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March 08, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-03-08

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DIBO: JAPAN NEEDS TO OWN UP -C QTATTOOING THERM PYLAE FORG CAGERS, BIG PRESSURE AT
TO INJUSTICE AGAINST WOMEN "THE BIG TEN TOURNEY
OPINION, PAGE 4A ANN ARBOR NATIVES WORK ON 300 THE B-SIDE SPORTS, PAGE 5A
-Ije M3idiigan hilp

Ann Arbor, Michigar

www.michigandaily com

Thursday, March 8, 2007

Last in a series about the University's
connection to the Iraq war

AFTER PROPOSAL 2
P anel: Most
programs
are legal

Commission says
only 8 of 45 state
diversity efforts
need changes
LANSING (AP) - Government
efforts to promote diversity and
equal opportunity in Michigan
largely can continue despite a new
law banning some types of pub-
lic affirmative action programs,
according to a report released
yesterday.
The Michigan Civil Rights
Commission reviewed 45 state
programs it thought could be in
jeopardy because of the new law,
which bans giving preferential
treatment based on race and gen-
der in education, government hir-
ing and contracting.
Only eight of those programs

likely need changes to comply
with the new law, according to the
report, which was done under an
order from Democratic Gov. Jen-
nifer Granholm. It includes recom-
mendations but doesn't carry legal
weight.
The specific implications of
Proposal 2 are likely to be settled
in court.
"This is unsettled law," said
Linda Parker, director of the Mich-
igan Department of Civil Rights.
"Preferential treatment has never
even been defined by a Michigan
court. We've got work to do in
terms of interpretation."
Granholm and some mem-
bers of the Michigan Civil Rights
Commission opposed Proposal 2,
which Michigan voters approved
in November. It took effect Dec.
23, although some legal challenges
by pro-affirmative action groups
See PROP 2, page 3A

Amid strife,
Coke exec
speaks at'U'

PETER SCHOTTENFELS/Daily
Orthotics technician Chris Casteel works or a prosthetic leg at the University Medical School's Orthotics and Prosthetics Lab
yesterday. In September, the Medical School provided a prosthetic leg for a child who was injured in a bomb blast in Iraq.
Fro-m humvees to PTSD,
profs pitch in

i

Even though some don't
support Iraq War, profs help
victims, military
By MARIEM QAMRUZZAMAN
Daily StaffReporter
In September, Medical School Prof. Bryan
Grose helped an 11-year-old bomb victim from
Iraq walk again.
The boy, Majed Mousa, lost his older brother
inthe same bomb blast outside an Iraqi store that
o claimed half of his right leg and injured his eye.
The Palestine Children's Relief Fund, an
Ohio-based charity that helps arrange medi-
cal treatment for children injured in conflicts
in the Middle East, paid for the transportation
of Mousa and his mother to the United States.

The University Hospital treated both his eye
and leg injuries. Grose attached an artificial
legto Mousa's amputated one.
From medical procedures like the one Grose
performed to the development of new tires
for Army humvees, professors' lives are often
touched by a distant war in Iraq.
Grose usually performs prosthetic proce-
dures on victims of vascular disease or trauma
like car accidents. Bomb victims are different.
"I think he had some discomfort and pain in
his other limb since he still had pieces of metal
in it," Grose said. "You just have to be aware
if there are remaining injuries. You wouldn't
normally have to worry about that."
For four months, Grose taught Mousa how
to walk with his new leg and wear it properly,
even though he knew it would be temporary.
Mousa will eventually outgrow the prosthe-
sis - but he may never get a new one because

flying him to and from America for each
replacement would be too costly.
"I would say I'm not going to see him again,
which made ita little difficult doing this for him
knowingthatunlesshe wasgoingtogetit(hisleg)
replaced, it's goingto be temporary," Grose said.
Still, Grose said all the effort was worth it,
even though its effect will be temporary.
"There was a point to it," he said. "I was
helping him physically and emotionally."
The procedure only reinforced Grose's neg-
ative opinion of the Iraq War.
"I never liked the war," he said. "It was a
bit surreal sitting in that patient room with a
kid from Iraq whose brother had been killed.
I was seeing the result of what our government
decided to go do."
The University waived the estimated $20,000
bill for Mousa's treatment.
See IRAQ, page 7A

Wit
her ey
Reddy
al rela
Cola C
remair
ter's sr
Wyly I
Red
now-d
tracts
about:
tigatio
humar
bia. TI
Univer
the sa
pus in
tempo
2005,1
purchr

Potter had led April 2006 after the company
agreed to an independent investi-
rivestigation of gation -- headedby Potter.
Potter also serves as a U.S.
alleged rights employer delegate to the Inter-
national Labor Organization - a
violations branch of the United Nations that
monitors human and labor rights
By PHIL AZACHI - charged with conducting an
For the Daily independent investigation into the
soft drink giant's alleged viola-
h a shaky voice and tears in tions.
'es, University alum Deepti Potter, a 30-yearveteranoflabor
questioned Ed Potter, glob- relations, started his speech by
tions director of the Coca- describing the changes in his field.
ompany, about his ability to He didn't mention last year's cam-
n impartial following Pot- paign during his speech. Instead,
peech on workplace rights at he spoke about supply chain the-
Hall last night. ory as it relates to labor and about
dy, once a member of the his roles in the Coca-Cola Com-
efunct Coalition to Cut Con- pany and the international arena.
with Coca-Cola,asked Potter He said those roles have changed
his involvement in the inves- considerably because of the speed
ns of the company's alleged at which information is dispersed
n rights violations in Colom- and the rise of nongovernmental
he campaign petitioned the organizations.
rsity administration to halt Potter cited an the increase in
le of Coke products on cam- number of NGOs from just 400
2005. The demonstrators in 1980 to 50,000 today and the
rarily halted the sale in late increase in Internet users from a
but the University resumed million in 1994 to a billion today.
asing of Coke products in See COKE, page 3A

EOUINE EXTRACTION

CAMPUS DINING
'U' begins to plot meal plan changes

New plans expected
when Hill Dining
Center completed
By EMILY BARTON
Daily StaffReporter
Bhavya Sridhar says the Uni-
versity's dining hall policies are
forcing her to waste money. The
LSA freshman said she is only able

to use 10 or 11 meal credits of the
13 she pays for under her basic 13-
meal per week plan.
Sridhar said that she has a hard
time planningher week around the
dining hall hours.
"I feel like the system is really
manipulative," she said.
University officials said they are
aware of complaints like Sridhar's
and are planning a revision of on-
campus meal plan choices to coin-
cide with the fall 2008 opening of
the new Hill Dining Center.

Christine Siegel, senior associ-
ate director of University Housing,
said Residential Dining Services is
studying the plans and has hired a
consultant to work with Housing
officials and students to examine
the current meal credit system.
She said Residential Dining Ser-
vices will begin seeking out stu-
dents next week to participate in
a series of focus groups with the
consultant.
Over the past year, Residential
Dining Services has made sev-

eral changes to dining options
as officials have tried to address
some student concerns. The
changes have not confronted the
issue many students consider to
be paramount - the high cost
per meal, especially when some
go unused.
LSA sophomore Sarah Billiu said
her work and class schedule often
conflicts with meal times.
"I'm paying all this money and I
can't even use it," she said.
See DINING, page 7A

PETER SCHOTTENFELS/Daily
Horses drag logs from the woods outside the construction site of the Ann Arbor
District Library's new branch on Huron Parkway yesterday. The horses were used
to remove logs without destroying the entire wooded area.

TODAY'S HI: 29
WEATHER LO:16

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