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November 14, 2007 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-11-14

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 - 7A

Detroit 2nd in foreclosures FPager

California, Florida
cities rank
high on list
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Home-
owners across the U.S. are increas-
ingly having trouble making their
mortgage payments on time, but
borrowers in metro areas of Cali-
fornia, Florida and other once-
booming housing markets are
accounting for the biggest spikes
in foreclosure filings, according to
a mortgage research company.
An analysis of foreclosure
activity in the nation's largest
100 metropolitan areas during
the three months ended Sept. 30
shows seven cities in California
STADIUM
From Page 1A
to correct the cited violations" or
the department will refer the case
to the U.S. Department of Justice,
which could choose to sue the
University.
University spokeswoman Kelly
Cunningham confirmed that the
University received the letter and
said the University plans to reply
by the deadline.
A resolution between the Uni-
versity and the Office of Civil
Rights seems likely to be particu-
larly difficult, because the orga-
nizations disagree over a crucial
distinction in ADA law.
While the Office of Civil Rights
argues that the stadium fails to
meet ADA requirements based on
the reasoning that the project was
a renovation, the University argues
that the stadium is subject to a less
stringent set of rules because that
project was only a repair.
The University could voluntari-
ly make changes without conced-

and five each in Florida and Ohio
were among the top 25 metro
areas with the highest foreclosure
rates, accordingto the study being
released today by RealtyTrac Inc.
The Irvine-based company cal-
culates its foreclosure rate rank-
ing by comparing the number of
households in a metro area with
the number of foreclosure filings,
which include notices of default,
auction sale notices or bank repos-
sessions.
Stockton, about 83 miles east
of San Francisco, had the highest
foreclosure rate in the third quar-
ter among the top 100 metro areas,
with one foreclosure filing for every
31 households, RealtyTrac said.
Detroit was second, with one
foreclosure filing for every 33
ing that the concrete replacement
was a renovation, but that could
weaken its case in an existing
lawsuit filed against the Univer-
sity by the Michigan Paralyzed
Veterans of America. That group
has argued thatthe University has
made renovations and intends to
make further renovations without
upgrading the facilities to meet
ADA regulations.
Interim University General
Counsel Gloria Hage declined to
comment on the letter, saying it
would be inappropriate to discuss
it before the University officially
responds. Cunningham said the
University remains optimistic
that it can negotiate a solution
despite the office's rejection of the
University's argument.
"We are very hopeful that we're
going to reach a resolution," she
said. "We've always worked to
resolve this issue and that remains
the same."
The disagreement with the
Office of Civil Rights began Oct.
29 when the office sent a letter
ordering the University to bring

households. The Riverside-San
Bernardino metro area, located
about 60 miles east of Los Angeles,
was third, with one filing for every
43 households.
Riverside-San Bernardino also
accounted for the most foreclo-
sure filings in the U.S. during the
quarter, RealtyTrac said.
The housing market slump
has made it harder for financially
strapped homebuyers to sell their
homes and avoid missing pay-
ments or losing their homes in
foreclosure. Increasingly, many
borrowers who took out adjust-
able-rate mortgages and other
loans that potentially adjust to
higher monthly payments after an
initial period are also finding they
can't afford their payments.
the stadium into compliance. The
letter, which described conditions
for disabled fans as inadequate and
often oppressive, also accused the
University of ignoring the office's
requests for information about
construction on the stadium.
The University replied last
week with a letter contesting
the office's argument, arguing
that the replacement of concrete
should be considered a repair
rather than a renovation because
it maintained the original struc-
ture of the bowl. The letter also
defended the accessibility of the
facilities offered to disabled fans
and maintained that the Uni-
versity has accommodated all
requests for information by the
Office of Civil Rights.
Bradshaw said in an interview
that the Office of Civil Rights
still hopes to resolve the situa-
tion without intervention by the
Department of Justice.
"We've invited the University
of Michigan to meet with us to
negotiate a resolution to this case,"
Bradshaw said.

"Most people know my great-
grandfather, Henry Ford, as the
person who created the afford-
able automobile, put the world on
wheels," Ford said. "But Henry
Ford was actually one of the 20th
century's early environmentalists"
Ford said.
Ford reassured his audience of
Ford Motor Company's contin-
ued dedication to contributing to
sustainable transportation. He
addressed the company's growing
efforts to tackle the growingneces-
sity for sustainable transportation.
Ford said the company has
been exploring alternative energy
technologies like hybrids, plug-in
hybrids, hydrogen fuel cells, inter-
nal combustion fuel cells and flex
fuel engines.
Ford said that the public does not
realize the efforts being taken by
auto companies.
"There's this mindset out there
that people in Detroit are a bunch
of Neanderthals," Ford said.
Ford said he was eager to prove
them wrong.
Mary Lemmer, who is co-presi-
dent of the Environmental Issues
Commission in the Michigan Stu-
dent Assembly, said she originally
thought Ford would use the lecture
as a public relations ploy. Her opin-
ion changed over the course of the
speech.
"I was very surprised," she said.
"I mean, I knew that Ford was doing
COMPUTER
From Page 1A
wide.
Jones said he expects Virtual
Sites to help students save money
because they won't have to pur-
chase expensive software programs
that are already installed on campus
computers. He said the University
will save money, too, because fewer

MAX COLLINS/Daily
Bill Ford, the executive chairman of the Ford Motor Company's board of directors,
spoke about sustainability at Rackham Auditorium last night.

stuff, but I thought it was more of a
'green-washing' sort of thingto sort
of green their image."'
But some were less impressed.
John Hassett, a graduate student
at the School of Natural Resources
staff will be needed to maintain the
physical area in which the comput-
ers are set up. The University will
not have to purchase monitors, mice
or keyboards for computers specifi-
cally designated for Virtual Sites.
Ruth Addis, executive director
of ITCS, said faculty will be able to
hold more class sessions that fur-
ther integrate technology without
being ina computer lab.
"This is going to help change

and Environment, said he was dis-
appointed with Ford's evasion of
responsibility.
"He seemed a lot like a commer-
cial at a shareholders' meeting,"
Hassett said.
campus computing," she said.
Jones said there are currently
40 computers on campus reserved
for Virtual Sites users, but only one
remote user can use each computer
at a time.
Jones said that ITCS is looking to
expand the program so more people
can use Virtual Sites simultaneously.
Addis said the creation ofVirtual
Sites won't cause any University
computer labs to close.

ELECTRICITY
From Page 1A
the fish following them use the
same motion to push off of vorti-
ces and propel themselves.
And backers of the technol-
ogy say fish will be one of its
beneficiaries.
John Kerr, director of eco-
nomic development at the
Detroit/Wayne County Port
Authority, said VIVACE said
other hydroelectric technologies
include underwater turbines,
which operate like underwa-
ter windmills and have harmed
fish.
But Kerr said VIVACE won't
do that.
"The worst-case scenario
with these cylinders is that fish
get disoriented for a little bit,"
he said.
VIVACEextracts energy from
the currents in the river, but part
of what makes it groundbreak-
ing is its ability to extract energy
from currents at lower speeds,
unlike other technologies.
According to the Electric
Power Research Institute, tur-
bines and water mills need an
average current speed of 5-7
knots - or about 6-8 miles
per hour - to be financially
viable.
Most currents flow at speeds
of less than three knots. VIVA-
CE allows access to those cur-
rents for energy.
"Currents are a reliable
source of energy," Bernitsas
said. "Waves, solar power and
wind are often unpredictable."
Bernitsas said water is the
largest medium that absorbs
energy, most of which comes
from the sun. If humans could
harness just 0.1 percent of that
energy, he said, it would cover
the needs of 15 billion people.
The device took Bernitsas
and others about three years
to develop and will be used to
power a 20,000-square foot
building on the Detroit River.
Kerr said he expects for the
Detroit River to be a good dem-
onstration site for Bernitsas'
technology because it is deep
and has a relatively strong cur-
rent.
Bernitsas and his team plan
to finish a feasibility study by
the end of this year. As long as
the results are what they expect,
about 18 months will be spent
putting the device in the Detroit
River.
The Detroit/Wayne County
Port Authority is helping fund
the project along with the DTE
Foundation, an electric compa-
ny. In addition to the $400,000
received so far, Bernitsas's com-
pany expects to raise another
$3-5 million in funding.

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For Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2007
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
Brace yourself for surprises when
dealing with bosses, parents, teachers or
any authority figures in your life. You
might like what happens; but if not,
you'll be defiant!
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Unusual or different people will cross
your path today. Some of you will learn
about a different religion or a new way
of thinking. You're definitely more in
touch with the outside world.
GEMINI
(May 21to June 20)
Unexpected news about the resources
of others could occur today. Stay in
touch with unpaid bills and your bank
account. Make sure your phone or elec-
tricity is not threatened.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
Partners and close friends might sur-
prise you today. They might do or say
something quite out of character.
Alternatively, you might meet someone
who is new and different.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Your daily work schedule will be
interrupted today. Fire drills, power out-
ages, computer crashes or staff shortages
are all possibilities.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Surprising flirtations might make you
sit up and take notice. (Who knew?)
Parents should be extra-vigilant with
children. This is a mildly accident-prone
day for them.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
You could have unexpected company,
or surprising events could occur at home
today. Minor breakages might happen.
Take things slowly. Expect the unex-

pected.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You'll meet someone new today who
is interesting. Others will hear surprising
news about siblings or relatives. It's not
a boring day!
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
Impulse buying and spontaneous pur-
chases are likely today. Some of you
could discover ways of making money
independently or earning something on
the side.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You feel excited, independentand a bit
saucy today. You don't want anyone
telling you what to do. (You can do that
very well by yourself, thank you.)
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
You feel a bit restless today. This is
because you're dealing with a situation
over which you have little control. You
feel at the mercy of others, which makes
you very much on your guard.
PSCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Either you will meet someone unusual
today or someone you already know will
do something that surprises you. Either
way, it's interesting. You might join
forces with someone to fight'for reform
or to try to improve things.
YOU BORN TODAY You're' con-
cerned with your surrounding environ-
ment. You care about how things are
evolving. You're happy working behind
the scenes; you don't need the glory. You
understand the dynamics and needs of
society. This is why many of you are in
manufacturing. You'll be happy to know
that the year ahead could be one of the
best years of your life. Dream big!
Birthdate of: Prince Charles, British
royal; Laura San Giacomo, actress; Josh
Duhamel, actor.

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S2007 Ding Features Syndicate. Inc.

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