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September 28, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-09-28

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Northwester 1sn jk
Uni against Appalachian State, Wolverines won't be caught on their heels
Sports, page 8 Ar
1Bi4iganBnaI
(NE HUNDEII SEVEF ENiYEA S E DptmIT)ILE,20EIM
Friday, September 28, 2007

ts, page 8

Ann Arbor, Michigan

michigandaily.con

STATE BUDGET CRIS
Talks
go on,.
but no
deal yet
Shutldown could
begin on Monday
By ALESE BAGDOL
Daily StaffReporter
Michigan lawmakers are work-
ing at the wire to reach a budget
compromise that would eliminate
the state's $1.75 billion deficit and
avert the partial government shut-
down that will otherwise begin
Monday.
Both State Budget Director
Bob Emerson and House Fiscal
Agency Director Mitchell Bean
recommended that the legislature
finalize its budget by midnight
last night to allow enough time to
reprogram government computers
to reflect the new budget. Other-
wise the state won't be able to pay
some agencies by the Oct. 1 dead-
line, they say.
The Democrat-led House and
Republican-led Senate continue to
disagree over which steps should
be taken to eliminate the deficit.
"We have made some prog-
ress and hopefully we can reach
a bipartisan agreement as soon as
possible," said Greg Bird, spokes-
man for House Speaker Andy Dil-
lon (D-Redford).
But as the deadline draws clos-
er, more lawmakers are doubting if
they can avert a shutdown.
"There is no way a permanent
budget will be finished by Oct. 1,"
said Senate Majority Leader Mike
Bishop in a speech yesterday after-
noon.
If the legislature doesn't meet
the Oct.1 deadline, it will be forced
See BUDGET, Page 7

Crime steady, but alcohol,
drug violations on rise,
Other crime statistics flat; burglaries down slightly
By GABE NELSON MORE VICE? OR MORE VIGILANCE?
Daily News Editor The overall number of alcohol and drug violations reported by the Department of Public
The number of students fac- Safety have increased steadily over the last few years.

ing punishment for drinking and
using drugs on campus is on the
rise, according to figures released
by campus police earlier this week.
More than twice as many people
were arrested or referred for cam-
pus disciplinary action on drug
and alcohol charges last year than
in 2004.
The Department of Public
Safety's annual Campus Safety
Handbook reported 1,546 alcohol
violations last year, up from 841
in 2005 and 704 in 2004. Report-
ed drug violations also increased
from 71 ie 2004 to 109 in 2005 to
158 last year.
Most of that increase doesn't
appear to have come froi police
cracking down. While the number
of students facing MIP and drug
charges has remained relatively
constant, the University's Office
of Student Conflict Resolution was
much busier last year than it had
been in previous years.
The number of students referred
to OSCR for disciplinary action
in incidents related to alcohol has
skyrocketed from 157 in 2004 to
352 in 2005 to 930 last year. The
number of drug-related incidents
referred to OSCR has increased
from zero in 2004 to 24 in 2005 to
92 last year.
In those cases, residence hall
staff refers the student to a staff
committee rather than to police.
The committee reviews the inci-
dent and decides whether to dis-
miss the case or send it to official
arbitration. The student can often
settle the charges through com-
munity service - for example, by
making posters or organizing a
hall activity.
See CRIME, Page 7

1,546

1550
1240
930
620

KEY:
DrugViolations
Alcohol Violations

841

704

FINANCIAL AID REFORM
Bush
signs
student
aid bill
Maximum Pell Grants to
increase to $5,400
By EMILY BARTON -
Daily StaffReporter
President Bush signed a bill yesterday to
increase financial aid to poor and middle class col-
lege students.
The bill raises the maximum Pell Grant from
$4,310 to $5,400 over five years. It would also cut
federal student loan interest rates from 6.8 percent
to 3.4 percent over four years. The bill will also
limit the amount a borrower needs to repay to 15
percent of the borrower's discretionary income
when they earn below 1.5 times the poverty line.
Last year, 152,729 students received Pell Grants
in the state of Michigan. Of those, 3,350 went to
University of Michigan students.
The money for this increase will come from a
decrease in subsidies to student lenders by $21 bil-
lion.
Congress passed the bill on Sept. 7 with a vote of
79-12 in the Senate and avote of 292-97 in the House
of Representatives, making a veto ineffective.
Bush originally said he would veto the bill, say-
ing it was too expensive and included hidden costs,
but then promised to sign it because it promotes
aid for underprivileged students.
The bill comes after two previous attempts this
summer to pass legislation to increase financial
aid, which Bush and some student loan companies
opposed.
Mohammad Dar, vice president for the Michi-
gan Student Assembly, said the bill is needed to
reverse the trend of increased tuition. He said the
change in interest rates woul have the biggest
effect on students.
But Dar said the slight increase doesn't make
up for declining state aid, especially because Pell
Grants are only granted to students with signifi-
cant financial need.
"I think it's a step in the rightdirection," he said.
"Every little bit helps."

310

109 1582
71
E - 2004 205-2-6

0

It's not that police are catching more students, though. Almost allof the increase is due to
more referrals by residence hall staff to the Office of Student Conflict Resolution (BELOW).
DPS spokeswoman Diane Brown said a change in administration or better record-keeping at
OSCR could be the cause.
1550 F

1240 r

930

930
620

352

310 r

157

U0

24

92

0 2004 - 2005 2006
soURCE: DEPARTMENT oF PUBLIc sSAFETY

RENOVATING THE BIG HOUSE
*More seats for handicapped

PETTING PUPPETS

Lawyer for
paralyzed vets calls
addition 'a joke'
ByARIKIA MILLIKAN
DailyStaffReporter
Come next season, at least 14
disabled fans will have a better
view of football games at Michi-
gan Stadium.
University spokeswoman Kelly

Cunningham said the the Athletic in other parts of the stadium.
Department plans to add at least The announcement comes
14 wheelchair-accessible seats amid a lawsuit by the Michigan
parallel to the sidelines after this Paralyzed Veterans of America
season. that argues that the planned reno-
The Athletic Department made vations to Michigan Stadium do
the decision to add the seats based not provide the number of wheel-
on an ongoing evaluation of fan chair-accessible seats mandated
needs, Cunningham said. Some by the Americans With Disabili-
disabled fans have criticized plac- ties Act.
ing of all wheelchair-accessible The planned renovations will
seats in the endzones, which most add two structures containing
fans say afford poorer views of the luxury boxes and premium seat-
game, and they've requested seats See STADIUM, Page 7

Developer planning condos for fans

Company has
already built near
Notre Dame
By DANIEL STRAUSS
Daily StaffReporter .
Following the lead of several
real-estate companies across the
nation, a developer is working on

plans to build hotel-style condo- if the owners intend to only use
miniums in Ann Arbor aimed at the space on certain weekends to
fans who want a place to stay on go to football games, for example,
football weekends. Brenan said.
The condos will be about amile . For many diehard fans, the
and a half from Michigan stadium condos are an opportunity to
and cost between $97,000 and avoid sky-high hotel prices or the
$189,000, said Mike Brenan, gen- expense of maintaining a house or
eral manager of Brenan Hospital- apartment near the stadium. The
ity Management Group. condos are also furnished and
Buyers willbe able to rent space maintained by building staff.
out to offset the cost of the condos See CONDOS, Page 7

Ann Arbor resident Dan Cooney and his 3-year-old son Tobin admire a giant Elvis puppet at the FestiFools Open Studio Party in
its studio location in the Campus Security Services Building yesterday evening. The project started asa Lloyd Hall Scholars Pro-
gram class for non-art majors and has since grown into a community-wide public art project. Last spring, FestiFools held an April
Fools Day parade on Main Street.

TODAY'S H1: 72
WEATHER LU:43

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