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October 22, 2007 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-10-22

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

Monday, October 22, 2007 - 7A

WEBSITE
From page 1A
student academic affairs in LSA,
said students who try to get ahead
by copying the answers to home-
work problems are only hurting
themselves.
"I'm not sure that's giving you an
edge if you're doing that," he said.
He said a study guide is only as
helpful as the effort a student puts
into using it, and that it defeats
the purpose if students are simply
going to the answers without learn-
ing to solve the problems.
"I wouldn't recommend it," he
said. "I don't see the benefit."
Along with textbook solutions,
the website also provides students
with lecture notes and practice
exams as well as forums where
students can ask for help. The site
has a point system in place, called
"Karma Points," that rewards users
for participating on the site - for
example, by submitting solutions
to unsolved textbook problems or
by helping others on the forums.
For 550 Karma Points, Cramster
users can get a $25 Starbucks gift
card. For 5,000, they can get an
iPod, and for 30,000, users can get
a Sony Vaio laptop.
To view the solution sets to
OSCR
From page 1A
and maintaining the educational
focus, and also a balance between
complainants and responding
student rights," Schrage said.
The statement also now requires
OSCR resolution coordinators to
inform students before proceeding
with any hearings that they have
the right to meet with an adviser,
which couldbe aparent, other stu-
dents or a legal adviser.l
The student bringing the com-
plaint must now agree to have
it heard by a student panel. The
accused party previously had the
right to choose whether a student
panel or resolution officer would
hear the complaint.
Holzrichter said this change
was made in part because the old
system made cases of sexual mis-
conduct problematic. A student
accusing another person of sexual
assault, for example, might be too
embarrassed for their case to be
heard before a student panel.
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all problems in a given textbook,
students must pay a fee of $9.95 a
month. Users who don't pay the
monthly fee can only view the
answers to odd problems.
Robert Angarita, president and
co-founder of the site, said Aaron
Hawkey, an alum of the University
of California at Los Angeles, devel-
oped the idea for the site while
he was in college and wanted a
resource to help him with his own
classes.
Hawkey began to gather content,
like practice exams and explana-
tions for problem sets for his own
use. He launched the site in Feb-
ruary 2003, after graduating from
college.
Angarita said student abuse of
the solution sets is a concern. Still,
he said it's up to students to decide
how to use the site.
"We're not there for them on
the midterm," he said. "One of the
things we try to do is replicate the
experience someone would get
studying in a study group."
Prof. Gus Evrard, who teaches
Physics 140, said referencing solu-
tion sets might help a student who's
stuck on a homework problem and
has no other way to get through it.
"I don't see that practice as abu-
sive," he said.
But he said it is unlikely that

students who rely too heavily on
solution manuals and sites like
Cramster will gain a good under-
standing of the material.
"You don't learn physics by
memorizing the solutions to five
thousand physics problems," he
said. "You learn physics by orga-
nizing your thinking through find-
ing answers by yourself."
A statement on the Cramster
website says that whether using
Cramster constitutes cheating
depends strictly on whether the
student's intention is to use it as a
resource to learn or just to copy the
answers.
The site also warns students not
to cheat.
"Please make no mistake: if you
plagiarize a homework solution
from a friend minutes before class
or the night before from Cramster,
you are cheating," the statement
says. "Please don't. We want you
to understand how to do it, be pre-
pared for your exams and succeed
academically!"
Plans to expand Cramster to
include help on biology, economics,
high finance, and business statis-
tics are underway, Angarita said.
He also said the site will also
begin catering to high school stu-
dents by the start of the 2008-2009
school year.

We never heard from them again'

STORIES From page 1A
took the town's Jewish population
to a ghetto.
Later, when they were deciding
who would be killed, they noticed
a red cross on Brysk's father's arm
indicating that he was a physician.
The soldiers pulled Brysk's father
and his family from the line of
those condemned to death.
Two Jewish resistance fighters
rescued Brysk and her family from
the ghetto in December of 1942
and brought them to a forest filled
with Russians and Jews resist-
ing the Nazi occupation, where
Brysk's father helped establish a
hospital.
For the more than two years
that Brysk lived in that forest, she
dressed as a boy to prevent from
being raped. She was given a pistol
as a present on her eighth birthday,
she said.
Russian troops liberated the for-
est in 1944. After that, Brysk's fam-
ily lived in Italy for two years and
then moved to America.
Brysk, a digital artist who focus-
es on works portraying the Holo-
caust, now lives in Ann Arbor near
her two daughters and five grand-
children.
Yesterday's luncheon, spon-
sored by University of Michigan
Hillel's Conference on the Holo-
caust, allowed students to sit at a
table with one or two survivors and
discuss their stories in an intimate
setting.

About 300 people, many of them
University students, attended the
event, as well as about 60 survivors
and 10 children of survivors. Regis-
tration for the event was full, with
as many as 45 people on a waiting
list to attend.
"We had no idea we would have
this big of a turnout," said LSA
junior Carly Wayne, one of the
event's organizers.
Sam Offen, another survivor
who shared his stories, was 18
when life in his hometown of Kra-
kow, Poland changed forever.
"September 1,1939; the dayI will
never forget," he said.
That day, Germany invaded
Poland, enforcing a curfew that
forced Jewish residents to remain
inside their homes for several days.
Shortly afterthe curfew was lift-
ed, people who admitted to being
Jewish were pushed into large
trucks and taken away.
"They took this human cargo
away and we never heard from
them again," he said. "That's how
I lost a lot of relatives."
Offen also described the time he
spent in Plaszow, a labor camp near
Krakow, and then in Mauthausen, a
concentration camp in Austria.
Prisoners were forced to walk in
five columns when moving across
the camp. If one person escaped,
everyone else in the column would
be shot, Offen said.
On Oct. 2, 1942, Offen left his
barracks and saw "hundreds and
hundreds" of corpses lying in the
street.

"They continued the oppres-
sion to the very last day," Offen
said. "Five years, nine months, six
days."
Offen was asked about Iranian
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad,
who has called the Holocaust "a
myth." Offen said he was disheart-
ened by Ahmadinejad's speech at
Columbia University last month.
"It made me feelvery bad," Offen
said. "It reminded me of 1939, and
Hitler."
After survivors finished telling
their stories, they participated in
a Yahrzeit, memorial ceremony
where small groups lit candles to
remember those who died in the
Holocaust.
LSA sophomore Dori Moscow-
itz said the event was important
because there will be a time when
no more Holocaust survivors will
be around to tell their own stories.
"It's important for people our
age to be learning this, because
soon we'll be the ones passing this
on," she said.
As the event came to an end, sev-
eral survivors handed out contact
information to their tables. Miriam
Brysk gave each person at her table
her business card and a hug, prom-
ising they could visit her house to
see her art anytime.
"It is up to you guys to remem-
ber, and to make sure no more
Holocausts go on in this world,"
she said.
- Beth Wittenstein
contributed to this report.

NEWS TIP?
E-mail news@michigandaily.com
or call the newsroom at 734-763-2459.

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For Monday, Oct. 22, 2007
ARIES
(March 21to April 19)
For the next few weeks, shared prop-
ery and insurance mattres are of primary
interest toyou. This is an opportunity for
you to clean up some old business.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Ex-partners are definitely back on the
scene. Look good! Living well is the
best revenge. It could be an opportunity
to settle unfinished business.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Despite the delays and silly errors that
continue at work, you're galvanized into
action now because you want to get bet-
ter organized. Give yourself the right
tools to do a good job.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
The next few weeks the perfect time
for vacations, playful times, social occa-
sions, love affairs, romance, sports and
activities with children. You want to
have fun!
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Home, family and real estate matters
are your primary focus for the month
ahead. Discussions with family, espe-
cially a parent, could be significant.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Fasten your seat belt! You've got
places to go, things to do and people to
see. You're entering a busy phase of your
life. Plan on taking short trips, running
many errands and talking to siblings.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
You've been thinking alot about your
values lately. This could be because old
money issues or the opportunity to make
a major purchase have arisen again in
your life.

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
For the next four weeks, the Sun will
be in your sign. Happy birthday! This is
your tarn to recharge your bateries for
the rest of the year. It's all about you
now.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
It's time to lie low and work behind
the scenes. You need time to contemplate
what your New Year should be, because
your birthday is looming!
OAPRICORN
(Dec. 22to Jan. 19)
Your popularity rating definitely is
going to increase. Everyone wants to see
your face. Accept all invitations. Enjoy
schmoozing with others.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
The Sun is high in your chart now, act-
ing like a spotlight on you. Because of
this, others notice you - especially
bosses and VIPs. Furthermore, they
think you're great!
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Try to do something different. The
next few weeks are an excellent time to
sign up for a course or travel some-
where. You're eager for adventure and
the opportunity to learn something new.
YOU BORN TODAY You have excel-
lent social skills. You practically can
magnetize others to you with your
charm. You're aware of your image and
how you look. Your private life is dra-
matic because, despite your sophisti-
cated exterior, you are a passionate,
rebellious person! In the year ahead, a
major change could take place, perhaps
something as significant as around 1998.
Birthdate of: Jeff Goldblum, actor;
Catherine Deneuve, actress; Sarah
Bernhardt, actress.

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