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March 09, 2007 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2007-03-09

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Ann Arbor, Michigar

www.michigandaily.com

Friday, March 9,

'U has no stock in Sudan
0v 0
won't rule out investing
U. Chicago refusal to hasn't been a topic of debate at the that I'm just not going to answer," stocks of any company widely rec-
University of Michigan. she said. "We don't anticipate ognized for working in Sudan," he
divest draws protest That's because the University investing in Sudan." said. "Nor do we own bonds in any
doesn't have any funds invested in Tim Slottow, the University's company widely recognized for
the region, administrators said. Chief Financial Officer, said inan e- working in Sudan."
By BRIAN TENGEL But asked if the University would mail interview that the University This hasn't been the case for
Daily StaffReporter rule out investing in Sudan in the doesn't have holdings in any com- many other colleges, though.
future, University spokeswoman panies doing business in Sudan. In the past two years, Harvard
While the issue of divestment Kelly Cunningham declined to "We have never officially divest- University, Yale University and the
from Sudan has created a stir at comment. ed from Sudan because the Uni- University of California system have
many colleges across the nation, it "That's a hypothetical question versity has not and does not own See SUDAN, Page 7

"There is a great deal the public does
not know and should not know
at this point."
- Washtenaw County prosecutor Steve Hiller at a forum
Wednesday on the murder of an Eastern Michigan student.

S

Eastern Michigan University President John Fallon answers a question during
a forum Wednesday about the death ofa student.
At EMU, anger
over response
to a murder
Students say they suspicious from the beginning.
Dickinson was found naked from
were left in the dark the waist down with a.pillowcase
over her face Her keys were miss-

MICHIGAN 49, MINNESOTA 41
Hanging o
Blue must upset Buckeyes today to keep tournament hope alive

about real cause of
student's death
By JESSICA VOSGERCHIAN
Daily StaffReporter
YPSILANTI - Eastern Michi-
gan University student Jessyca
Riggleman said she was betrayed
by her university.
In December, an EMU student
was raped and murdered in Hill
Residence Hall, where Riggleman
lives.
The way the EMU administra-
tion handled the incident fright-
ened her, Riggleman said at a
forum Wednesday to address the
concerns of students and faculty
about the death of EMU student
Laura Dickinson Dec.15. Admin-
istrators at the school are facing a
growing chorus of criticism over
their handling of the crime.
After Dickinson's body was
found on the floor of her dorm
room three days after she died,
the administration issued release
said foul play was not suspected.
Administrators didn't tell stu-
dents and faculty that Dickinson
could have been murdered until
another EMU student, Orange
Taylor III, was arrested and
charged with the crime on Feb.
23.
But Bader Cassin, the Washt-
enaw County medical examiner,
told The Ann Arbor News that
investigators found the scene

ing.
At the forum, Riggleman and
several others in a crowd of about
300 asked questions of EMU Pres-
ident John Fallon among other
administrators and criticized the
management of the case.
Fallon opened the forum by
recounting the controversy that
took hold of the EMU campus
after Taylor was arrested.
Ken McKanders, EMU's gener-
al counsel, explained the Cleary
Act, which requires federally-
funded institutions to warn com-
munity members when a crime
poses a continuing threat.
An external investigation will
be conducted to assess whether
EMU complied with the Cleary
Act, Fallon said.
Steve Hiller, Washtenaw
County's deputy chief assistant
prosecutor, said the university
and local police tried to keep the
details of the crime and inves-
tigation under wraps to avoid
creating prejudices in the jury
pool that could affect the trial.
Fallon said some were also con-
cerned that a suspect would flee
before an arrest could be made if
it got out that the case was being
investigated a' a potential homi-
cide.
"There is a great deal the pub-
lit does not know and should not
know at this point," he said.
Audience members asked why
Jim Vick, EMU's vice president
See EMU, Page 7

CHICAGO - Don't get excited just yet.
The Michigan men's basketball team
may have been beaten Minnesota, but
one Big Ten Tourna-
ment win doth not an
NCAA Tournament
berth make.
If the Wolverines
want a chance to be
called on Selection
Sunday, they have -
to take care of busi- H. JOSE
ness this afternoon BOSCH
against No. 1 Ohio
State at the United
Center.
Even then, Michigan's tournament
chances are slim with teams like Butler,

Old Dominion and Drexel failing to win
their conference tournament champion-
ships and possibly taking away at-large
bids from the Wolverines.
And if yesterday's game was any
indication, Michigan may be in a lot of
trouble.
The Wolverines played just as lethar-
gic as the lazy crowd that slowly filed in
over the course of the game.
Twenty-seven percent shooting from
the floor.
Fifteen turnovers to 10 assists.
And one really ugly basketball game.
Sure, the Wolverines live to see another
day. But if Michigan is trying to save its
NCAA
Tournament chances, the Minnesota

game was the equivalent of placing a
band-aid on a gaping wound.
Following the Wolverines' ugliest
performance of the year (which is say-
ing a lot considering some of the poor
efforts this season), they should have
just one thought in mind now: Bring on
the Buckeyes.
Beating the Gophers was great. Aveng-
ing an embarrassing opening-round loss
from last season is even better. Neither
will feel as good as slayingthe giant
of the Big Ten this afternoon. And you
know what, it just might happen.
Michigan has played Ohio State close
in both of its games this season. On the
road, the Wolverines held their own and
See BASKETBALL, Page 7

CHEAP
SEATS,
WINDY
CITY
Company offers $1
bus rides from
A2 to Chicago
By KATHERINE MITCHELL
Daily StaffReporter
Escaping for the weekend just
became as cheap as buying a bottle
of soda from a vending machine.
Megabus.com will start offer-
ing $1 rides from Ann Arbor to
Chicago on April 2.
Tickets will cost as little as $1

ICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY
As election nears,
record mixed

each way depending on when pas- each way.
sengers buy the tickets and what Matt Eggert, the company's
day they intend to travel. The operations manager, said the trips
company only books trips 45 days will appeal to students because
in advance. they're cheap and convenient.
If students buy their tick- Unlike rival companies like Grey-
ets closer to the date of the trip, hound, Megabus.com only offers
though, tickets will likely cost express trips with no stops.
more - sometimes $30 or more "It's a great thing for a college

Megabus.com
Operations Man-
ager Matt Eggert
during a press
conference about
the launch of a
new bus serice
between Ann
Arbor and Chicago.
town," he said.
Eggert said the company can
afford to charge so little because
their low prices attract many
customers and fill buses to capac-
ity. He said he expects the trend
to continue in Ann Arbor. Buses
already run in 51 cities in England,
See BUS, Page 3

'We didn't give the
students anything to
care about,' says one
representative
By EMILY ANGELL
Daily StaffReporter
Last year's contentious Michi-
gan Student Assembly election
ended with Students 4 Michigan
winning the vast majority of MSA
seats. Its presidential candidate,
Nicole Stallings, was also elected.
Candidates from S4M promised
to improve student housing and
campus safety, to increase funding

for student groups and to strength-
en the assembly's connection with
students.
A review of MSA's activities
over the last year, though, shows
a mixed record of meeting those
promises.
With this year's election only
weeks away, candidates from the
Michigan Action Party, which con-
sists of many former S4M mem-
bers, appear poised for another
decisivevictory.Presidentialcandi-
date Zach Yost will take on Defend
Affirmative ActionParty candidate
Maricruz Lopez.
When asked what MSA's most
significant contribution to the Uni-
versity had been this year, MSA
See MSA, Page 3

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