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November 02, 2007 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-11-02

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State Street's Work Gallery gees green
Arts, Page 8
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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, November 2, 2007

michigandaily.com

ADMISSIONS AFTER AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
Minority
enrollment
dips slightly

'U' says numbers
don't reflect full
effects of Prop 2
By EMILY BARTON
Daily StaffReporter
The number of underrepre-
sented minorities dropped in this
year's freshman class, according
to final enrollment data released
yesterday.
The class is the first one select-
ed after Proposal 2 banned the
use of race in University admis-
sions almost a year ago.
Underrepresented minorities
made up about 11 percent of this
year's freshman class, compared
with 12 percent last year. The
number of black students in this
year's freshman class dropped

by 8.8 percent from last year's
class, while Hispanic enroll-
ment dropped by 12.6 percent
and Native American enrollment
dropped by 13.8 percent.
University spokeswoman Kelly
Cunningham said the impact of
Proposal 2 isn't clear yet because
the ban didn't take effect until
January, which was halfway
through the admissions process.
Many applicants were reviewed
using affirmative action.
Cunningham said the Universi-
ty is working to improve outreach
because it's likely that minority
enrollment will continue to drop
based on what happened at other
colleges after their states passed
similar legislation.
"We remain cautiously opti-
mistic to maintain diversity
among our students," she said.
See ENROLLMENT, Page 7

Scott Boerma, the new director of the Michigan Marching Band, used todirect the band at Eastern Michigan University.

MAX COLLINS/Daily

NEW MAN ON THE LADDER

DECLINING MINORITY ENROLLMENT
Percentage of underrepresented minorities in each year's freshman class
20 F

New marching band
director has spent 22
years writing music
By ZOE BAMBERY
Daily StaffReporter
Scott Boerma's life has always revolved
around the steady drumbeat of marching
bands.
Hegrew up watching his father direct
high school marching bands, and fol-
lowed in his coordinated footsteps.

After spending two decades directing
various marching bands - most recently,
the band at Eastern Michigan University
- Boerma now occupies the conductor's
ladder at the Big House on football Satur-
days. It's his first season as the director of
the Michigan Marching Band.
His first experience with the Uni-
versity came while he was pursuing his
masters degree in music at the School of
Music just over 10 years ago.
While at the University, Boerma stud-
ied with Pulitzer Prize-winning compos-
er William Bolcom and wrote a number
of pieces for the marching band. Boerma
is slated to teach courses next semester

irr music education while finishing up
his doctorate in musical arts at Michigan
State University.
After graduating from the University,
Boerma worked as the band director
at Lampshire High School in Madison
Heights, Mich. for four years. He then
directed the Novi High School marching
band for six years.
Boerma said he would be reluctant to
go back into high school band directing
because of its interference with his com-
position.
"Being a public school teacher is all-
consuming," he said. "For a year (after-
See DIRECTOR, Page 7

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MENTAL HEALTH AT THE UNIVERSITY
More students seek help

Officials not sure
why depression
reports are on rise
By ARIKIA MILLIKAN
Daily StaffReporter
University mental health agen-
cies have scrambled in the last
several years to provide treatment
to a rising number of students
seeking psychiatric treatment.
Studies from across the country
have shown a sharp increase in
reports of stress and depression
among college students.
S Todd Sevig, the director of the
University's office of Counseling
and Psychological Services, said
the percentage of students seeking
help from CAPS has increased in

recent years, including by 13 per-
cent from 2006 to 2007.
According to the National Col-
lege Health Assessment, which
surveyed almost 95,000 college
students across the country last
fall, 42.3 percent of participants
reported feeling so depressed last
year that it was difficult to func-
tion; 9.4 percent seriously con-
templated committing suicide.
The University's mental health
agencies have hired additional
staffers and rolled out new ini-
tiatives aimed at maintaining a
healthy campus, all the while ask-
ing themselves a question: Why
are today's students so stressed
and depressed?
Rachel Glick, the director of
adult psychiatry for the Universi-
ty's Psychiatric Emergency Ser-
vice, a mental health service based
See DEPRESSION, Page 7

DEPRESSION
BY THE NUMBERS
Pret42.3
Percent of students last fall who felt "so
depressed that year that it (was) difficult
to function"
9,4
Percent of students last fall who reported
"seriously considering suicide"
Percent increase in students seeking
help from CAPS, the University's Coun-
seling and Psychological Services, since
last year

The new projector at the University's Exhibit Museum of Natural History replaces a system that was so old the museum had
trouble reselling it.
At renovated planetarium,
more realistic star shows

MSA ELECTION CATCH-22
Public policy seat still up in the air

It's unclear whether
assembly can
apportion seats
By DAVE MEKELBURG
Daily News Editor
Despite a Michigan Student
Assembly vote to award a seat to
the Ford School of Public Policy at
Tuesday's meeting, it appears that
the school still might not receive

a seat on the assembly in this
month's election.
Candidate application material
released Wednesday by MSA did
not include applications for a Pub-
lic Policy seat.
MSA's constitution says every
school in the University should
bel represented on the assembly.
But MSA's compiled code says the
apportionment of seats must be
based on the most recent enroll-
ment data from the registrar. The
most recent data the registrar has

is from winter semester, when
the public policy school had no
undergraduate program. Now, it
does.
Although MSA voted on Tues-
day to follow its own constitution
and award the public policy school
a seat, there's some confusion
about whether MSA can reappor-
tion seats on its own.
Election Director Ryan
Bouchard said MSA does not
have the authority to tamper
See MSA, Page 7

Tom
sh
Start
be giver
of light
Way fr
Museun
Geddes.
After

torrow's opening the planetarium will re-open with
a new state-of-the-art digital pro-
ow narrated by jection system and curved walls to
create a more realistic experience
Liam Neeson for visitors.
PlanetariumDirector MattLinke
By JULIE ROWE said the planetarium's old technol-
For the Daily ogy was so outdated that the muse-
umstruggled to sell it. The museum
ing tomorrow, students will raised $100,000 to replace it.
n the chance to fly millions The new Uniview system is an
t-years beyond the Milky improvement over the previous
om a chair in the Exhibit projection system, which used a
n of Natural History on stationary star ball in the center of
Avenue. the room and slide projectors along
'two months of renovations, the four square walls to cast images

of the night sky. The new technol-
ogy features a single digital projec-
tor with a fish-eye lens that fills the
18-foot diameter dome with images
of the cosmos.
Linke called the projection sys-
tem "a very unique presentation
tool with applications we haven't
dreamed of yet."
The switch from projected star
charts to a digital sky will give the
audience an experience more like
pilotinga flight simulator than gaz-
ing up at the night sky.
Linke said when he hosts shows
See PLANETARIUM, Page 7

TODAY'S
WEATHER

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ON THE DAILY BLOGS
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INDEX NEWS....................2 ARTS. .................5
Vol, CXVIIIl, No. 42 SUDOKU.. . . . 3 CLASSIFIEDS............6.........6
2007TheMichianaily OPINION.. . . 4 SPOBTS ................................9

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