100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 2007 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

CENTER OF ATTENTION

PROTESTERS
From page LA
shop - a punishment considered by
many activists to be too lax.
Jen Hsu, co-chair of the Michi-
gan Student Assembly's Lesbian,
Gay, Bisexual and Transgender
Commission and organizer of yes-
terday's protest, said her primary
goal was to expose the public to
injustice.
"The main thing is education
through visibility," she said.
At a press conference after the
game, which Michigan won 55-41,
Portland didn't acknowledge the
protest. When asked if she saw the
purple shirts in the crowd, Port-
land said, "No, I'm only blue and
white."
Nicole Stallings, president of
the Michigan Student Assembly,
which teamed up with the Uni-
versity's Office of Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual and Transgender Affairs
for yesterday's event, also donned
a purple shirt.
"I think it's really good to show
that it's not acceptable behavior,"
Stallings said.
At the entrance of CrislerArena,
three students in "Lavender Men-
ace" shirts handed out small pur-
ple flyers explaining their cause.
They also sold rubber rainbow
bracelets, purple ribbons, and T-
shirts..
Inside the arena, the protesters
crowded two main seating sec-
tions. Others sat throughout the
stadium.
Not all protesters were students
at the University - high school stu-
dents sat among elderly citizens in
protest.
Veronica Cisneros, a gradu-
ate student in the School of Social
Work, who is straight, said she
jumped at the opportunity to sup-
port the event.
"Everything that social justice
seeks to equalize, that's what I
believe in," Cisneros said.
Ann Arbor resident Diane Noth-
aft, who helped organize the event,
said she considered the situation
"shocking" and "maddening."
Because the protesters didn't
carry signs or chant slogans, and
the only shouts of anger came when
the referee called traveling on a
Michigan player with seven min-
utes left in the game, some fans
weren't even aware that a protest
was taking place.
Some people in the crowd were
intrigued, Hsu said.
"So many people have been ask-
ing me what it's all about," she said.
Kath Borg, the mother of a Mich-
igan cheerleader and who was not a
part of the protest, said she thought
the protest was effective and sup-
ported the cause. "I tend to agree
with the ladies in lavender," she
said.
-Dan Feldman contributed
to this report

WIRELESS
From page LA
afflicted computers to the show-
case to be fixed.
"We've been dealing with it for at
least a year," he said. "That's one of
the things the Computer Showcase
is for."
Fortunately for Apple owners,
the technological malfunction
doesn't affect Macintosh com-
puters. Tishhouse said Intel had
already corrected the problem by
the time Apple started using Intel
processors in its computers last

summer.
Musbach's dilemma was never
completely resolved. After visiting
the showcase twice and installing
two different drivers, her laptop
still won't work. Computer Show-
case employees said her computer
might not be compatible with the
University's wireless network,
Musbach said.
Musbach said she thought
the University should bear some
responsibility for the compatibility
problem.
"Can't this be cut two ways?" she
asked.
Some computer owners have

Monday, January 8, 2007 - 7A
had more success than Mus-
bach, though. Other students
have enjoyed improvements after
upgrading their drivers.
Kinesiology junior Monica Sil-
vian experienced problems with
the wireless network in the Under-
graduate Library and the Graduate
Library, so she decided to take her
Dell laptop to the Computer Show-
case.
After installing the new drivers,
she was able to use the wireless net-
work.
"It was fixed, and they gave me
instructions about what to do from
there on," she said.

CHARLEY'S
From page 1
are wondering whether they have
lost their jobs for good.
"We don't know if we were laid
off," Crooms said. "We just came
back and it was closed."
Crooms, who has worked at Char-
ley's for three years, said worried
employees have been contacting him
in their search for answers. Many
of them want to know whether they
will receive their paychecks fromthe
bar's last few weeks of business.
Both Crooms a and University
alum Brian Yeager, also a manager
at Charley's, said Buhr's nephew,
Joe Hahn, told them during the
bar's last week of operation that it
wouldn't be reopening in January.

Hahn is also a manager at Char-
ley's.
Crooms and Yeager said they
tried to spread the world to as many
employees as they could, but some
had left early for the break and oth-
ers were unavailable.
Yeager said that once Charley's
employees learned the business
was for sale, many began to worry
about their job security, and some
stopped coming to work altogether.
"As soon as people found out, we
had a dramatic loss of employees,"
Yeager said, "At one point I think
we had one server who was sched-
uled even show up for their shift,
out of six or seven servers."
Even with a decline in the num-
ber of employees, Yeager estimated
that between 40 and 50 people are
unemployed because of the bar's

closing.
"I'm currently jobless and every-
body else is too, so it's a sad situa-
tion," Crooms said.
Owners of other popular near-
campus establishments have
expressed interest in the property,
according to one potential buyer
who wished to remain anonymous
because the sale was still pending.
Yeager speculates that the bar's
ownershipmaybe "testingthewaters"
to see what the business is worth, and
that the sale of the business may not
even occur. He said he is optimistic
about the bar's future, regardless of
whetherit changeshands.
"I think there's a pretty good
chance that it's going to stay Good
Time Charley's and keep the name,
rather than become something
else," he said.

AtLSON G, HAiAN/baily
LSA sophomores Jason Wu and Anastasia Alekseyev teach members of the Univer-
sity Ballroom Dance Team in the Michigan Union ballroom on Saturday night.

PRAYER
From page LA
write their sins on their hands in
red marker and wash them away in
the bowl.
A world map was taped to one
wall. Underneath it were sheets of
star stickers for students to mark
the areas they've prayed for.
"It's when we pray that God
moves and I believe things on
this campus will change with our
prayer," LSA junior Michelle Hol-
liday said.

Michael said he hopes the event
will send a different message than
the one espoused this fall on the
Diag by radical Christian preachers
who made headlines by screaming
about their hatred for gay people
and others.
"Our foundation is that God
loves us and cares for us, not that
he is going to condemn is, but that
he sent his son for us," Michael said.
"Even though we would be classi-
fied in the same genre as the Diag
preachers, our approach is a loving
one. We seek unification -not sepa-
ration."

Stuy: ween girls more
likely than teens to be fat
WASHINGTON (AP) - As if to creeping waistlines and poor Participants were called ir
being a tween weren'thard enough, dietary habits, particularly in this early 20s to check their weig
scientists now call it an age when age group, said Dr. Denise Simons- Some 7.4 percent of the
girls are especially at risk of get- Morton of the National Insti- . girls and 17.4 percent of the
ting fat. tutes of Health, which funded the already were overweight by
Girls were more likely to become research. year through age 12, between
overweight between age 9 and 12 "It seems tobe a particularly vul- cent and 5 percent of the rem
than during their teenage years, nerable period," said Simons-Mor- girls became overweight, re
researchers report today in The ton, who heads obesity-prevention Douglas Thompson of the
Journal of Pediatrics. efforts at the NIH's National Heart, land Medical Research In
The study could not say what Lung and Blood Institute. the paper's lead author.
that was and did not examine boys Some 17 percent of U.S. young- After the girls reached 1
to know if they face a similar risk, sters are obese and millions more cases leveled off to between
But it did highlight consequenc- are overweight, a problem affecting cent and 2 percent a year.
es of that adolescent weight gain.. all ages. Overweight children are at Other research has show
Chubby tweens already were seeing risk of developing diabetes andthey the preteen years are when
their blood pressure and cholester- grow into overweight adults who, sters switch from heedin
ol levels inch up, backing up earlier in turn, develop heart disease and ents' dietary advice to eati
research that fat's toll on the arter- other ailments. their friends do, Simons-I
ies begins early. Also, being over- The study tracked more than said. Less physical activity
weight in childhood brought More 2,300 white and black girls start- role, too. She recalls from h.
than a 10-fold risk of a youngster's ing at age 9. Researchers measured daughters' tween years long
growing into a fat adult. height, weight, blood pressure and tary hours on the phone an
Parents should pay attention cholesterol every year through 18. ries about gettingsweaty.

n their
ht.
white
blacks
9. Each
n 2 per-
aining
ported
Mary-
stitute,
2, new
1 per-
n that
young-
g par-
ng like
Morton
plays a
er own
seden-
d wor-

Washington subway
derails, injuring 20

WASHINGTON (AP) - A sub-
way train derailed yesterday near
downtown Washington, sending 20
people to the hospital and prompt-
ing the rescue of 60 people from a
tunnel, officials said.
The accident happened at about
3:45 p.m. near the underground
Mount Vernon Square station,
which serves two lines beneath the

Washington ConventIon Center,
Metro spokeswoman Cathy Asato
said. There were about 150 people
on the train.
At least one person had a seri-
ous but not life-threatening injury,
Asato said. The other injuries were
mostly "bumps and bruises," and
one of those with minor injuries
was pregnant.

HEMINGWAY WAS A REPORTER FIRST.
WRITE FOR THE DAILY. NEWS@MICHIGANDAILY.COM

the michigan daily
NICE RMS. FOR Rent in a new 6 STUDIOS
bdrm. furn. apt. Near main campus. All on UM C
util. & internet incl. Avail. Jan. 07. $580- 734-662-5
/ mo. Flex. Leases. Call: 734-418-2050, www.mich
www.828Greeneapts.com
THE CH
NORTH CAMPUS 1 & 2 bdrms., pri- 4 Bdrm.
vate balcony, FREE shuttle to central, ing Rm.
fitness & much more. AVAIL. furn.160
IMMED.! 741-9300. Loft a
annarborapartments.net flrs. Cath
NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS heat, furn
FOR 07/08
Campus Realy
Formally Campus Rentals. WA
New Name, same Great Location, Wa
Quality and Service. Stop in & pick up 7 Mai
our listings for 2007-2008 school yr. 769-23k.
1335 S. University 769-2344
734-665-8825
www.campusrealty.com
ON CAMPUS APTS.
Get 1 month FREE
On All May Leases
Studio, 1 & 2 bedrooms
734-761-2680. -
OUR RATES ARE STILL GREAT, 21
Sh
But don't wait.
Great Apts. & Great Deals
Won't last long.
Univenity Towers
734-761-2680.
PARK TERRACE APTS
848 Tappan
1 &,2 BR Apts. Furnished
Close to Law & Business School
New Kitchens w/Dishwasher DRUNK
Underground Parking and all o
Varsity Management Bower, P.
(734) 668.1100
INTROA
PEPPER'S PROPERTIES 3 bdrm. Thurs. ev
apartments on East U. Furnished, hard- Six week
wood firs., prkg. avail., heat and water 15PM, Y
included. $1575. 810-231-0229. OR Jan.
Temple, (
ROOM FOR RENT for student or pro- Temldd(a
fessional. $550+util. 734.646.1748. a2buddha
SEPT. LEASE - 4 bdrm. house, 2 bath, PRIVAT
4 prkg. spots, central air, near Business LAW SC
& Law school. $2450/mo. Free wash- My creden
er/dryer incl. Max 5 people. Call - perfect I
312-543-0741. - Michiga
- licensed
SPACIOUS 5 BDRM. apt. avail. Sept. - 14 years
A/C., modern kitch., free ldry. & prkg. - hundreds
Shahtiger@hotmail.com 734.665.2723. 734.996.2

URCH@ 1131 Church Street.
2 bath. 2 story great rm. Din-
New wood firs. Prkg., ldry.,
0 sq. ft. Eff. with

vets.
dical
ence.

r,
1
T

nd office. New wood
hedral Ceilings. Prkg., dry.,
1. _
734-741-5021
qrmaa@comcast.net $10.00/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND
now hiring. Great Resume Builder! Ap-
LDEN MANAGEMENT ply a@ telefird.umich.edu or 763-8180.
nSi. 6-Brdnm. 3-Baths. Foiot-
SSept. 2007. $27 at. Fo t-A GIFT BEYOND measure. Be an Egg
or tchprovide.ne IDonor.E arn $6,000! Must be 20-28
years of age, height/weight proportion-
s- ate, and a non-smoker. Please call:
-wAlternative Reproductive Resources at
248-723-9979.

BRIGHT ENERGETIC SITTER
needed for 8 yr. old girl. Mon.-Fri.
6:30-8:15a.m. After school care also a
possibility if interested. Reliable trans.
req. 734-417-4161.
DRIV ER/SITTER TOPICKup kids af-
ter school & watch for 2 hrs. 761-9526.
ENERGETIC, LOVING BABYSIT-
TER to care for toddler in our Ani Ar-
her home. Wed. and Fri. mornings.
Mast have owndtransportation. Refer-
ences required. 734-834-1261.
PART-TIME BABYSITTERNEEDED
for 4 yr. old girl. Occasional time with
boys, 8 & 9. Primarily 12-5 pm 2-3
days/wk. flex. 10 min. from campus.
Contact drfeey plymouthortho.com
DON'T MISS OUT! Spring Break2007
is approaching and STS is offering spe-
cials to this year's hottest destinations!
Call for savings 1.800.648.4849 or visit
www.ststravel.com
VISIT LONDON ENGLAND 2007
Spring Break! $599/ person. Bed and
breakfast, free drinks oight, sightseeing
tour & river cruise! 1-800-599-8635.
salesasprirgbreaklondon.com
www.springbreaklondon.com

OLD WEST SIDE -
BR apt. New Kitchen
hort Term Lease Avail.
Varsity Management
(734) 668.1100

DRIVING DEFENSE. $500
ther traffic matters call David
C. at 313-333-0309.
MEDITATION COURSE, 5
es., 6:15-8:30, starts Jan. I1.
Yoga I starts Jan. 9, 6:15-7:-
oga II, starts Jan. 9, 7:30-9PM
11, 7-8:30PM. Zen Buddhist
734) 761-6520 or
@sbcglobal.net
E TUTORING FOR LSAT,
HOOL, BAR, EXAM
ntials:
180 on LSAT
n Law graduate (3.85 GPA)
attorney
of teaching experience
s of delighted students
861 www.TESTGURUcom

COACHES WANTED.
$13-20 per hour. Looking for strong,
dependable individuals to assist in spot.
ting student athletes. Will train. Mike
517-402-3129. ostuimbling yahoo.com
LAW FIRM SEEKS: Part-time legal as-
sistant. Must be available to work
mornings, 6-8 hours/week throughout
the year. Send resume and morning
availability to: staffee(wccomcast.net
MYSTERY SHOPPERS
1-ran op1 0 ~5 per dry. tsp.iot tRe-
quiired. Unidercoser Shoppers Needed
to Judge Retail and Dining Establish-
ments. Call 800-722-4791.
PART-TIME TEACHERS NEEDED
GRETCHEN'S HOUSE, a group of
NAEYC accredited child care ceunters,
seeks enthusiastic persons to work in
our 7 Ann Arbor locations. Flexible
hours available. Now hiring: Afternoon
shool-age staff ani Substitutes. tsr
irore roticall (734) 761-25.76 or email
inquiries to
mdavis a gretchenshouse.com EOE.
PRE-SCHOOL GYMNASTICS IN-
STRUCTORS-ENTHUSIASTIC, reli-
able instructors needed to teach morn-
ing and afternoon pre-school classes.
Gymnastics and previous teaching ex-
perience necessary. Call Gym America
971-1667.

ARIES
(March 21to April 19)
You have the energy to get a lot of
work done today. Make the most of this!
You can study or explore what you might
normally consider to be difficult sub-
jects. (It's a good day to make travel
plans as well.)
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20) '
Now is the time to tackle a lot of those
red-tape details you've been putting off.
Pay some bills. Take care of loose ends
connected with insurance matters, debt,
taxes and similar items.
GEMINI
(May 21to June 20)
You can work very well in partnership
with others today. People will be grateful
that you're doing more than your fair
share. You just want results.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
This is an excellent day at work. It's a
good time to do work where you have to
keep plugging away, because today you
have lots of patience and motivation to
finish your task.
LEO
(July 23to Aug. 22)
You won't mind increased responsibil-
ities with children today. You are very
patient, especially when it comes to
teaching someone something.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23to Sept. 22)
This is an excellent day to clean where
you live or help family members in
tough tasks. Nothing will daunt you
today. You just want to get the job done.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Choose work that requires concentra-
tion and attention to detail. Even if it's
boring work, you'll do it today. (You

might as well make the most of this
opportunity.)
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
This is a good day to size up your
assets and figure out what you own and
what you owe. You're very serious about
your financial situation.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22to Dec. 21)
Whatever you do today, you will ask
yourself, "How useful is this?" You're
concerned with practical results, and
you're not afraid to do difficult, exacting
work.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22to Jan. 19)
This is an excellent day to do boring
research. You will work at a controlled,
regular pace. No matter how difficult
your task, you will persevere in it.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
Join forces with others today to
accomplish what you need to do. Others
will be amazed at your perseverance and
dogged energy.
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Your ambition is strong today! You're
willing to do the homework necessary to
attain the results you want in the future.
YOU BORN TODAY You're intense
about whatever you do. It's curious, but
inevitably what you do often influences
others. Sometimes you're an overnight
success. You always do your homework
before any importntevent. This helpsto
give you a feeling of confidence. In the
year ahead, some activities of the past
decade will end in order to create room
for something new to enter.
Birthdate of: David Bowie, singer;
Stephen Hawking, physicist; Boris
Vallejo, artist.

GLORIFY GOD WINTER RECEP-
TION! PRIZES, GIVE-A-WAYS,
FOOD & FUN TUESDAY, JAN-
UARY 9TH (@ 7 P.M. IN THE
UNION'S PENDLETON RM. ALL
ARE WELCOME -YOU DON'T
WANT TO MISS THIS EVENT!

A

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan