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February 12, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STI I I N THE HUNT APPLES IN STEREO
~II L II Ill~ flINVENTIVE INDIE ROCKERS
BREAK NEW GROUND IN
MEN'S HOOPS DEFEATS MINNESOTA, LATEST EFFORT
KEEPS BIG DANCE HOPES ALIVE SPORTSMONDAY ARTS, PAGE 5A

Ann Arbor, Michigan

www.nichigandaily.com~

Monday, February 12, 20C

HARRIETT WOODS - 1927-2007
First woman to
edit Daily dies

Woods went on
to become first
female Lt. Gov. of
Missouri
By EMILY BARTON
Daily StaffReporter
Harriett Woods, The
Michigan Daily's first
female top editor and the
first female former lieuten-
ant gov-
ertor of
Missouri,
died of
leukemia
Thursday.
She was
79.
Woods WOODS
served as the Daily's editor
in 1949 - when the Michigan
Union was still off-limits to
women and the Daily had a
separate "women's editor."
"She had an extraordinary
experience (at the Daily),"
said her son Andrew Woods.
"It changed her life."
Andrew Woods said her
time at the University and at
the Daily taught her how to

use her personality to estab-
lish friendships and partner-
ships.
Woods - whose maiden
name was Friedman - grad-
uated from the University
with a bachelor's degree in
philosophy.
Many of the editors and
writers who worked for her
at the Daily were men, her
son said. Harriett Woods told
the Muleskinner, the stu-
dent newspaper of Central
Missouri State University,
in October that her experi-
ence at the Daily was forma-
tive because while there she
supervised male reporters
and editors.
"I thought I was on top of
the world; I was managing
men," Woods said. "But when
I went out into the real world,
those men got jobs, and I
didn't."
When Woods applied for
newspaper jobs, she was only
offered positions as a society
writer, her son said.
Eventually she found work
with The St. Louis Globe-
Democrat, but her challenges
as a woman stayed with her
and shaped her career in
politics.

Woods worked at the
Globe-Democrat until she
was married in 1953 to Jim
Woods.
Once married, she began
working in politics by a twist
of fate.
While living in the St.
Louis suburb of University
City, Woods galvanized her
neighborhood by starting a
petition to close a street to
traffic during construction
because the noise kept her
children from sleeping.
Soon thereafter, she won
a seat on the city council,
where she focused on nurs-
ing-home reform and drunk-
driving legislation.
Andrew Woods said his
mother was passionate
about social justice and tried
to encourage groups like
women and minorities who
were underrepresented in
government.
Her son said that every
time his mother tried to run
for office, she was told that
a female candidate wouldn't
be able to garner support.
Andrew Woods said
his mother was passion-
ate about social justice and
See WOODS, page 7A

Michael Smith (left), LSA sophomore Tom Ritz
auditorium on Washtenaw Road yesterday.

NEW HOME FOR NEW LIFE

After long wait,
Campus Christian
church moves into new
space on Washtenaw
By EMILY ANGELL
Daily StaffReporter
Rock music vibrated through the
crowd. Audience members, most
of them college students casually
dressed in jeans, swayed to the beat of
a Christian band called "The Worship
Team" as they held open cell phones
like lighters at a Phish concert.

For the first time since it was estab-
lished in the mid-1980s, New Life
Church has a home. The non-denomi-
national Protestant congregation held
its inaugural service yesterday morn-
ing at its permanent auditorium on
Washtenaw Avenue.
The new space, which can hold
about 400 people, will also serve as a
theater for nearby Angell Elementary
School. In exchange, New Life mem-
bers will be able to use the school's
parking lot.
In 2002, the group bought the
abandoned Delta Zeta sorority house
to convert it into a meeting place. It
faced resistance from neighbors who
said the building would bring unwant-

ed crowds and noise to the area.
"It's been eight years in the mak-
ing," New Life Pastor Steve Hayes
said. "We were pushed around over
the years."
New Life started as a student group
in the mid-1980s and began holding
prayer meetings in University build-
ings in January of 1998. Later that
year, the University banned New Life
from using University buildings on
weekends, saying the group posed a
security threat.
TheUniversityequivocatedin2000
and allowed New Life to use the audi-
toriums in the Modern Languages
Building. New Life leaders soon real-
See NEW LIFE, page 7A

INTELLIGENCE SYM POSI U M
Former CIA lawyer
blasts Bush, Pentagon

WAITING ON A PRAYER
New Cife's rise at the University

Alum: "failures of
* integrity"
preceded Iraq
invasion
By DANIEL TRUMP
Dailyastaff reporter
Although he had to sub-
mit his speech to the CIA
for approval, former CIA top
lawyer Jeffrey Smith didn't
seem to pull any punches in
criticizing the Bush adminis-
tration in a speech at the Law
School on Friday.
Smith, general counsel to
the CIA for 16 months in the
mid-1990s, criticized what
he called "failures of integri-
ty" by the Pentagon and Bush
administration in the lead-up
to the Iraq invasion.

A 1971 graduate of the Uni-
versity Law School,Smith was
the keynote speaker at a two-
day symposium sponsored
by the Michigan Journal of
International Law called
"State Intelligence Gathering
and International Law."
He said the intelligence
failures that led the Bush
administration to argue that
Iraq possessed weapons of
mass destruction occurred
because the government
crossed the line between
intelligence gathering and
policymaking.
"Whether that was the
result of poor tradecraft on
the part of analysts or politi-
cal pressure from the White
House is debatable," Smith
said. "My ownview is that it's
some of each, but at its base
it's a failure of integrity."
Smith said the law ensures

the integrity of the intelli-
gence-gatheringprocess.
"Lawyers and judges
have a special responsibility
to make the system work,"
he said. "If our integrity
fails, the system fails. If our
system fails, our country
'fails."
Smith stood tall and digni-
fied at the podium. He chose
his words more carefully
than most - he has to have all
public remarks approved by
the CIA - but didn't appear
to be pulling any punches as
he leveled his criticism at the
Bush administration.
on the issue of detainees
of the United States's war on
terrorism, Smith had direct
condemnation for the Presi-
dent personally.
The Bush administra-
tion has held some detain-
See CIA, page 7A

New Lifi
the Uni
1984

Ann Arbor Planning Commis-
sion rejects New Life's build-
e Church founded at University allows New Life ing plans by a 5 to 3 vote. The
versity to use Modern Language city later relented after the
Building auditoriams "] charchlthreatened a lawsait.
lan. 1998 j 2002 2007
J 2000 2004
New Life starts holding services in University buildings. Later New Life purchases thetformer New
that year, the administration bans group from using University Delta Zeta sorority house on church
buildings on weekends, arguingthat they posea security threat WashtenawAvenue opens

Harvard names its
first female president

TEA FOR TWO

Radcliffe dean to her repeatedly, "It's a man's
world, sweetie, and the soon-
lead nation's er you learn that the better
off you'll be."
oldest university Instead, Faust left home
at an early age, heading
By SARA RIMER north to be educated at Con-
The New York Times cord Academy, a girls' prep
school in Massachusetts,
Recallinghercomingof age and at Bryn Mawr College,
as the only girl in a privileged, a woman's college known
tradition-bound family in for creating future leaders,
Virginia horse country, Drew and to rise as a leading Civil
Gilpin Faust, 59, has often War scholar. And yesterday,
spoken of through the convergence of
her con- sweeping changes in higher
tinued education, her own achieve-
confronta- ments and the resignation
tions with under pressure of Harvard's
hermother previous president, she
"about the became the first woman
require- FAUST appointed to lead the Ivy
ments League university since its
of what she usually called founding in 1636.
femininity." Her mother, "One of the things that I
Catharine, she has said, told think characterizes my gen-

eration - that characterizes
me, anyway and others of
my generation - is that I've
alwaysbeensurprised by how
my life turned out," Faust
said in an interview yester-
day at Loeb House just after
the university announced
that she would become its
28th president, effective July
1. "I've always done more
than I ever thought I would.
Becoming a professor - I
never would have imagined
that - writing books - I
never would have imagined
that - getting a Ph.D. - I'm
not sure I would even have
imagined that. I've lived my
life a step at a time. Things
sort of happened."
Yesterday morning, she
said, she found herself lying
in bed thinking, "Today I
think they're going to vote
See HARVARD, page 7A

COULD COLEMAN HAVE
GONE TO CAMBRIDGE?
Although University President Mary
Sue Coleman repeatedly said she wasn't
interested in the Harvard presidency,
she seemed a perfectfit.
Harvard insiders told The NewtYork
Times last month that the univerdity
was lookingfor apresident with experi-
ence in academia. The experts also said
Harvard was likely to choose a woman
for thetfirsttime in the school's history
- in paty healithe woundsocaused by
previous president Lawrence Summer's
controversial suggestion that women
might be innately inferior infields like
math and science.
That's exactly the type of candidate
they chose.
Drew Gilpin Faust, whose selection
as Harvard's next president was made
otticial yesterday. is a careernacademic.
It could have been Coleman, though.
Coleman was an accomplished chem-
ist before she made the transition to
administrative work and was herself the
first female president of the University
of Michigan.
Although Coleman's name appeared
on several lists oflcandidates, with one
gambling site listing her odds of becom-
ing Harvard's next preidentat-to-1,
she signed atfive-year extension on hen
contract last summer.
"I'm notgoing anywhere," she said
in an interview with The Michigan Daily
in the fall.
GABE NELSON

ALLIsON GHAMAN/Dai
Alexa Zielinski (right) and Cheryl Morris (left) at a Victorian Valentine's Day Tea at the historic Kempf
House on South Division Street.

TODAY'S His:25
WEATHER LO: 9

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INDEX NEWS......
vol.CXVIl,No.96 SUD0KU..
(2007The Michigan Daily
michivvndaily.com OP INIDON-

.2A ARTS................A.....A
.3A CLASSIFIE.D................6A
..4A SPORTSMONDAY.................16

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