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September 05, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

the
Statement
If you've given up on
that career as a social
worker and just want a
yacht named Caviar and
a house in Aspen, here's
how to sell out.

K ckoff
0 7 ~20
Believe it or not, there's
still going to be a
season. Look inside for
the Daily's annual
football preview.

lp 1Midigan BrI

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, September 5, 2007

JI LEE. )

michigandaily.com

FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES
Greeks
launch
hazing
hotline
21 national chapters join
together for effort
By JAKE HOLMES
Daily Staff Reporter
The University's Greek system has a new
tool in the fight against hazing.
Cincinnati-based law firm Manley Burke
has set up a hotline in conjunction with the
national chapters of 21 fraternities and sorori-
ties. People who have seen or experienced haz-
ing can call 1-888-NOTHAZE to file a report.
The firm has received one hazing complaint
since launching the hotline last week, Manley
Burke associate Dan McCarthy said.
The 21 founding organizations represent
about 35 percent of all students in fraternities
and sororities nationwide.
See HOTLINE, Page 7A

OPEN HOUSE

Students meet with University President Mary Sue Coleman during her annual open house yesterday at her house on South University
Avenue. Coleman spoke with students about everything from the responsibilities of running the University to her two cats.

Second in a five-part series
HOW TO SAVE MONEY ON TEXTBOOKS

CAMPAIGN 2008
M ich.,
primary
set for
Jan. 15
Move means Clinton,
Obama, Edwards and other
Democrats likely won't
campaign at the University
By CATHE SHUBERT
Daily StaffReporter
Gov. Jennifer Granholm signed a bill yester-
day moving Michigan's presidential primaries
up to Jan.15.
Allof the Democratic candidates have vowed
not to campaign in Michigan because party
rules prohibit states other than South Caro-
lina, Nevada, New Hampshire and Iowa from
holding nominating contests before Feb. 5. The
Democratic National Committee has threat-
ened to strip Michigan of all of its delegates at
the party's nominating convention if it moved
its primary forward.
Republican candidates have said they
will campaign in Michigan, even though the
Republican National Committee has said that
it will take away half of the state's delegates at
its nominatingconvention.
Several University of Michigan students
working for the Democratic candidates said
they're worried that a Republican-only pri-
mary in Michigan will hurt the Democratic
nominees' chances to win the state in the gen-
eral election.
"If Republicans dump more money and
time into Michigan, people may be more
exposed to those issues and candidates," said
See PRIMARY, Page 7A
Student's
'design lands
on Learjet
Millionaire alum's plane
used to shuttle Coleman,
'U' professors
By EMILY ANGELL
DailyStaffReporter
Art and Design sophomore Katie Kuehl's
artwork will soon be criss-crossing the coun-
try thousands of feet in the air.
Kuehl is the winner of a contest to design
the outside of University alum Richard Rogel's
new Learjet.

Rogel, a wealthy businessman, often lets
University President Mary Sue Coleman and
University professors use his current plane for
free.
Rogel decided to find a University student
to design a maize-and-blue paint job for the
plane. He worked with the School of Art and
Design to hold a design competition.
"I wanted to reward students for their cre-
ativity," Rogel said.
Kuehl's design is reminiscent of the football
See PLANE, Page 7A

Hint: You don't have
to go to Ulrich's and
Shaman Drum
By AMINA FARHA
Daily StaffReporter
The most convenient way to buy
textbooks is to walk into the near-
est campus bookstore and get every-
thing at once.
If you do that, though, you might
end up spending more than you oth-
erwise would. One hundred dollars
for a used copy of "Single Variable
Calculus: Concepts and Contexts"
(Retail price: $149.95)? Not if you
know where to look.
The Student Book Exchange
is often overlooked option. The
exchange, which began in 1989,
operates for four days at the start of
each semester. On the first two days,
students bring in their used text-
books and set their prices. During

the last two days, students come in
to buy textbooks and coursepacks,
and then participants can collect a
check for any books that have been
sold at the end of the sales period.
The sellers get back any books that
aren't sold.
The exchange started yesterday
and runs through Friday in the
Pond Room of the Michigan Union.
Another option for finding cheap
textbooks is buying them online.
There are the larger sellers, such as
half.com, amazon.com or eBay and
the more localized online options,
like marketplace.umich.edu, Face-
book Marketplace and craigslist.
com. The localized sites allow buy-
ers to arrange meetings with the
seller to pick up the textbooks and
thus avoid dealing with the costs
and long wait of shipping.
When buying your textbooks
online, however, there are a few
things to watch out for.
0 Make sure the textbook

Coming tomorrow:
At some universities,
students rent textbooks
.. ... . . .. . . . .. . . . . -... . . .. . . . .... . .. . .. . . ........ . ... .. .
you're purchasing is the correct
edition. Professors usually include
this information in their syl-
labi. If you have the ISBN for the
required book, finding the exact
edition online is as easy as typing
the number into a search box. Also,
remember to check if there are any
extra necessary materials, such as
workbooks or lab manuals, that
might be listed separately from the
textbook.
* When purchasing books online,
it's also important to order early.
Order can take more than a week.
E-mailing your professors and ask-
ing for a copy of the syllabus a few
weeks before class starts will leave
you enough time to find better deals
and receive all of your books before
the start of classes.
See TEXTBOOKS, Page 7A
ged Single Variable Calculus

Campus bookstores are convenient and easy, but there are
cheaper alternatives for students looking to save money.
BOOKS BY THE BUCKS

Mas alld delas palabras, Poems, Poets, Poetry: An Psychology: Themes and
includingworkbook/lab manual introduction and Anthology Variations

40 Studies That Chan
Psychology

www.marketplace.umich edu
Facebook Marketplace
Michigan Union Bookstore

$120.62 + $3.49 shipping $3959+ $3.49 shipping $85.00 + $3.99 shipping $28.00 +$3.49 shipping $84.00 +$3.49 shipping

Not available
$35.00
(Does not include workbook)

Not available
$30.00

$80.00
$70.00

$20.00
$25.00

$70.00
$50.00
$137.15 new, $102.85used

$92.85 new, $69.65 used $60 new, $45 used

$126.35 new, $94.75 used $38.40new, $28.80 used

TODAY'S -H 88
WE ATHER L 60

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ON TREDAILY hOGS
City Council asks state to repeal stem cell ban
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/THEWIRE

INDEX OPINION............
Vol. CXVIII, No. 2 ARTS .....................
O2007 The Michigan Daily CLASSIFIEDS.........
michigandoilyrcom

.........4A SPO RTS.................
. 5A KICKOFF................
....6A THESTATEMENT....

.12A
....1 C

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