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November 12, 2007 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-11-12

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Opinion, Page 4A

iGi i

.JEE1)

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, November 12,2007

A LOSS BEFORE A MUST-WIN

Smichigandailycorn
BIG E DRINKING
In anti-alcohol
fight, colleges
get creative

New solutions to an
old problem; at Iowa,
more classes on
Friday mornings
By LISA HAIDOSTIAN
Daily StaffReporter
After years of largely unsuccess-
ful attempts to discourage binge
drinking on campuses around the
country, administrators are look-
ing for more creative ways to keep
students from getting fall-down
drunk.
The University of Iowa is
attempting to throw a wrench in
the "Thirsty Thursday" routine
- the popular practice of starting
weekends a night early - by sched-
uling more classes on Fridays.
Only 14 percent of classes at the
University of Michigan are held on
Fridays, as opposed to 22 percent
on Mondays and Tuesdays and 21
percent on Wednesdays and Thurs-
days.

University spokeswoman Kelly
Cunningham said there are no
plans to schedule more classes on
Fridays because those afternoons
are generally used for other pur-
poses.
"Friday is a day where we have
lots of lectures and public seminars
and interesting things where we
have people come and speak," she
said.
Along with more Friday classes,
some schools are attempting to cut
down on drinking by limiting alco-
hol advertising on campus.
The California State University
system implemented stricter con-
trols on alcohol advertising two
years ago. The system's Fullerton
campus even hired a student to
take down advertisements and fli-
ers that promoted drink specials at
bars on campus.
Taking an even more aggressive
approach, Louisiana State Univer-
sity worked with the Baton Rouge
city council to ban "all-you-can-
drink" specials or big drink spe-
cials after 10 p.m.
See ALCOHOL, Page 7A

Wisconsin tight end Travis Beckum celebrates after scoring the first of four
Badger touchdowns during Saturday's win over Michigan. Wisconsin handed
the Wolverines their first Big Ten loss of the season. Michigan's loss may
have hurt right away, but rival Ohio State also fell just hours later. Because of
that, the two teams are still tied atop the Big Ten standings heading into this
weekend's matchup.

MORE ON THE LOSS
" Loss stings more than players want you to think, Page1B
" Mallett struggles mightily in relief of injured Henne, Page1B
9Jefense regrets wishing for more traditional offenses, Page 4B
0 Despite big play, Manningham struggles, Page 4B

CLASS DAYS
The percentage of classes meeting on different days at the University

How admissions
affect parenthood

NYU prof says
individualized
process can hurt
poor students
By JAKE SMILOVITZ
Daily StaffReporter
The way the nation's most selec-
tive colleges and universities pick
their students has reshaped Ameri-
can society, according to Mitchell
Stevens, an associate sociology
professor at New York University.
In a lecture at the School of Edu-
cation on Friday, Stevens discussed
how privileged parents prepare
their children for the college admis-
sions process from an early age,
giving those children an advantage
when they apply to school.
"The rules of selective college
admissions have become essen-
tially sets of instructions for how
relatively affluent parents are rais-
ing their children," Stevens said in
an interview after the lecture.
Stevens'sbook on the admissions

process, "Creating a Class: College
Admission and the Education of
Elites," details the year and a half
he spent working in the admissions
office of an unnamed New England
liberal arts college. He's also done
other research in the field.
"Admissions decisions have
increasingly been made on the
basis of measurable academic and
extracurricular accomplishment,"
Stevens said. "Relatively privileged
families have organized their chil-
dren's lives to produce measurable
accomplishment, and that has pro-
found consequences for the nature
of inequality in American society."
Stevens highlighted the aca-
demic community's contradictory
demand for both universalism and
individualism. This paradox cen-
ters on the notion that everyone
should have the same opportuni-
ties but that everyone should be
treated as aunique person, too.
Stevens said the accepted solu-
tion to this tension in admissions
is called individualized consider-
ation, which first uses astandard set
of criteria for each applicant before
See ADMISSIONS, Page 7A

soURCE: UNIVERsITY OF MICHIGAN

ALLISON GH AMAN/Daly
ACLU President Nadine Strossen said the war on terrorism has resulted in a massive
erosion of civil liberties.
ACLU president:
Defend the offensive

NYU sociology Prof. Mitchell Stevens told an audience at the School of Education
that the college admission process shapes how some parents raise their children.

A FpREsE FIR EgArR Ms
Tpush gun rights, group offrs a gun voucher

h
is

Libertarians say guns
mean a safer campus
By JAKE SMILOVITZ
Daily StaffReporter
According to LSA sophomore
Eric Plourde, the right to own guns
is "the most attacked civil liberty."
That's why his group, the Universi-
ty chapter of the College Libertar-
ians, is holding a raffle tonight for
a $200 gift certificate toward the
purchase of a gun at the Mill Creek
Sports Center in Dexter, Mich.

Gun control on college cam-
puses became a national issue after
the April Virginia Tech shootings,
which left 33 people dead.
"There's a lot of controversy
because of Virginia Tech," Plourde
said. "People who support gun
control said they (guns) were too
easy to get and people on our side
said that if students had guns, they
could protect themselves."
Plourde is quick to point to
examples of incidents when stu-
dents defended themselves from
assailants through the use of fire-
arms.

"We feel that people are safer
when they can defend themselves,"
Plourde said.
The University's chapter of the
College Libertarians held a similar
event in April of 2006; an alum in
attendance won the gun voucher.
Similar gun giveaways or raffles
have sparked controversies on
other campuses across the country.
Three years ago, at the University
of Illinois, protesters demonstrated
as a conservative political journal
on campus raffled off three guns.
Last year, a conservative news-
paper at Clemson University held

a similar drawing for two rifles,
including an AK-47.
The Libertarian Party's plat-
form argues that governments
often interfere with a citizen's right
to self-defense by passing gun con-
trol laws that are justified as a way
to reduce violence in society.
LSA junior Chris Irvine, chair of
the University chapter of College
Republicans, said the event was not
necessarily something his organi-
zation would do, but he understood
why libertarians would.'
"My initial reaction was that the
See GUN, Page 7A

The
Civil L
that sh(
anyone
even ift
hate.
Nadi
17th an
erson I
Intellec
more th
torium.
Stros

Strossen says accusing the Bush administration
and Congress of allowing a massive
iateful speech erosion of civil liberties.
"In fact, there have been so
still free speech many First Amendment casualties
of the war on terror that the ACLU
By JULIE ROWE recently issued a special report
Daily StaffReporter about them," Strossen said.
She said the government is
president of the American maintaining a "surveillance soci-
iberties Union said Friday ety" by persecuting the press and
e's willing to defend almost intimidating potential government
's right to free speech - whistleblowers.
that speech is being used for "People self-censor, not engag-
ing in expression that might be
ne Strossen delivered the deemed offensive by the powers
nual Davis, Markert, Nick- that be," Strossen said.
Lecture on Academic and Strossen said controversial
tual Freedom to a crowd of speech - including hateful rheto-
can 300 at Honigman Audi- ric - should receive the same pro-
tection from censorship as all other
sen began her lecture by See ACLU, Page 7A

TODAY'S
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INDEX NEWS................................2A ARTS.. . . ..........5A
vol. CXVIIINo.48 SUDOKU........................3A CLASSIFIEDS.. . .A........6A
@ 7 TheMichiganaily OPINION............................4A SPORTSMONDAY................1B

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