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February 21, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-02-21

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Maybe all those student loans really are worth it. A look at the University's
six wealthiest alumni - and two very rich dropouts.
PLUS: Why Mary Sue Coleman would have been better for Harvard
lIie 1Midtciga n Da1j

Ann Arbor Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

Wednesday, February 21 2007
From the editor

Several articles that have
recently appeared in these
pages have been found to
contain plagiarism.
At least four articles by
Devika Daga - three sto-
ries on the arts page and an
unsigned editorial on the
opinion page - contain pla-
giarism. They are:
. "Didn't get your 'Kicks?'
indie group struggles with
coherent live act" (11/15/06):
This piece contained lan-
guage taken from The
Harvard Crimson and char-
tattack.com.
. "Exploring darker territory"
(01/30/07): This entire
article was taken from har-
moniummusic.com.
* "Ex-Hood member creates,
fills 'Need"' (02/07/07): This
article contained several pas-
sages taken from opuszine.
com.
* "From the Daily: More pills,
fewer abortions" (09/14/06):
This unsigned editorial to
which Daga contributed con-
tained a phrase taken from
The Guttmacher Report on
Public Policy.

light earlier this week.
However, this marks the
third time since 2004 that
plagiarism has been discov-
ered in the Daily. While the
act is not entirely prevent-
able, Daily editors share
some of the blame.
The previous two times,
we promised a comprehen-
sive effort to prevent its reoc-
currence. The editors carried
out the steps they promised
at the time, but some of the
initiatives have not been
continued with their original
rigor.
We have formed a com-
mittee to study how to guard
against plagiarism more
effectively in the long term.
I will keep readers updated
on its progress on my blog
at michigandaily.com/edi-
torspage. Readers can also
expect a full report in the
print edition before the end
of the semester.
The Daily is committed to
providing information to the
University community with
the highest journalistic integ-
rity, and we apologize for this
regrettable lapse.

PEnER S COTTNEsLS/Daily
A Woman walks pasta statue of Moses holding the Ten Commandments toward the library at the Ave Maria School of Law on Plymouth Road last niPht. Ann ArboEr's/ther
law school is moving to Florida.
A2 law school heads south

The Daily does not toler- 8 .e-,
ate plagiarism, and the writer Karl Stampfl
was fired when it came to Editor in Chief

Catholic law school
founded by pizza
baron to move from
p Ann Arbor to Florida
From staff and wire reports
Ave Maria University's board of
governors has voted to move its law
school from Ann Arbor to Florida,
the Catholic school currently locat-
ed on Plymouth Road said yester-
day.
After almost five years of dis-
cussions and research, the board
determined that relocating the Ave
Maria School of Law gives it the

best opportunity to thrive.
"In roughly seven years in
Michigan, Ave Maria has become
a tremendously successful law
school," law school President and
Dean Bernard Dobranski said.
"The board believes significant
future success will be found in
southwest Florida where the law
school will be co-located with a
new and vibrant Catholic univer-
sity."
Thomas Monaghan, founder of
Ann Arbor-based Domino's Pizza
Inc., has pledged more than $250
million to construct Ave Maria Uni-
versity. The Florida school, located
between Naples and Immokalee,
is scheduled to open in the fall of
2009.

Ave Maria opened its doors in
2004 on an interim campus in
Naples, about 25 miles west. The
school graduated its first class in
2005. It currently has about 400
undergraduate students.
Monaghan, a former owner of
the Detroit Tigers, initially intend-
ed to build a permanent campus
for Ave Maria in Ann Arbor near
the Domino's headquarters, but
he couldn't secure the necessary
rezoning rights.
The new campus will be located
inthe town of Ave Maria, a self-con-
tained community being developed
by Monaghan, a devout Roman
Catholic.
Monaghan had said that busi-
nesses Ave Maria Town - the name

is Latin for Hail Mary - would be
restricted from selling products
that violated Catholic teachings on
issues like birth control and por-
nography.
"You won't be able to buya Play-
boy or Hustler magazine in Ave
Maria Town," Monaghan said at a
conference in 2004. "We're going
to control the cable television that
comes in the area. There's not
going to be any pornographic tele-
vision in Ave Maria Town. If you
go to the drugstore and you want
to buy the pill or the condoms or
contraception, you won't be able to
get that."
After the ACLU threatened law-
suits, though, Monaghan backped-
See AVE MARIA, page 7A

Abram may not play
in tonight's game

Captain arrested for
driving with
suspended license
By DANIEL BROMWICH
Daily Sports Editor
Michigan basketball officials
said senior captain Lester Abram's
status for tonight's game at Illinois

is uncertain. Abram was arrested
for driving with a
suspendedlicense
early Monday
morning.
Abram was
also ticketed for
speeding and for
failing to pro-
vide insurance ABRAM
when an officer
with the Ingham County Sheriff's
See ABRAM, page 7A

Before break,
long lines for
tans, treadmills

Iraq native Zainab Salbi speaks about women in war at the Mendelssohn Theater
yesterday
DISPATCHES FROM
THE HOME F'RONT

Salbi speaks about
plight of female
war victims
By EMILY BARTON
Daily StaffReporter
When Zainab Salbi describes
war, she doesn't describe the sol-
diers fighting on the front lines
- she describes the decision she
and her family had to make about
whether or not they should sleep
in the same room so they could die
together if a missile fell on their
house.

Growing up in Iraq during the
eight-year war with neighboring
Iran, Salbi witnessed war's toll on
civilians.
"We only talk about the front
side of war," Salbi said. "War for
me is about anything but the front
line."
Salbi spoke about war's effect on
women at the University's annual
William K. McInally memorial
lecture in almost filled Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater yesterday.
In 1993, Salbi founded Women
for Women International, an orga-
nization that helps female victims
of war.
See WAR, page 7A

'U' warns students
about parking,
heating
By DANIELLE KRUIZENGA
Daily Staff Reporter
With Spring Break just days
away, it's getting harder to look
good as students pack gyms and
tanning salons near campus.
Business School junior Rachel
Gutierrez, who plans to spend
next week on the beaches of Aca-
pulco, found this out first-hand
last weekend when she found her-
self fourth in line for a treadmill at
the Intramural Sports Building on
Hoover Street.
Gutierrez, who said she exer-
cises in the IM Building regularly,
was annoyed she had to wait in
line.
"I have never seen so many girls
waiting for treadmills," she said.
Cora Huscher, an employee at
Campus Tan on Church Street,
said the salon has been-doing brisk
business recently.

"Most people like to get a base
tan before they go away for break,"
she said. "Then they won't burn as
easily when they're in the sun."
But appointments are becom-
ing harder to find as the break
approaches.
"I used to be able to stop by the
tanning place when I had spare
time," Gutierrez said. "NowI have
to work it into my busy schedule."
Managers at two other local
tanning salons - Tanfastic and
Big House Tanning - said they
were too busy to comment.
Gutierrez isn't the only student
who has noticed more students
making their way to the gym as
Spring Break approaches.
LSAsophomore Evan Sands said
he thinks that some of their efforts
are to compensate for excessive
partying.
"Guys are just trying to work
their arms because that's what they
think looks good on the beach," he
said. "I've seen a lot of them work-
ing on their stomachs to burn off
all the Natty Lights they've been
drinking the past two months."
But LSA freshman Ryan Dolan

LSA sophomore Gwen Braude lies in a tanning bed at Big House Tanning on South
University Avenue yesterday.
said Spring Break wasn't student's pare for the break.
only motivation. The Office of the Vice President
"I think we're working out more for Student Affairs sent a caution-
just for our well-being," he said. "I ary e-mail to students yesterday
have definitely noticed a lot more reminding them to turn off appli-
people, though." ances and lock up before leaving
The University is urging stu- for break. The e-mail also includ-
dents to take other steps to pre- See SPRING BREAK, page 7A

TODAY'S HI: 38
WEATHER Lo: 27

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ON THE DAILY BLOGS
Detroit Tiger gives $100,000 to Mott Hospital
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/THE WIRE

INDEX NEW S..............
'a tylat5 O PINIO N .....
02t07 The M ch RanTai P .. .
aichioanailyeaa ARITS ......

...2A CLASSIFIEDS......................6A
...4A SPORTS ................... 8A
....5A THESTATEMENT.................1B

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