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March 05, 2007 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-03-05

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Ann Ar bor. Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

ICERS BACK INTO NO. 2 PLAYOFF SEED SPORTSMONDAY

Sliding off
the bubble

Monday, March 5 2006
'ZODIAC' IS A MYSTIFYING
TRIUMPH ARTS, PAGE 5A
RIAA to
students:
Pay up

Music industry
intensifying threats
against downloaders
By KATHERINE MITCHELL
Daily StaffReporter
RC sophomore Baird Campbell
knows the perils of illegally down-
loading music.
Last semester, he received
a warning from the University
threatening to cut off his Inter-
net access shortly after he began
downloading music with Ares, a
file-sharing program.
It persuaded him to delete the
software - and the downloaded
music - from his computer in East
Quad.
"I haven't downloaded a single
thing since," Campbell said.
The music industry is widening
its fight against illegal file sharing
on college campuses. In the past, it
has either sent notices like the one
Campbell received to people to sus-
pected of illegal file sharing or filed
lawsuits against them. The result
was that many just received warn-
ings while only a few had to pay to
settlethesuits.
On Wednesday, though, the
Recording Industry Association of
America, which represents major
record companies, announced a
new plan to make many more peo-
ple pay for illegal downloads.

TOP TARGETS
Schools that received the most pirating
settlement offers from the music indus-
try duringa recent spate:
School Rank Letters
OhioUniversity 1 50
North Carolina State 2 37
University
Syracuse University 2 37
University of 2 37

Massachusetts at
Amherst
University of Nebras-
ka at Lincoln

3 36
osc E: RIAA

The group said it sent 400 let-
ters to universities identifying stu-
dents that the group believes have
illegally uploaded or downloaded
music. The letters say the students
have 20 days to reach a settlement
with the record company before
the company files a formal lawsuit.
Although the University did receive
any of the letters, it will likely be a
target in the future. RIAA officials
said they hope to send out 400 such
notices each month.
The RIAA has also increased
the number'Hof Warnings issued
to copyright infringers since the
beginning of this academic year.
Four times as many University stu-
dents have received notices this
year as last year.
See FILE SHARING, Page 3A

BOTTOM: Ohio State freshman Greg Oden boxes out Michigan's Epke Udoh. no. rOSU eked out a win against the Wolverines Saturday. TOP: Michigan forward BrIent
Petway dunks over Michigan State center Drew Naymick Tuesday. Michigan went ontto win that game.
Seniors have night to remember

FUNDING YOUR EDUCATION

t seemed fitting. years, they both came up short yet again.
Seniors and roommates Courtney With just one minute remaining and
Sims and Dion Har- the Wolverines trailing to the top-ranked
ris have underachieved Buckeyes by two on Saturday, Sims
throughout their entire bounced a dunk off the back of the rim.
careers. Figures, right?
Highly recruited out Known for his inability to finish strong,
of high school, both had Sims missed the easy finish.
become known bet- But then Ohio State turned the ball over
ter for failing to reach and Harris had a chance of his own.
their potential than DANIEL He drove the lane hard and forced
for exceeding or even BROMWICH a Buckeye foul. Sent to the line with
consistently meeting an opportunity to tie the game, Harris
expectations. missed the front end of a 1-and-1. The
And on Senior Day, after a 15-minute guard, who has struggled to find his
presentation honoring them and their con- niche on the team throughout his career,
tribution to Michigan over the past four couldn't find the net on a crucial free

throw in his final regular-season home
game.
Ohio State grabbed the rebound.
When the game ended just moments
later, it had snatched any of Michigan's
remaining NCAA Tournament hopes
along with it.
Sims and Harris talked before the sea-
son about their legacy, the lasting impres-
sion they would leave on the program.
Both envisioned a trip to the NCAA Tour-
nament.
The images that most will remember
are the botched dunk and the blown free
throw.
But that isn't fair.
See OHIO STATE, Page 7A

A NWH MAJOR
A CHANCE TO MAJOR IN ROMANCE?

Concentration would
allow students to pick
two languages
By EMILY BARTON
DailyStaffReporter
LSA sophomore Daniel Berman
came to the University hoping to

learn multiple romance languages.
He was surprised to learn that
the in the Romance Languages
and Literatures Department didn't
offer a major for students inter-
ested in learning more than one
romance language.
"Employers are lodking for ver-
satile employees," Berman said
in an e-mail interview. "Having
the ability to cover a lot of ground

when it comes to meetings, phone
calls, etcetera would be a valuable
asset."
If one professor the department
gets his way, though, students like
Berman will be able to major in
two romance languages.
In an e-mail sent to romance
language concentratorslastmonth,
associate department chair Jerrod
Hayes floated a proposal for a new

major that would allow students to
concentrate in two languages.
The department formed a com-
mittee in fall of 2005 to design a
concentration program that would
allow students to do so.
Students are currently unable to
earn majors in two romance lan-
guages or a major in one language
and a minor in another because
See MAJOR, page 7A

AP PHoTo
University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman (right) and MSU President
Anna Lou Simon (left) during a meeting with the Detroit Free Press editorial board
Wednesday after testimony before a House appropriations subcommittee.
Asking a strapped
state for more cash
ing comes as the state battles bud-
get shortfalls.
counterparts say Still, the university presidents
said their mission was vital to help-
university funding ing the state's battered economy
, recover.
will boost economy "It's just their opportunity to
expand on their special missions,"
By KATHERINE MITCHELL said subcommittee chair Pam
Daily StaffReporter Byrnes, a Democrat whose district
- __ includes the University of Michi-
DETROIT - University Presi- gan's North Campus.
dent Mary Sue Coleman joined her Byrnes said that the testimony
counterparts from the state's two allowed the universities to promote
other research universities in an themselves as an economic asset.
appearance before the state House The university presidents
appropriations subcommittee on emphasized that the only way
higher education in support of a bill to remain economically stable
that would increase funding to the is through innovation, and that
three schools by 2.5 percent. Michigan's research universities
Wayne State University Presi- are critical toproducinginnovative
dent Irvin Reid said that these individuals.
"powerhouses of research" are "We are at risk if we don't com-
vital to Michigan's entrepreneurial mit to more math and science,"
future and that economic devel- Coleman said.
opment starts in Ann Arbor, East One way the universities want
Lansing and.Detroit. to promote economic growth
The call for the increase in fund- See PRESIDENTS, page 3A

In 'U' press office, another departure.

Peterson will take
top communications
post at University of
Chicago
By ALLISON GHAMAN
For the Daily
Forthesecondtimeinsixmonths,
the University has lost one of its top
public relations specialists.

Julie Peterson, the University's
interim vice president for com-
munications and former chief
spokeswoman
for the Univer-
sity, is leavingk
at the end of --
the semester ,
to take the top
PR job at the
University of
Chicago. PETERSON
Peterson was spokeswoman for
the University of Michigan dur-

ing the Supreme Court battles
over affirmative action and was a
key part of the University's public
response to November's ballot ini-
tiative that forced the University
to stop using affirmative action.
With the University still
adapting to the constitutional
amendment and implementing
a controversial plan to renovate
Michigan Stadium, its public rela-
tions and communications office
faces a challenge in replacing its
two highest administrators.

Lisa Rudgers, the University's
vice president for communica-
tions, stepped down in December
to start her own consulting firm.
Peterson assumed her position
on an interim basis, but her own
tenure will be short-lived.In May,
Peterson will become vice presi-
dent for communications at the
prestigious Chicago school.
"Chicago is a better career
choice for me, with new envi-
ronments and new challenges,"
See PETERSON, page 3A

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INDEX NEW5.......
Vol. CXVII,No.106 UDOKU
02007 The Michigan Daily
michinonduilycom DPI NIODN..

.2A ARTS.. . . .A..........5A
.3A CLASSIFIED...................6A
..4A SPORTSMONDAY.................lB

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