.pineforestcamp.com

For Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2008
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
Stay off your high horse today. Be
careful with others. The Moon is in your
sign, and you feel unusually frisky and
emotional!
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You will be best served today if you
carve out a little solitude for yourself
Go somewhere alone. Linger ever a sec-
ond cup of coffe. Take a drive or go for
a walk if you can.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Be patient with friends today. You
might be tempted to tell someone to take
a long walk off a short pier. And vice
versa; everyone is chomping at the bit.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
This is a poor day to stand up to par-
ents, teachers, bosses and authority fig-
ures. You will have the courage to do so;
however, they will bite right back. "Talk
to the hand!"
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Try something different today. Go
someplace you've never been before.
You want to learn something new, and
you want some adventure! (Be a tourist
in your own city.)
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
[his is a good day to tackle mundane
details related to insurance matters,
inheritances, estates, shared property,
debt and taxes. Boring, but necessary.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
The Moon today opposes your sign.
This could be why you think that other
people are opposing you. It's not a big
deal. Just smile and be extra patient.

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Put out extra energy to get better
organized both athome and at work. Buy
the right tools or supplies to do a good
job. Improve your life in some way
today.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22to Dec 21)
This is a playful, fun-loving day for
your sign. If you can play hooky, do so.
Sports, playful activities with children
and romance are exciting, on-the-edge
pastimes.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Be patient with family members today.
You're very keen to accomplish some-
thing. You've got big ideas. However,
others might not agree. Bide your time.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb, 18)
This is a busy, chatty day. It's a good
day to run errands and take care of minor
tasks. Time spent with siblings will be
interesting. Be tolerant and patient.
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Don't be impulsive when it comes to
spending money today. Give everything
a sober second thought.
YOU BORN TODAY You're a com-
plicated individual. You have many sides
to you. You're a natural leader, in part
because you know how to skillfully
bring together opposing views. You have
many talents, but your protective con-
cern for others is almost a healing influ-
ence. People like you. Youryear ahead is
full of fun, social times. Many of you
will marry.
Birthdate of: Abraham Lincoln, U.S.
president; Charles Darwin,
naturalist/evolutionist; Judy Blume,
author.

IN-HOME CHILD care needed Feb.
26-29 for 2 toddlers. $10/hr experience
and references required 944-2468.

OLD WEST SIDE/DOWN Town
area Large 2 BR available Fall 2008.
For more information call 734-668-
1100.
3 BEDROOM TRI-LEVEL HOUSE
with study! This beautiful home fea-
tures 1.5 baths., hardwood floors, lg.
kitchen & carport. 741-9300.
annarborapartments.net
4 BDRM. BI-LEVEL near athletic
campus. Fully furn., heat, water, and
parking included. 741-9300.
annarborapartments.net

4 BEDROOM APARTMENT @ 624
Church, perfect for 6 people. Great Lo-
cation, lots of space. Call Old Town
Realty @663-8989 or visit
www.oldtownrealty.net
337 AND 339 Third Street - two great
houses! One has 3 bedrooms and the
other 4. Each has 1 bath and the loca-
tion on 3rd can't be beat; close to
Downtown and close enough to walk to
Campus in a few minutes. Wilson
White Management 734.995.9200 or
www.wilsonwhitemanagement.com

!!!BARTENDING!!! $300 /day poten-
tial, Age 18+ ok. No exp. necessary,
training provided. 800-965-6520 x 125.
ALL STUDENTS
$14.25 base-appt, flex scheds, condi-
tions exist, call 734-973-7024, or visit
www.workforstudents.com

2008 King eatures syndicate. inc.

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