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April 10, 2007 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-04-10

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I N LIIIEI-HUNDREDSEVENTEN K \ KSIII I N

nn Arbor, ichigan www.michigandaily.com

Iuesday, April10 2007

COCA-COL A CONT ROVERSY
Coke investigations
behind schedule

DEADLINE TROUBLE
The pair of investigations into Coca-Cola have missed
this deadline:
* March 31, 2007Deadlinefor assessments of the conditions
for Coke workers in Colom-
bia and environmental
issues in India
appear lkelp that
they will make
these two:
" April30,2007:
Deadline to
report investi-
gation results to
the University
" Map 3,2007: Il
Deadlinetor Coketo
have a plan oftaction in
place to deal with the
alleged infractions

" Inquiries into alleged
violations were slated
to end in May
By EMILY ANGELL
Daily StaffReporter
When the University reinstated
its contracts with the Coca-Cola

Company in April of 2006 after a
four-month suspension, the cor-
poration agreed to an independent
investigation into alleged human
rights violations in Colombia and
environmental violations in India.
A year later, both the Interna-
tional Labor Organization inves-
tigation in Colombia and the Tata
Energy Research Institute inves-
tigation in India haven't met the

deadline set by the University's
Dispute Review Board for produc-
ing a documented assessment of
conditions in either country.
In June of 2005, the Dispute
Review Board said it had evidence
that local Coke bottlers' labor vio-
lations and pesticide use in India
may have violated the University's
Vendor Code of Conduct.
See COKE, Page 3

IN THE ART SCHOOL, PREPARING FOR FINALS

Record
year for
''apps
Last set of decisions for class of
2011 to go out on Friday
By LAYLA ASLANI
Daily StaffReporter
Be glad that you've already been accepted to the
University.
On Friday, letters will go out to the last crop of high
school seniors who applied to the University for next
fall. Early next week, they'll arrive in their mailboxes,
and the hopeful applicants will find out if they got in.
Chances are, they didn't.
The admissions cycle for next fall's freshman class
is ending Friday, and statistics suggest that this is one
of the most competitive admissions cycles ever.
The acceptance rate for this year's freshman class is
expected to be about 45 percent compared to about 47
percent last year, according to the University's Under-
graduate Admissions website.
Chris Lucier, the University's director of recruit-
ment and operations, said the University set a new
application record this year, with about 27,000 appli-
cants. That includes an increase in in-state, out-of-
state and international applications.
The University's targeted freshman enrollment is
5,400 students, but it sent out only about12,300 accep-
tance letters because slightly more than half of those
accepted will not enroll.
Last year, 25,733 people applied for admission,
about 1, 200 fewer than this year.
Because University does not admit more students in
response to an increase in applications, admissions is
becoming more selective instead, Lucier said.
Lucier said the application increase is a reflection of
the University's growth in popularity.
"I think Michigan is truly recognized as one of the
See ADMISSIONS, Page 3
BY THE NUMBERS
Approximate number of freshman Number of freshman applications
applications received for fall 2007 received for fall 2006

Art and Design seniors Julie Kramer and Katie Mason set up their final projects in the Slusser Gallery on North Campus last night. All 86 Art and Design graduates must complete a year-
long project. The annual senior exhibition begins Thursday with a film screening at the Michigan Theater. The students' work will also be presented beginning Thursday in the Work, Slusser
and Robbins Galleries.

Approximate freshmanaccep-
lance rate for fall 2007

Freshman acceptance ratefor
fall 2006

EXAMINING THE ELECTION
Exit poll: Most Asian
voters rejected Prop 2

After being fired from Blue,
Amaker hired at Harvard

In California, shows that Asian American voters
opposed Proposal 2 by awider mar-
Asian American gin than each of the three cities did
as a whole.
college enrollment A decade ago, before a similar
ban was passed in California, the
went up after ban University of California system's
freshman class was 36 percent
By JAKE HOLMES Asian American, but Asian Ameri-
Daily StaffReporter can students ake usp 42 percent
of this year's freshman class. Asian
Exit poll results show that in Americans make up only 14 percent
last fall's election, Asian American of the state's high school graduates.
voters from three Michigan cities At the University of Michigan,
overwhelmingly opposed a ban on Asian Americans are not consid-
affirmative action even though the ered underrepresented minorities
ban may be against their own self- and therefore did not receive pref-
interest when it comes to college erences in admission before the
admission. passage of Proposal 2.
The passage of a similar ban in Still, Mark Grebner, president of
California resulted in an increase the consulting firm Practical Politi-
in Asian Americans at public uni- cal Consulting, said he's not sur-
versities. prised by the data.
The Asian American Legal He said Asian Americans feel
Defense and Education Fund pre- marginalized in American societyin
sented yesterday at the University a similar way to black Americans.
Law School the results of an exit Because Asian Americans are
poll that showed that 78 percent of also minorities in a primarily white
all Asian voters surveyed in Ann society, Grebner said they sympa-
Arbor, Hamtramck and Dearborn thize with the interests of black
voted against Proposal 2, which people, thus they would oppose an
banned the use of affirmative action anti-affirmative-action measure
by public institutions in Michigan. like Proposal 2.
Those numbers show far more "For 80 percent of the people,
opposition to Proposal 2 from Prop 2 was a referendum on 'How
Asian voters than from white vot- do you feel about black people?' "
ers. The measure passed with 58 Grebner said.
percent of the vote. The data also Ann Arbor is one of the least seg-

BY THE NUMBERS
Percentage of Asian Americansuwho voted
against Prop 2 in Ann Arbor, Dearborn and
Percentage of voters statewide who voted
against Prop 2
Percentage of the state's population that is
Asian American, according to the 20DQ Census
Percentage of Ann Arbor's population that is
Asian American, accordingtothe census
regated towns in the country, Greb-
ner said. He said that because Ann
Arbor has little separation between
where different races of people live,
there are high feelings of inclusion
See VOTERS, Page 7

Wife, an assoc. dean,
to go with him
By DANIEL BROMWICH
Daily Sports Editor
Former Michigan basketball
coach Tommy Amaker has been

offered the head coaching job at
Harvard and is expected to accept
it as early as tomorrow, The Bos-
ton Globe reported.
Amaker was fired last month
after the Wolverines missed the
NCAA Tournament for the sixth
straight year under his watch, but
he "dazzled" the Harvard search
committee in an interview Fri-

day, according to the Globe. He is
expected to get a multi-year con-
tract worth about $225,000 per
year.
The 41-year-old Falls Church,
Va. native, coached Seton Hall
before coming to Ann Arbor and
was on Mike Krzyzewski's staff at
Duke as an assistant coach before
See AMAKER, Page 7

A PIECE OF THE DIVERSITY PUZZLE

Students work together yesterday evening in the Parker Room of the Michigan Union to paint a puzzle piece representing
their group, Experimental Aircraft, for a giant mural. The mural will feature pieces from more than 100 student groups and
will form a block M. The goal of the project is to bring diverse groups together.

TODAY'S HI 46
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