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October 08, 2007 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-10-08

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Ir.aq vet: 'U' does't accomodat
Opinion, page 4A
cii~e liaid jigan 4 haij

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Monday, October 8, 2007

michigandaily.com

A WIN. AND A RECORD

CRIME ON FOOTBALL SATURDAYS
Rowdiness
on rise at
Big House

More citations,
arrests at big
games, 3:30 starts
By JESSICA VOSGERCHIAN
Daily StaffReporter
Crime at Michigan Stadium
during home football games
has increased so far this year,
according to statistics from the
Department of Public Safety.
There have been 240 inci-
dents - citations, arrests or
ejections from the stadium
and its adjoining parking lots
and the University golf course

- this year. There had been 224
such incidents by the fifth home
game in 2006 and 176 by the
same point in 2005.
The crimes with the highest
incidence in all three seasons
are possession of alcohol in the
stadium, minor in possession
and disorderly conduct.
DPS spokeswoman Diane
Brown said DPS officers aren't
approaching stadium security
any differently than in past
years.
"There's been no change in
philosophy, particularly since
9/11," she said.
The spike in crime is likely
See ARRESTS, Page 7A

Mike Hart, who broke Michigan's career rushing record on Saturday, runs for one of his three touchdowns during a 33-22 victory over Eastern
Michigan University.
MICHIGAN CAREER
RUSHING LEADERS

ARRESTS, CITATIONS AND EJECTIONS
Incidents in and around the Big House at the first five home games
250 r-

1. Mike Hart, 4,655 career yards
2. Anthony Thomas, 4,472 yards
3. Jamie Morris, 4,393 yards
4. Tyrone Wheatley, 4,178 yards
5. Butch Woolfolk, 3,861 yards

Mike Hart's career rushing
yards after Saturday,
a school record

Mike Hart's rushing yards
this season

Number of lost fumbles by
Mike Hart in his three-and-a-
half seasons at Michigan

200 F
150
100

SEE TODAY'S SPORTSMONDAY FOR MORE ON THE GAME
" Hart's record-breaking game, page lB
" Why a roster full of injuries is no excuse for lackluster performance, page1B
" The future of Mario Manningham, the perplexing star wide receiver, page 2B

AN ALTERNATIVE TO STUDYING ABROAD
A semester in Spain? Try Detroit

50

2005

2006 2007
SOURCE:DEPARTMENTOFPUBLICSAFETY

Students propose
a residency
in the Motor City
By EMILY BARTON
Daily StaffReporter
University alum Rachael Tan-
ner was sitting in her urban and
community studies class in April
when a thought struck her: The
University already sends students
to Washington, D.C. for a semester.
Why not set up a similar program
in Detroit?
So Tanner came up with the
idea for a semester-long residency
in Detroit. She's now organizing
a program in which students live
and work there for a semester while
taking classes at the University's
Detroit Center.
The program's goal is to get stu-

dents interested in Detroit and its
problems, said LSA senior Aditi
Sagdeo, who is organizing the
semester's planning team.
"We're really hoping students
will get a meaningful experience
about what it means to live in a city
and contribute to the community,"
she said.
Tanner said the semester in
Detroit program is still in the plan-
ning stages. A group of 10 to 15
students is working with Univer-
sity faculty and staff members to
gauge interest and begin laying the
groundwork.
Sagdeo said organizers are still
talking to University departments
about course offerings. Organiz-
ers also need to find housing and
employment for participants.
Tanner said she would love for
the program to allow students and
the University to be a part of the
revitalization of Detroit.

"That would be really amazing,"
she said.
The program would become one
of many University outreach pro-
grams in Detroit, including the
Detroit Project and the University's
Detroit Center. It plays in to a larger
University strategy of reaching out
to poorer cities and towns around
the state as a way of maintaining
ethnic diversity.
Outreach was a major part of the
University's Diversity Blueprints
task force report. The task force was
charged with finding ways to main-
tain diversity in the wake of Pro-
posal 2 banning affirmative action
programs in the state.
The University is. also plan-
ning a larger outreach center that
would coordinate outreach to high
schools around the state, including
in Detroit.
On Thursday, the University
announced plans to create an out-

reach center in hopes of develop-
ing closer relationships with K-12
schools throughout the state. The
University's Diversity Blueprints
task force first floated the idea for
this program in its March report.
The report contained ideas for pro-
grams the University could use to
maintain ethnic diversity after the
passage of Proposal 2.
The University is beginning its
search for a director of the program,
said Education Prof. Percy Bates,
co-chair of the Diversity Blueprints
task force subcommittee that sug-
gested the outreach center.
"If we're going to maintain a
diverse campus, we're goingto have
to increase outreach," he said.
Bates said the program will also
consolidate all the University's
efforts at networking with K-12
schools. Once a director is hired,
Bates said, the center will target
school districts for outreach.

ATHLETICS AND ACADEMsCS
Graduation rates steady for Michigan athletes

coURTESY OF MATTHEW MCKEOWN
Members of the Michigan Aeronautical Science Association set up the Mav-
erick III rocket in the Black Rock Desert outside Reno, Nev.
Sky-high dreams
dashed in desert

Men's basketball
grad rate falls;
football up slightly
By KEVIN WRIGHT
Daily Sports Editor
There has been no significant
change in the University's student-
athlete graduation rates for most
sports since last year, according to
statistics released by the NCAA last
week.
The numbers reflect the suc-
cess of the class of athletes who
entered universities between 1997

and 2000.
The Michigan men's basketball's
graduation rate fell from 74 percent
in last year's statistics to57 percent
this year.
Michigan Athletic Director Bill
Martin cautioned against reading
too much into fluctuations. He said
it's tough to measure smaller sports
that only have three to four stu-
dent-athletes in a class.
"There's a big difference between
four seniors and fifteen you would
have in football," Martin said. "That
has to be taken into consideration."
The Wolverines showed improve-
ment in football (up 2 percent to
73), women's soccer (up 9 percent

to 88) and women's gymnastics (up
10 percent to 100).
Martin said he was pleased with
the latest numbers.
He said that his goal has always
been to have the graduation rate
of Wolverine athletes mirror the
University's general undergraduate
population.
The overall graduation rate for
University athletes will be released
later this month.
The graduation rate is the per-
centage of athletes who graduate
within six years of entering a Divi-
sion I university.
The overall Division I gradua-
tion rate remained at 77 percent,

the same as last year.
NCAA President Myles Brand
has targeted 80 percent as his
eventual goal for the Division I
graduation rate. But he said he was
pleased with the efforts universi-
ties have made to raise expecta-
tions.
"NCAA student-athletes are
students first, and by and large
they are good students," Brand
said last week. "They have been
afforded the privilege of compet-
ing in their chosen sport while
pursuing their studies as full-
time students, and most of them
are handling those twin responsi-
bilities quite well."

Students' goal to
break record ends
in pair of crashes
By KELLY FRASER
Daily News Editor
Engineering senior Kip
Daugirdas went to the Black
Rock Desert outside of Reno,
Nev. at the end of September in
hopes of setting a world record.
He wanted to watch the Maver-
ick III, a rocket that he helped
design and build, soar 70,000
feet.

Instead,he watched the rock-
et ascend a few thousand feet
and spin end-over-end before
falling back to earth - twice.
Daugirdas was one of a
handful of engineers from the
University's Michigan Aero-
nautical Science Association
who attempted to set a new
record by launching the rocket
70,000 feet in the air - higher
than airplanes fly - and more
than twice the current record
for a rocket of its class.
To reach that height, the
rocket would have had to travel
at about 3.5 times the speed of
See ROCKET, Page 7A

TODAY'S HI: 87
WEATHER LO:59

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ON THE DARY BLOGS
RIAA wins first file-sharing case in court
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/THEWIRE

INDEX
Vol. CXVili, No. 25
02n07The Michigan Daily
michigondailyrcom

NEWS ................................2A SUDOKU..............A....5A
OPINION 4....................4A CLASSIFIEDS..................6A
ARTS.................................5A SPORTSM ONDAY................. 1B

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