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September 18, 2007 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-09-18

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KENNELLY: WHY DO PEOPLE STILL GO GREEK?
OPINION, PAGE 4
IIAsilign ;1wl~

Ann Arbor Michigan

Tuesday, September 18, 2007

michigandaily.com

PROTECTING GENDER EXPRESSION AND IDENTITY
Change to
policy goes
to regents

MBA student Jeremy Sharff says he thinks the business school will work to regain its perch atop the Wall Street Journal's annual ranking of MBA programs.
B.-School rank.plu.ets in WSJ

If b
non
clau
After
versity
on whet
der iden
non-dis
Univers
If th
sure -
board's
Univers
the mor
univers
that hav
discrim
ing of ac
make c
inclusiv
and fact
Thet
current
adequat
der ind
and act
because
the terr
an aster
with a f
term al
and exp
But a
bisexua

oard approves, nity, as well as many others, have
vehemently argued that without
-discrimination the specific inclusion of the term
gender identity and expression in
se would expand the bylaws, transgender individu-
als remain vulnerable to narrow
By MARA GAY interpretations of the discrimina-
Daily Staff Reporter tion clause.
Jackie Simpson, director of the
r years of pressure, the Uni- University's Office of Lesbian Gay
Board of Regents will vote Bisexual and Transgender Affairs,
ther to add the phrase "gen- said while the current bylaws are
tity and expression" to the technically effective, the Univer-
crimination clause of the sity's decision to use an asterisk to
ity's bylaws. provide this protection rather than
e regents approve the mea- simply including transgender in
slated to be voted on at the the non-discrimination clause is in
meeting on Thursday - the itself troubling.
ity of Michigan will join "It sends a wrong message," she
e than 75 other colleges and said. "There's something about it
ities around the country that doesn't feel right."
ve added the phrase to non- Simpson said the proposed
dnation clauses at the urg- changes are significant because
ctivists who say the changes they send the message that trans-
ampuses safer and more gender individuals are an impor-
'e for transgender students tant part of the community and are
ulty. supported by the University.
University has said that its "I see it as a huge victory,"
non-discrimination clause she said. "I see it as a historic
ely protects transgen- moment."
ividuals from hate crimes Regent Julia Darlow (D-Ann
s of intolerance on campus Arbor) says she'll vote to approve
they are included under the measure.
a sex. The University added "Although you can make argu-
isk to the term sex in 2005 ments that the bylaw already covers
ootnote explaining that the this topic, I think that making the
so protects gender identity position and the support unques-
'ression. tionably clear is truly important to
ctivists in the lesbian, gay, the people concerned and to all of
1 and transgender commu- See CLAUSE, Page 7

Ross MBA program
goes from first to
seventh; 'arrogance'
of grads cited
By DANIEL STRAUSS
Daily StaffReporter
The Ross School of Business's
MBA program is slipping, at least
according to 4,430 business com-
pany recruiters who took a survey
published in The Wall Street Jour-

nal yesterday.
Last year, the survey ranked the
University's program first in the
nation. The school ranks seventh
in this year's rankings.
Dartmouth College's Tuck
School of Business took the top
spot this year.
Recruiters rated 86 business
programs on roughly 20 different
attributes like students' previous
business experience, basic knowl-
edge of the business world and fac-
ulty and curriculum.
For a school to be ranked, it
must gain 20 ratings from survey-

takers who have recruited there in
the past.
According to The Wall Street
Journal's article about the rank-
ings, the recruiters who took the
survey were disappointed with the
University of Michigan program's
career services office. The article
also quoted a recruiter who said
students from the school "weren't
as prepared for interviews and
were somewhat more arrogant
than in the past."
Business School Dean Robert
Dolan said the University's decline
in the rankings may have been

because students offended some
recruiters when they turned down
their offers for other jobs.
"I think two things happened:
The job market got better. Our
students had a lot of offers," Dolan
said. "It was a great year for stu-
dents and a tough year for recruit-
ers. There were a lot of recruiters
who got 'no thank you's' from Ross
School students this year."
Dolan also said that because the
school's facilities are undergoing
renovations, presentations that
would have normally been held in
See RANKINGS, Page 7

Grad speaker
could be reporter
Bob Woodruff
Coleman seeks at graduation.
If Woodruff is named graduation
approval of honorary speaker soon, it will be one of the
earliest choices the University has
degree for newsman made in recent years.
hurt in I Last year's speaker, former
Iraq President Bill Clinton, was not
announced until December of
By LISA HAIDOSTIAN 2006. The 2005 speaker, John
Daily StaffReporter Seely Brown, former chief scientist
of Xerox Corporation, wasn't con-
The University's spring com- firmed until March of 2005 - one
mencement speaker could be ABC month before he gave the address.
News reporter Bob Woodruff, a Most graduating seniors praised
I University Law last year's choice of Clinton as a
School alum commencement speaker.
who sustained In previous years, though, stu-
life-threaten- dents expressed disappointment
iog injuries ' about the relatively low profile of
while covering speakers, like CNN's chief inter-
the war in Iraq. national correspondent Christiane
In a docu- Amanpour and Brown.
ment on the WOODRUFF Woodruffwasnearlykilledwhile
agenda for on assignment in Iraq last year.
Thursday's meeting of the Univer- Woodruff, who was named co-
sity Board of Regents, University anchor of "World News Tonight"
President Mary Sue Coleman asks in December of 200, was near Taji,
the board to approve awarding an Iraq, reporting on U.S. and Iraqi
honorary degree to Woodruff at security forces when a roadside
spring ommencement. bomb struck his vehicle on Jan. 29,
Traditionally, commencement B 2006.
speakers are awarded honorary Woodruff sustained critical
degrees. brain trauma in the accident and
The University also awards hon- underwent extensive surgery.
W orary degrees to people who don't Thirteen months after his injury
speak at commencement, but those and following a long recovery pro-
people aren't usually as well-known cess, Woodruff appeared on air for
as Woodruff. the first time in a special report
University Spokeswoman Relly titled, "To Iraq and Back: Bob
Cunningham declined to comment Woodruff Reports."
on whether Woodruff would speak See SPEAKER, Page 7

Members of the newly-formed Student Veterans Association want the University to lower tuition for returning veterans

Group wants to ease transition for vets

Going from war to post-high school years with the
Marines in places like Hong Kong,
class can be struggle Kuwait and Iraq.
o paorhelp students liae Byrne,
for students LSA junior and six-year Air Force
veteran Derek Blumke started
By CHRISTINA HAMATI the Student Veterans Association
Fao theDaily of the University of Michigan in
"-----------May. The group - which had its
After graduating high school, first meeting earlier this month
Ted Byrne wasn't getting ready - is the first of its kind at the Uni-
to pack up his car and head for versicy.
Ann Arbor. Instead, he shipped After reading an article in Cut-
off to U.S. Marine Corps boot rent magazine detailing soldiers'
camp at Parris Island, S.C. Rather transitions from active military
than going to fraternity parties or duty to college life, Blumke, who
football games at the Big House, worked as a photographer for
Byrne, now a 22-year-old LSA The Michigan Daily last semes-
freshman, spent his first three ter, decided to create the Student

BIG TEN STUDENT VETERANS
NO. OF VETERANS PERCENT OF STUDENT BODY

SCHOOL
Ohio Stale
Wisconsin
Michigan Slate
Michigan
Northwestern

591
2.24
98
48
16

1.154
0,544
0.217
0.119
uncertain about the future and
walking away from the security
of having a job in the military,"
Blumke said. "I realized I wasn't
the only one whose age and
See VETERANS, Page 7

Veterans Association. He wanted
to build a social network and ease
the transition into campus life for
other service members.
"It just made me realize that I
wasn't the only person who was

TODAY'S HI: 80
WEATHER LO:.59

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