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April 16, 2007 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-04-16

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4SPECIAL SECTION
Moving on
As seniors prepare for commencement, a special section looks back at the
last four years at the University. 1C.
e 1Mdigan0aIj
ONE-tIUNDRED-SE\/ENEEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Ann Arbor, Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

Monday,April 16, 2007

Seniors get
nervous as
art gets wet

"We do not own this world. We borrow it from future generations."
- Rep. John Dingell (D-Dearborn) discusses the need for legislation on climate change

Sprinklers caused
water damage to
some final projects
By JESSICA VOSGERCHIAN
Daily StaffReporter
A sprinkler set off by a fire in
the Art and Architecture Build-
ing on North Campus late Friday
damaged the senior projects of
r some School of Art and Design
students.
The fire started in a corner of
a,.storage room attached to the
Slusser Gallery at about 11:30
p.m. It was quickly extinguished
by an automatic sprinkler sys-
tem before it could burn the art
projects, Department of Pub-
lic Safety spokeswoman Diane
Brown said.
Although only the sprinkler
head nearest the flames was trig-
gered, water seeped into the gal-
lery and damaged some of the
projects, Brown said.
Brown said it's too soon to
estimate the cost of the damage.
The fire also destroyed an equip-
ment cart and several laptops in
the storage room. Other items in
the storage room could have been
harmed by smoke, she said.

The senior projects were the
culmination of months of work
and were meant to represent
everything Art and Design stu-
dents learned at the school, Art
and Design senior Emily Peden
said.
"When I got a call about it,
shivers went down my spine,"
Peden said. "We put so much
time and effort into it - money
and thought."
Peden's project, a series of
maps, was in the room but was
not damaged.
The fire was likely sparked by
electric equipment being used in
a student's project, Brown said.
Students who were working
in the building were evacuated
after the alarm went off and were
barred from the building until
9 a.m. Saturday, said School of
Architecture senior Peter Shaw,
who was in the building at the
time of the fire.
Shaw and other students
working in a third-story studio
ignored the fire alarm and the
smell of smoke and continued to
work until they heard someone
yell that there was a fire in the
building, he said.
"We weren't about toleave," he
said. "We thought someone had
burnt some popcorn."
See FIRE, Page 3A

TOP: Children play during a rally calling for government action to fight human-caused climate change in front of Burton Tower on Saturday. BOTTOM: Rep. John Dingell
(D-Dearborn) speaks during the rally. Dingell said he plans to begin drafting climate change legislation this summer.

As. issue heats up,
a rally on climate

RELAY FOR LIF

Hieftje, Dingell pledge to fight
warming caused by humans
By KATHERINE MITCHELL
Daily Staff Reporter
Two people in polar bear suits stood on the
steps of Burton Tower Saturday to protest
human-caused climate change.
Ann Arbor Mayor John Hieftje and other rep-
resentatives of local, state and federal govern-
ment pledged to fight human-induced climate
change in front of an crowd of about 200 on
Ingalls Mall that afternoon.
The crowd withstood bitter temperatures
to attend the rally. Many demonstrators wore
ski caps, winter coats and wool mittens, even
though it was mid-April, as they called on Con-
gress to cut carbon emissions by 80 percent by
the year 2050.
LSA junior Andrew Munn, the chair of the
campus chapter of Climate Challenge, said
he was impressed by the turnout because the
weather was cold and several other major cam-
pus events took place on Saturday.
"Considering the weather, I'd say it was a
good turnout," Munn said. "It's clear that it's a
mainstream issue and people are taking it seri-

ously."
The rally was one of more than 1,400 held
by members of the Step It Up grassroots cam-
paign on Saturday - a day the group named the
National Day of Climate Action. Rallies with
attendance ranging from 20 to 1,200 people took
place from coast to coast.
The rallies came at a critical juncture in cli-
mate change policy. A United Nations report
issued in January said that global warming is
almost certainly being caused by humans. Mean-
while, the issue is garnering ever more attention
from politicians and the press.
U.S. Rep. John Dingell (D-Dearborn) told
the audience on Ingalls Mall that he will begin
drafting climate change legislation early this
summer. He said he hopes the legislation will
help mankind give the Earth to future genera-
tions in better shape than it is in right now.
"We do not own this world," Dingellsaid. "We
borrow it from future generations."
Other speakers at the rally included State Sen.
Liz Brater and State Rep. Rebecca Warren, both
Ann Arbor Democrats.
Warren outlined three initiatives that were
echoed by other speakers throughout the
day: an emphasis on energy policy, improved
environmental building codes and individual
actions like replacing incandescent light bulbs
with fluorescent ones to increase energy effi-

LSA freshman Steve Bedford (center), LSA junior Jane Chung, (secnnd from
right) and University staff member David Shin (right) try to buy their way out of
jail by gathering donations at Relay for Life on Palmer Field on Saturday.
a e e
Relay participants
' run for research

ciency.
Hieftje ended the event by speaking about
Ann Arbor's dedication to environmental issues,
He spoke about Ann Arbor's Green Energy Chal-
lenge, which stipulates that by 2010, the city
government will obtain 30 percent of its energy
from renewable sources. By 2015, the challenge
aims to meet 20 percent of Ann Arbor's total
energy needs with renewable energy.
"Don't let anyone tell you we can't make the
change to green energy," he said. "We're doing
it."

Event raises more
than $267,800
By TARYN HARTMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Engineering senior Jay Trz-
cinski spoke at his first Relay for
Life in 1998, and attended one
each year since he lost his father
to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
Trzcinski's family has been
profoundly affected by cancer.
The disease claimed both of his
M father's parents before Trzcinski
was born. His mom's father is a
survivor of prostate cancer.
This past weekend, Trzcin-
ski spearheaded his own unique
fundraiser, a "tiki jail," at the
University's fifth-annual Relay
r for Life. From 10 a.m. Saturday

to 10.a.m. Sunday, over 2,400
participants from 160 teams rep-
resenting groups of friends, stu-
dent organizations, fraternities
and sororities circled the track at
Palmer Field for 24 straight hours
to raise money for the American
Cancer Society.
A self-described Jimmy Buffet
fanatic, Trzcinski and his team,
the Parrotheads, built a Margari-
taville-themed jail,complete with
bamboo bars and grass walls,
next to the track. Relay partici-
pants could pay Trzcinski's "Par-
rothead Police" to "arrest" their
friends and haul them to the jail
in a red plastic wagon, where
the captives were adorned with
Hawaiian leis. Before they could
be released, the prisoners had to
match the donation that got them
thrown in jail by asking passers-
See RELAY, Page 3A

TAKE BACK TH E NIGHT
A m--arch against
sexual assault, fear

One hundred join
rally through streets
By ALLISON PINCUS
Daily StaffReporter
A group of mostly women
weaved its way through the streets
of Ann Arbor as the sun went down
Friday night. As the crowd of about
100 turned from East Liberty

Street onto State Street, a middle-
aged man standing on the sidewalk
flashed a thumbs-up sign in sup-
port of the marchers.
The participants in the 28th
annual Take Backthe Nightmarch
walked around the streets of Ann
Arbor at dusk to assert their abil-
ity to be outside at night without
the fear of sexual assault, said
Ariel Esterkih, a graduate student
in the School of Social Work and
See NIGHT, Page 3A

cLiF REEDER/Daily
Supporters march in the 2007 Take Back the Night rally on Friday. The event fea-
tured speakers, music and a march around Ann Arbor.

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