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January 16, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-16

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e iC1 igaIi Wi1m

,Ann Arbor, Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

Say, anuar~y 16,07

U 1 h I i I i
4 4 4 _ I i y i I r
-- _- f _ , ___.,
i

BERENSON WINS
ARTS, 600TH GAME
PAGE 5A SPORTSTUESDAY

SOUTH U SHODOWN

KEEPING HIGHER ED RELEVANT
WHAT'S
NEXT FOR
COLLEGES?
University secondary Education, pro-
posed ways for universities
presidents call to become more relevant
and more successful in lead-
for tuition help, ing the United States to the
forefront of the informa-
culture shift tion-driven world.
Syracuse University Pres-
By GABE NELSON ident Nancy Cantor said the
Daily StaffReporter public has become distrust-
ful of universities.
The modern research uni- With a college degree
versity, born at the end of the primarily seen as a ticket to
Civil War, might be unrecog- employment, taxpayers and
nizable in 50 years, accord- voters often do not appreci-
ing to some of the veteran ate more abstract subjects
university administrators like Latin or theoretical
who spoke at a symposium mathematics, said Cantor,
on Friday. a former dean and provost
At the event, four former at the University of Michi-
and current university pres- gan.
idents - all of whom spent "To argue that there's
time at the University of classics and then there's the
Michigan - said American stuff that makes the world
universities face a rapidly run is very dangerous," she
growing list of challenges said.
that could lead to a dramatic If universities want to
change in the structure of maintain their funding lev-
the modern university. els and prestige, they must
Speakers at the sympo- find ways to make them-
sium, "Challenges to High- selves relevant to the com-
er Education in the 21st munity at large, she said.
Century," held in honor of "We all know what
the 50th anniversary of the doesn't work," Cantor said.
University's Center for the "It's saying 'we have the
Study of Higher and Post- See HIGHER ED, page 7A
HOW TO BUILD A i0
FOR-PROFIT UNIVERSITY
With public research institutions like the
University of Michigan struggling in the face
of declining publictfunding, some have called

BA MN rally
slams Prop 2
passage

Group scuffles
with right-wing
protesters
By LISA HAIDOSTIAN
For the Daily
Eleven-year-olds faced
off with University students
over the merits of affirmative
action as hundreds gathered
to protest the passage of Pro-
posal 2 on the Diag yester-
day. '
Militant pro-affirmative
action group By Any Means
Necessary sponsored a march
and rally that brought hun-
dreds of supporters to cam-
pus on Martin Luther King

Jr. Day. Promotional material
distributed by BAMN before
the event said the marchers
would demand "no drop in
minority enrollment in higher
education in Michigan."
Confrontations between
marchers and members of the
University's chapter of Young
Americans for Freedom,
a politically conservative
group, erupted when several
YAF members walked in front
of the march.
Marchers chanted a line
often heard at BAMN-spon-
sored protests: "They say 'Jim
Crow,' we say 'Hell no!"'
Most of the marchers were
middle school, high school
and college students from
across the state, though peo-

TOP: Alma Noriano, a California high school student, shouts during a pro-affirmative action march held by By
Any Means Necessary yesterday. BOTTOM: BAMN marchers clash with members of Young Americans for
Freedom. The conservative group held a counter-demonstration duringthe march.
ple of all ages took part in At least 40 members of the brought the students to Ann
the march. Organizers said band played music, twirled Arbor so they could fight for
the group bused almost 300 flags and danced at the front a cause that matters to them.
students from Detroit area of the pack. "This is a fight for their
schools, including members Maricruz Lopez, co-chair lives," she said.
of the Cass Technical High of the University's BAMN Shanta Driver, the national
School marching band. chapter, said the group See BAMN MARCH, page 7A

for universities to manage themselves like
businesses, University of Ilinois President
Joseph White said at Friday's symposium.
"Sometimes I'd like to, butyou wouldn't
let me - and I shouldn't" White said.
Although schools like the University
of Phoenix have followed corporate busi-
ness practices and made billions, trying to
run public research universities this way
wouldn't be effective, he said. White, a for-
mer dean and interim president at the Uni-
versity of Michigan, said wniversities would
have to take a numberof regrettable steps to
maximize profits.

. Raise tuition for every
program with excess
demand
. Close expensive programs
including medical schools
and public health programs
. Close the highly unprofit-
able library system
. Close all academic
departments and units that
don't funnel students into
high-paying careers

MIK SYMPOSIUM
Civil rights
leader issues
call to action

- ICE-CYCLE

Amid change, libraries
get high-profile leader

M
A
the
Luth
since
mati
Cong
calle
setb
M:
on t
civil
nota
NAA
B'
more
drop
moth
thre
beca
crim
fathe

[fume seeks to At 22, he obtained his GED
and graduated from Morgan
gnite' passion State University in Baltimore.
He later earned a masters
for change degree at John Hopkins Uni-
versity.
By DREW PHILP Mfume was elected to
Daily StaffReporter the Baltimore City Council
- -- in 1979 by a margin of three
t the keynote speech for votes. Seven years later, he
University's first Martin was elected to the U.S. House
ser King Jr. symposium of Representatives, where
e the passage of the affir- he served as chairman of the
ve action ban, former Congressional Black Caucus.
gressman Kweisi Mfume In 1996, he left Congress and
d the ballot initiative a assumed the presidency of the
ack. NAACP.
fume has spent time Students praised Mfume's
the front lines of the speech.
rights movement, most "His speech didn't speak
bly as president of the to just the academics," Social
CP. Work student Victor Harrell
orn and raised in Balti- said. "It spoke to the political,
e, Mfume was forced to social and spiritual aspects of
out of school after his what Dr. King stood for."
her's death. He raised his In an interview after the
e younger sisters but soon speech, Mfume said he hoped
.me involved in street his speech would drive stu-
re and became a teenage dents to action.
er. See MFUME, page 7A

Former provost
to shepherd
system through
Google project
By KATIE WOODS
Daily StaffReporter
One of campus's most seasoned
administrators is taking over the
library system at a crucial time in a
Google's mission to digitally copy to
more than 7 million volumes in the
University's 19 libraries.
Paul Courant, a School of Public
Policy professor who served as pro-
vost from 2002 to 2005, was appoint-
ed University librarian and dean of
University libraries on Friday. He will
take over March 1.
Although Google expects to com-
plete the copying within four or five
years, the company has faced opposi-
tion from some publishers who argue
that the project infringes on their
copyrights.
Courant said he hopes the project
will make it easier for students and
faculty to find specific texts. Many
students do not take advantage of
library materials that could further
help them in their studies, he said.
'"We have this enormous amount of
educational material," Courant said.

"It is the job of the library to help
students figure out how to sort out
the good stuff from the not-so-good
stuff."
Courant said he has prepared for
the job by researching how a library
operates as part of a university.
The Google project represents a
larger trend as students abandon old-
fashioned ways of finding informa-
tion. Tracking down specific pieces
of information has become a chal-
lenge on the Internet because of its
enormity, Courant said. He said the
Google project will help students find
trustworthy sources in context with
citations, which will prevent students
from using the disreputable informa-
tion that pervades the Internet.
"The problem lies in trying to trace
down specific texts in the vast elec-
tronic world of endless amounts of
materials," Courant said. "The chal-
lenge of the library is to organize
everything.
He said well-organized electron-
ic material is the most important
because that's where everyone looks
first.
A faculty member since 1973, Cou-
rantsaidhe plans to continueteaching
courses while serving as librarian.
He said he is excited to work as
librarian because the quality of a
university can be seen in its libraries.
Until the electronic revolution, it was
See COURANT, page 7A

ZAcHARY MEIsNER/Daly
Bicycles covered in ice outside of East Quad ResidenceN Hall last night during the ice
storm that hit campus over the weekend. Thirty-five deaths around the country were
caused by the storm.

TODAY'S HI: 23
WEATHER LO 13

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Tackling the heavy burden of raising children and
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