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February 08, 2008 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

CLASSES
From Page 1
smaller companies where they can
stand out."
Schox said today's students are
more interested in learninghow to
obtain start-up funding and learn-
ing what it takes to build their own
companies from the ground up.
His course, and another engi-
neering course on venture capital-
ism being taught this semester, are
geared toward students with more
definedbusiness goals.
The College of Engineering
is also offering a semester-long
entrepreneurship seminar, which
features guest speakers who give
advice to students about their own
successes and failures in the world
of entrepreneurship.
One of the seminar's speakers
- University alum Brian Balasia,
who started the Detroit-based
information technology com-
pany Digerati Solutions when
he was 18 years old - served as
motivation for students in the
course.
Balasia, who is now 26, said
Digerati works with companies

to help them improve the effi-
ciency of their business operations
and human resources programs,
among others.
Both LSA junior David Yen and
Engineering junior Alex Was said
Balasia was the best speaker in the
series so far.
Yen and Was, who plan to launch
their ownweb-based company in a
few weeks, said they could relate
to the struggles of trying to bal-
ance a business and schoolwork
- something Balasia chronicled in
his speech.
Yen said he liked the structure
of the class because it has given
him a chance to learn from entre-
preneurs who have real-world
experience.
He said the University should
expand its entrepreneurship train-
ing programs.
"U of M does a great job mak-
ing students attractive to poten-
tial employers, but it doesn't teach
you how to think outside the box
to start your own ventures," Yen
said.
Engineering Prof. Thomas Zur-
buchen, who coordinated the three
new entrepreneurship classes in
the College of Engineering, said

the seminar was also designed to
help young entrepreneurs connect
with one another.
Zurbuchen said he initially
wanted to limit the entrepreneur-
ship class enrollment to 75 stu-
dents.
The Friday afternoon entre-
preneurship lectures now have
more than 250 students in atten-
dance.
Although Zurbuchen joked that
the gourmet catering after each
seminar might be part of the rea-
son students stick around, he said
it was important that students
have a chance to share ideas with
each other.
And while some students may
hope to establish a business rela-
tionship like the one formed by
Google's Page and Brin, Zurbu-
then said the entrepreneurship
classes aren't just for students who
want to someday run Fortune 500
companies.
"The kind of entrepreneurship
that we're talking about isn't just
focused on becoming a CEO or
starting the next Google," Zurbu-
chen said. "It's about changing the
industry and solving the world's
problems."

SPEAKERS Knight-Wallace Fellows in a dis-
cussion separate from the SAFE-
From Page 1 sponsored event that isn't open to
the public, Dalack said.
"Other special-interest groups Mearsheimer said in an inter-
have managed to skew foreign view yesterdaythat he expects peo-
policy, but no lobby has managed ple to disagree with his and Walt's
to divert it as far from what the opinion and looks forward to the
national interest would suggest, debate.
while simultaneously convincing "The idea that there are going
Americans that US interests and to be people in the audience who
those of the other country - in this disagree with us and disagree with
case, Israel - are essentially iden- us vehemently is attractive to us,"
tical," the London Review article Mearsheimersaid."We want people
says. who disagree with us to make their
In the article, Mearsheimer said arguments and give us an opportu-
the Israel lobby is deeply rooted in nity to dealwith them." LSA sopho-
the U.S. political system. more Andrew Dalack, co-chair of
"The special relationship is SAFE, said the group had been in
driven largely by the lobby, and the contact with the authors for nearly
lobby has grown in power since a year trying to solidify a date that
the creation of Israel in 1948," he they could come to campus. He said
wrote. Mearsheimer and Walt were invit-
Students Allied for Freedom and ed because of the thoroughness and
Equality, a pro-Palestinian advoca- quality of their book.
cy group, invited the duo to speak "This book really makes the
on campus, according to LSA soph- Middle Eastern conflict more per-
omore Andrew Dalack, co-chair of sonal to the average American,"
SAFE. Dalack said the professors Dalack said. "What this book does
would speak to students in the Nat- is it links Israel's interests in the
ural Science Auditorium. Middle East to American foreign
Earlier in the day, Mearsheimer policy, and that has a direct impact
and Walt will address Michigan's on Americans here at home."

Friday, February 8, 2008 - 7
Dalack also said he expects the
crowd to-have differing views.
"I think that it will draw out a
very diverse crowd," Dalack said.
"The Israel Lobby and U.S. For-
eign Policy" has been criticized
by some as an anti-Israel and pro-
pagandist book masquerading as a
researched academic work.
Abe Foxman, director of the
Anti-Defamation League, wrote a
book meant to denounce the claims
of "The Israel Lobby and U.S. For-
eign Policy." The book, "The Dead-
liest Lies: The Israel Lobby and
the Myth of Jewish Control" was
one several attempts to refute the
theory, with essays refuting Walt
and Mearsheimer's claims found
in publications such as The New
Republic, Foreign Affairs and The
Washington Post.
Nick Israel, the Midwest cam-
pus coordinator for the Zionist
Organization of America, said
Mearsheimer and Walt shouldn't
be speaking on campus because the
book is not really academic.
"You have people masquerading
an idea that is non-academic," Isra-
el said. ".The book reinforces con-
spiracy theories part of traditional
anti-Semitism."

ECONOMY
From Page 1
full-time jobs, according to Crain's
Detroit Book of Lists.
Bernstein said the real number
is even larger, because Crains's
numbers don't include part-time
positions like residence hall staff
positions or jobs created by the Uni-
versity's construction projects.
Elizabeth Parkinson, the direc-
tor of public relations at Ann Arbor
Spark, a local economic develop-
ment organization, said the draw
of the University community partly
explains why Ann Arbor hasn't suf-

fered as much as other Michigan
cities that are more dependent on
the manufacturing or automotive
industries.
In addition to the jobs created
directly by the University, Parkin-
sonsaidthe presenceofaprestigious
research institution and high-tech
industries like biotechnology help
bring new companies to Ann Arbor.
Even though drug giant Pfizer
relocated out of the city last year
- a move that affected 2,100 work-
ers - Parkinson said she thinks the
Ann Arbor job market will continue
to grow. She said high-tech com-
panies are attracted to Ann Arbor
because the city has many employ-

able college graduates and because
companies can partner with the
University on research projects.
Last year, Spanish aeronautics
firm Grupo Aernnova chose nearby
Pittsfield Township as its North
American headquarters. The firm
will bring more than 400 jobs to the
city, Parkinson said.
Ann Arbor's Google office, which
is located on South Division Street
and opened last year, is expected to
employ more than 1,000 workers by
2012.
Near campus, though, many cam-
pus businesses still display "Help
Wanted" signs in their windows. It
could be because most students are

only able to work part-time.
At the Red Hawk Bar & Grill on
State Street, manager Matt Pietryga
said employing many students on a
part-time basis means the restau-
rant is frequently looking for more
help.
As students's schedules and avail-
ability change with each semester,
Pietryga said, he usually has to hire
more staff.
He said about half of Red Hawk
employees are-University students.
Pietryga said that while he hasn't
seen a drastic difference in job
applications, high unemployment
rates haven't created the stream of
applicants that might be expected.

"We don't have people flying in
the door either," Pietryga said.
The University helps local small
businesses by attracting people to
Ann Arbor, Bernstein said.
He said the families of Univer-
sity employees add to Ann Arbor's
workforce for retail and restaurant
jobs.
"There's probably a larger pool of
people to fill those jobs," Bernstein
said.
Bernstein said he's confident Ann
Arbor's mix of a research University
and high-tech companies will keep
the city out of economic trouble.
"I'm pretty sure that we're going
to stay strong," he said.

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umich.edu

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For Friday, Feb. 8, 2008
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
You feel privately content with the
world today. You might even be happy
and just not know it. (Our state of mind
is totally habitual.)
TAURUS
(April 20to May 20)
This is a wonserful day to schmooze
with others. All dealings with groups,
clubs and organizations will be positive
and expansive. You might travel or talk
to people from other cultures.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
You can make a name for yourself
today. People respect you. People sense
that you have a good heart and respect
for others, and this, in turn, makes them
respect you.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
Travel plans or anything having to do
with education, publishing, the media,
medicine and the law look pretty rosy
today. Your optimism is justified. Dream
big!
LEO
(July 23 toAug. 22)
You might see ways to use the
resources or even the money of others to
benefit yourself and others. It's a good
day for fundraising. It's also a good day
to ask for a loan or a mortgage.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Partnerships are particularly favorable
today. Enter into partnerships or agree-
ments. Sign contracts. Agree upon the
conditions that each party should
respect. It's also a fun day!
LIBRA
(Sept.,23 to Oct. 22).
Co-workers are cooperative today.
This is a good day to make improve-
ments at work orrally the troops to agree

with your ideas.
SCORPIO
(Oct.23 toNov. 21)
Romance looks promising today!
Enjoy playful activities with children.
Take a little vacation, or do anything that
gives you fun and pleasure.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Invitethe gang over. Entertain athome
today. Family discussions are positive
and upbeat. People feel generous to each
other today. (And that's a good thing.)
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
This is a positive, upbeat day for you.
Enjoy dealing with others, especially
siblings and relatives. It's a good day to
sign contracts and enter into agreements
with people.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb. 18)
This is an excellent day for business
and commerce.You're not afraid tolthink
big. Matters related to foreign countries
and travel could figure is.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
The Moon is in your signtoday, bring-
ing you a bit of extra good luck. You
might feel more emotional than usual;
that's OK. Be happy. Your popularity
will really grow this year!
YOU BORN TODAY You have a mar-
velous imagination. You're also
extremely intuitive with highly devel-
oped psychic powers. You are quick to
visualize or grasp concepts. You have an
excellent sense of financial timing.
Personally, yourlife is never predictable.
You tend to respond to whatever is hap-
pening around you. Many of you have
good technical skills. Focus on partner-
ships this year.
Birthdate of John Grisham, author;
Kirk Muller, hockey player/coach;
James Dean, actor.

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2008KngFeatues SyndicaeIn.

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