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September 10, 2007 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-09-10

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Arts, page 5A
Monday, September10, 2007 michigandaily.com

N 9, MICHIGAN 7
DUCK AND COVER

Congress
passes
student
aid hike
Bush set to sign bill that would
raise maximum Pell Grant,
lower some interest rates
By DANIEL STRAUSS
For the Daily
Congress passed a bill Friday increasing finan-
cial aid for college students.
The legislation, which is awaiting President
Bush's signature, aims to overhaul federal student
aid by cutting subsidies to student lenders by $21
billion and using that money to reduce costs for
college students. About $11billion of the $21billion
would go toward raising the maximum Pell Grant
from $4,310 to $5,400 over the next five years.
Last year, 3,350 University students received
Pell Grants, and 152,729 total students received
them in the state of Michigan.
As states across the country cut funding for
higher education and colleges increase tuition,
many have expressed concern that college is
becoming unaffordable. Supporters of the bill say
it will counter that trend by reducing the burden
of student loans oncollege graduates.
The Senate voted on and approved the bill Fri-
day with a vote of 79-12. The House approved it
later that day 292-97. While all Democrats voted
for the bills, Republicans were split.
The bill would also cut interest rates for need-
based student loans from 6.8 to 3.4 percent. In
addition, the bill would cap the monthly amount
any borrower earning less than one and a half
times the poverty line can repay to 15 percent of
the borrower's income.
It also says that graduates that go into occu-
pations described as "areas of national need"
wouldn't have to begin repaying those student
loans for 10 years. That includes fields like emer-
gency management, government, public safety
and law enforcement.
See CONGRESS, Page 7A

Oregon running backJonathan Stewart leaps over Michigan's defensive line during the Wolverines' blowout loss to the Ducks on Saturday. Michigan's defense allowed 624 yi
the game, its second-worst performance in history.
Even after worst loss-since 1968,
Hart vows victory over 0-2 Notre Dame

By SCOTT BELL
Daily Sports Editor
The first 0-2 start at home in 48 years.
The first four-game losing streak in 40
years.
The worst margin of defeat in 39 years.
The second most yards allowed in a single
game in the program's 100-plus-year history.
No matter how you measure it, things are
going south for the Michigan football team
fast.
Saturday's 39-7 home loss to Oregon
dropped Michigan to 0-2 and affirmed most
people's fears from last week about the Wol-

verines.
With a game against winless Notre Dame
looming on Saturday and a freshman quar-
terback at the helm, Michigan is looking to
get back on its feet after two straight embar-
rassing losses.
At least one person is sure the team will
get back on track.
"We're going to win next week, there's not
a question in my mind," senior captain Mike
Hart said. "I guarantee we win next week."
But to win next week, the Wolverines will
have to forget about what happened on Sat-
urday.
They'll have to forget about Dennis

Dixon. Forget about his 292 yards and three
touchdowns through the air. Forget about
his touchdown and 76 more yards on the
ground. Forget about him embarrassing the
entire defense with a fake Statue of Liberty
play Boise State's Jared Zabransky would
applaud.
Add in Jonathon Stewart and Jeremi-
ah Johnson's 200 additional yards on the
ground, and that's a lot to forget.
"We need a better performance from'
everyone," running backs coach Fred Jack-
son said. "No one can point fingers. Nobody is
going to drop their head and talk about other
See FOOTBALL, Page 7A

Study is latest salvo in clash over
' state funds for higher education

- Last in a five-part series
High prices aren't our fault,
say ailing book publishers
Insiders: Bookstores BY THE BOOK
like Shaman Drum How the average dollar spent on textbooks gets divvied up:

Report says three
research universities
add $12.8 bil to state
By JESSICA VOSGERCHIAN
Daily StaffReporter
A study being released today
could help the University of
Michigan win the debate over
how Michigan should divide

higher education funds between
the state's public universities.
The report - paid for by a
coalition made up of the Univer-
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor,
Michigan State University and
Wayne State University - high-
lights economic contributions
the three universities made to
the state in 2006.
The study, performedby Ander-
son Economic Group, says the
three universities brought 68,803

jobs and $12.8 billion to the state's
economy last year, the Detroit
Free Press reported. According to
the report, 54 percent of science
and engineering degrees and all
medical doctorates in the state are
granted by the three universities.
The reportis partofacampaign
by a coalition, called the Univer-
sity Research Corridor and com-
posed of the state's three research
universities, to push state legisla-
See STUDY, Page 7A

After theft of keys, 'U' re-evaluates locks

just easiest to blame
By CHRIS HERRING
Daily News Editor
While students tend to blame
bookstores for high textbook pric-
es, industry insiders say it's a much
more complex issue.
Jeff Neel, a sales manager for
McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.,
one of the leading book publish-
ers in the country, said the text-
book industry is in turmoil and in
need of reform. He said even pub-
lishers aren't making very good
profits, despite the high cost of
textbooks.
"It's such a complex issue that
I don't really know where you can
assign blame," Neel said.
See TEXTBOOKS, Page 7A

7.1 cents
Publisher's
income

1.7cents 10cents 15.5 cents 4.9 cents
Author's Publisher's admin- Publisher's Pre-tax book-
royalty istrative costs marketing costs store income

DPS: No threat to
dorms, sensitive labs
By KELLY FRASER
Daily News Editor
The theft of a set of master
keys from a campus building last
month has raised concerns over
campus security levels.

On Aug. 30, a University
employee left the keys unattend-
ed on a tool cart and returned
about 10 minutes later to find
them gone. He reported the
keys stolen to the Department of
Public Safety the following day.
Police have no suspects.
The DPS incident log says the
theft occurred outside Medi-
cal Science Research Building I.

DPS Spokeswoman Diane Brown
would not comment on which
buildings were affected by the
theft.
Brown said police are still
determining which doors the
keys unlock. The affected areas
are mainly offices and main-
tenance areas like custodians'
supply closets. Sensitive areas
See LOCKS, Page 7A

32.5 cents
Publisher's
paper, printing
and editing

11.4cents 1 cent 5.9cents
Bookstore Shipping Bookstore
personnel costs operations
sOURE:TEXTBOOK TASK FORCE REPORT,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE STORES
GRAPHIC BY BRIDGET O'DONNELL AND EILEEN HENGEL/Daily

TODAY'S
WEATHER

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ON THE DAILY BLOGS
The Daily's website gets a facelift.
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/EDITORSPAGE

INDEX NEWS................................2A ARTS...............................5A
Vol.CXVil,No.5 SUDOKU.........................2A CLASSIFIEDS....................6A
r2007The MichiganxDaily OPiNiON................... ........ 4A S P O R T S MO N D AY..............1t
michigandaily com

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