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November 16, 2007 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-11-16

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EDITOP1

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, November 16,2007

michigandaily.com

STATE OF THE 'U
Coleman
plans for 5
more years
'U' president calls for
interdisciplinary research
program as she embarks
on new term
By GABE NELSON
Daily News Editor
University President Mary Sue Coleman
announced plans to hire 100 new tenure-track fac-
ulty members for interdisciplinary research in an
address at the monthly meeting of the University
Board of Regents yesterday.
The speech, which replaced Coleman's annual
"State of the University" address, summarized Cole-
man's goals for her second term as University presi-
dent. Coleman, who was appointed by the University
Board of Regents in July 2002, finished her first five-
year term in July. She signed a contract in June for a
second term to run until 2012.
The centerpiece of Coleman's goals for her next
See COLEMANPage 3A

A schematic drawing of renovations to Stockwell Hall shows a common area that will replace much of what is now the dorm's dining hall.
Stockwell plans move forward

Regents also approve
addition to
College of Architecture
and Urban Planning ..
By EMILY BARTON
Daily StaffReporter
The University Board of Regents
approved the details for renovations to
Stockwell Residence Hall and an addi-
tion to the Taubman College of Archi-

tecture and Urban Planning yesterday.
According to the schematic designs
approved by the regents, Stockwell will
undergo a $39.6 million renovation that
will add wireless Internet access, new
bathroom facilities and air-condition-
ing. There will be new lounges and a
kitchenette on each floor.
Stockwell was built in 1940 and
named for the first woman admitted to
the University, Madelon Louisa Stock-
well, who was accepted in 1870. It has
historically been an all-female dorm,
but, after the renovation, that could
change.

In response to a question from
University Regent Olivia Maynard
(D-Goodrich) at yesterday's regents
meeting, University President Mary Sue
Coleman said the dorm might not keep
its women-only status. That's because
the dorm is made up of mostly single
rooms, making it potentially attractive
to upperclassmen after the renovation,
said an architect from Goody Clancy
and Associates, the firm that designed
the plans.
The infrastructure will be updated
on the outside as well as the inside. The
outward appearance of the building

will not change.
Two thousand square feet will be
dedicated to an enclosed courtyard
space, where students can meet to study
or socialize. The courtyard will be two
stories overlooking the tennis courts
and Palmer Field. It will be open to all
students in the Hill living area.
The dining hall will be replaced with
a lounge, a laundry room, music prac-
tice rooms and study rooms. Stockwell
residents will eat at the Hill Dining
Center in Mosher-Jordan Residence
Hall, which is slated for completion
See STOCKWELL, Page 3A

University President Mary Sue Coleman laid out some of
her plans for the next five years in a speech to the University
Board of Regents.

RECLAIMING THE ROCK

PLUTO PRESS CONTROVERSY
3 regents call on 'U' press
to drop distribution deals

A
Br
un
an

greement with Press.
The University Press's contract
itish publisher with Pluto has been under fire for
its distribution of "Overcoming
ider attack over Zionism," a book written by Bard
College Prof. Joel Kovel. Some on
ti-Zionist book campus, including the Michigan
chapter of the pro-Israel group
By ANDY KROLL Stand With Us, claimed the book
Daily StaffReporter was anti-Semitic propaganda.
Pluto was originally founded as
letter delivered yesterday a socialist press. It publishes doz-
University of Michigan ens ofleft-wingtitles.
xecutive committee, three University Regent Andrea
rs of the University Board Fischer Newman (R-Ann Arbor)
ents urged the press to end read the letter aloud at yesterday's
tribution agreements with Board of Regents meeting in the
arty publishers, includ- University's Alumni Center.
ndon-based publisher Pluto "We simply assert that the

money which the Press receives
from distributing Pluto press
books is outweighed by the repu-
tational damage to the University
from publishing books over which
the University faculty or staff has
no editorial control," the letter
said.
The letter - co-signed byFisch-
er Newman, Laurence Deitch
(D-Bingham Farms) and Andrew
Richner (R-Grosse Pointe Park)
- respondstothe UniversityPress
executive committee's decision
last month to continue its distri-
bution deal with Pluto.
"Overcoming Zionism" argues
that Zionism has created an apart-
See PRESS, Page 3A

In a
to the
Press e
membe
of Reg
all dist
third-p
ing Lot

LSA senior Gervis Menzies paints the Rock at the corner of Hill Street and Washtenaw Avenue after it had been painted red
with an Ohio State 'O' earlier in the day.
COURSE REGISTRATION
Some cheat before class starts

Police seek culprits in string
of thefts from 'U' vehicles

In some schools,
holding seats is
against the rules
By LINDY STEVENS
For the Daily
With course registration just
over a week away, students are
scrambling to make their dream
schedules.
For students with fewer credits,
those schedules often include class-
es with the most popular meeting
times and professors, which are
likely to fill up before students with

fewer creditsgetashot.Thathasled
some students to ask a student with
an earlier registration appointment
to hold an electronic spot for them
in a crowded class - a tactic that
some schools and colleges at the
University have banned.
Advisers at the College of Engi-
neering, which has a policy against
holding classes, said they're not
concerned about the method,
although some students admit to
taking advantage of the system.
LSA senior Bob Rosenberg, a
political science and American
culture student, said he once asked
an older friend with an earlier reg-
istration date to reserve a seat for

him in History 230, called "History
of College Athletics."
"It was pretty simple," Rosen-
berg said. "He dropped the class
and I picked it up."
That class, taught by Ameri-
can Culture Lecturer John Bacon,
examines America's obsession with
college athletics and the role col-
lege sports have played in Ameri-
can culture. The course holds just
50 students, split into discussion
sections of about eight students,
making it harder for students with
later registration dates to enroll.
While Rosenberg took the class
because "it seemed pretty cool,"
See REGISTRATION, Page 3A

22 instances of theft
from University
vehicles reported
By ELIZABETH LAI
Daily StaffReporter
The University is offering up to
$500 for information about a string
of vehicle break-ins.
Thieves have taken hand power
tools and construction materi-
als from 22 different University

vehicles since July, Department of
Public Safety spokeswoman Diane
Brown said.
A University van has also been
reported stolen, Brown said. Miss-
ing since Oct. 15, it has not been
recovered.
Police think most of the thefts
occurred on the same night,
according to Brown. Nine break-
ins were reported on one night in
August.
Brown said thieves got into
most of the vehicles by breaking
windows or through doors that
have been left unlocked. She said

most of the vehicles broken into
were parked on South Campus. As
a result, University Plant Opera-
tions plans to change the location
of vehicles parked overnight and
revise its key policies.
Brown would not say whether
DPS has any suspects in the case,
and she said police haven't yet
calculated the costs of the dam-
age and stolen property.
Those with information about
the break-ins can call DPS at
734-763-1131 or the University's
anonymous tip line at 800-863-
1355.

TODAY'S H I: 41
WEATHER LO 29

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