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November 09, 2007 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-11-09

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Mechanical music group more than just math rock Arts, Page 5
~Ie i1idigan hug I
ONE )UDR FLED I JEARS 4F ED I DOM
Friday,_November 9, 2007 michigandaily corn
A SIGN OF PROTEST
professor
mulling bid
L.h3 ss r for Czech
presidency

KELLYN JACKSON/Daily
A student stops to look at a poster taped to the east door of Burton Memorial Tower yesterday afternoon. An unknown person posted a grievance about the decline in
underrepresented minority enrollment in this year's freshman class. The writer also drew question marks and the sentences "I'm confused. Where's the diversity?" in
pastel chalk on the wall of the tower.
INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS
After banner yer, U' los ahead

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imess School prof Party, which, with about 45 per-
cent of all seats in the parliament,
stayed involved in is the parliament's largest party.
Svejnar has the support of
iative country the centrist Green Party, which
accounts for about 2.5 percent of
seats in parliament, and the left-
By JULIE ROWE ist Social Democratic Party, which
Daily StaffReporter holds about 30 percent of seats.
Svejnar was motivated to con-
ie February, Ross School of sider running for president by "his
ss Prof. Jan Svejnar could strong desire to help his coun-
leave of try," said his wife, Business Prof.
e to take Katherine Terrell. Svejnar, who
he presi- is currently in the Czech Repub-
of the lie discussing a potential run with
Repub- Czech politicians, could not be
vejnar, a reached for comment.
citizen Terrell said the country's Green
has long Party approached Svejnar about
involved SVEJNAR a month ago to ask if he would be
ech eco- interested in running. The envi-
policy, is ronment-minded Green Party has
ering running for election to opposed Klaus, the incumbent
t. president, because he denied that
ruse the Czech president is humans are responsible for climate
by the parliament. rather change.
y the general public, Svejnar Because the Civic Democratic
oing around shaking hands Party holds 40 of the 81 seats in
ssing babies. Instead, he's the senate, Svejnar would need to
to members of parliament secure every other vote to gain the
rts to build a coalition that majority needed for a victory. That
allow him to win a majority means he needs to win the support
lection. of every other party in order to win
0 parliament members for- the election.
nominate Svejnar, he will Terrell said that could be a
e an official candidate to challenge because the remaining
te against incumbent presi- parties, including the leftist Com-
aclav Klaus in the February munist Party and the conservative
n. Klaus has the support of Christian and Democratic Union,
tht-wing Civic Democratic See PROF, Page 3

Number of Fulbright
winners topped
American colleges
By BETH WITTENSTEIN
For the Daily
Sometimes, being the best isn't
good enough.
Coming off a year when the
University topped all American
colleges in the number of students

winningFulbrightgrants for inter-
national study, University officials
are discussing ways to improve
support services for scholarship
applicants.
At last week's meeting of the
Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs, faculty mem-
bers raised concerns about the
University's methods for recruit-
ing applicants for prestigious post-
undergraduate scholarships - like
the Rhodes and Marshall - and
about the " University's support
services for students applying for

these scholarships.
Although University students
won 37 Fulbright awards this year,
the most in University history and
10 more than Yale, which had the
second-most winners, the Uni-
versity's Fulbright endorsement
process isn't perfect, said Biology
Prof. John Lehman, the chair of
the Academic Affairs Advisory
Committee. The University strug-
gles to give enough attention to
each applicant, Lehman said.
The University's recent Fulbright
success has driven more students

to apply and that has put stress on
University interviewers and schol-
arship advisers, said Gretchen Weir,
the University's assistant vice pro-
vost for academic affairs.
With more than 300 initial
applicants this year, University
faculty members were unable to
interview all the applicants. It was
the first time that had ever hap-
pened, Weir said. The University
eventually chose 119 students.
Lehman said one problem with
the interviewing system is that
See SCHOLARSHIPS, Page 7

Team proposes urban
centerin Detroit 'burbs

'U' group imagined
mass transit-based
community
By ELIZABETH LAI
For the Daily
An urban planning team from
the University is theorizing that
reducing Michigan's historic
dependence on automobiles by

building pedestrian friendly
neighborhoods will help prevent
people from leaving the state.
The group, made up of four
Rackham students and two fac-
ulty members from the Taub-
man College of Architecture
and Urban Planning, proposed
designs for one such neighbor-
hood at a forum last night in Troy,
Mich. They were one of several
groups to propose building a new
urban center around a mass tran-
See TRANSIT, Page 7

Hoops player suspended
for poor class attendance

ALCOHOL LAWS
Bar license
suspended
for hosting
beer pong
Touchdown Cafe says
drinking wasn't
required in tourneys
By ANDREW GROSSMAN
ManagingNewsEditor
The Michigan Liquor Control
Commission has suspended Touch-
down Cafe's liquor license for vio-
lating a rule against sponsoring
drinking games at bars. The bar
held regular beer pong contests.
The suspension starts today and
will run for five days. Touchdown
Cafe will have to pay a $1,600 fine
as well.
State administrative code pro-
hibits bars from holding "any
contest that requires the use or
consumption of alcoholic liquor or
features alcoholic liquor as a prize
in connection with a contest."
Beer pong usually involves two
teams standing across a table from
one another taking turns throwing

LSA junior Sarah Camilloel serves drinks last night at Touchdown Cafe. The Michigan Liquor Control Commission has suspend-
ed the bar's liquor license for five days starting today. The state says the bar violated rules against sponsoring drinking games by
holding beer pong contests.

Smith also suffering
from ankle injury
By DAN FELDMAN
Daily Sports Writer
Junior point guard Jerret
Smith was suspended from the
Michigan men's basketball team
yesterday for breaking the Uni-
versity's class attendance policy
for athletes.
The suspension was supposed
to take place for tonight's sea-

son-opener against Radford, but
Smith injured his ankle in prac-
tice today
within half an
hour of Mich-
igan coach
John Beilein
notifying him
of the suspen-
sion. Beilein
said Smith _
will serve his SMITH
suspension
the first game he's healthy.
"I'm sure he's disappointed,
See HOOPS, Page 7

ping-pong balls into cups partially
filled with beer on their opponents'
side. Every time a team makes a
shot, the other team has to drink
the beer and remove the cup. The
losing team is the one whose cups
are eliminated first.
But Scott Meinke, a manager
at Touchdown Cafe, said the bar's
version of beer pong doesn't neces-
sarily involve beer. He said some
people play with water or don't
drink anything at all.
"At the beginning of the tour-

nament we explain the rules, and
that's one of the rules," he said.
"We explain that this is not a binge
drinking game. It's purely a game
for fun; there doesn't have to be
alcohol involved."
Jason Derisley, a co-owner of the
bar, said he thought his bar was fol-
lowing the rules.
"This is kind of a surprise," he
said. "We did believe that we were
in compliance with all the rules.
We really thought that we were."
According to the Ken Wozniak,

the director of the commission's
executive services division, inves-
tigators saw drinking games being
played at the bar and filed the infor-
mation with the state attorney gen-
eral's office.
The complaint then went
through a series of administrative
hearings and appeals before a cir-
cuit court judge refused to stay the
license suspension on Wednesday.
Derisley said many area bars
host beer pong tournaments.
See PONG, Page 3

TODAY'S H.i47
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