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February 09, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DICKSON: WHEN BEING
YOURSELF ISN'T ENOUGH
OPINION, PAGE 4

NOT TALKING RETIREMENT BASEMENT ARTS TAKES ON
'A FEW GOOD MEN'
LLOYD CARR SAYS HE'S NOT GOING ANYWHERE SPORTS, PAGE 8 ARTS, PAGE 5

(Iie 11c114an DaIl
..I $. .%NHN RE II SEIN TEN YEA N I I I lT)RIAL FEEI I.I 1I

Ann Arbor, Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

riday, February 9, 2007

MAKING WAY FOR NORTH QUAD

POKING THE NEXT
PHOTOS FROM FACEBOOK COM
2008 White House hopefuls are using social networking
sites to reach young voters like you
By Kirsty McNamara ( Daily Staff Reporter

aEN! DELL/Daily
TOP: A fence outside of the Frieze Building, on which demolition begins today. BOTTOM: Crews having
already been removing hazardous materials from the 99-year-old building.
The rise and allo
the Frieze Building

When he is not concentrating on
"winning the war against jihadists,"
former Massachusetts governor and
likely Republican presidential candi-
date Mitt Romney enjoys waterski-
ing and listening to The Eagles. The
Michigan native enjoys books like
"The Four Obsessions of An Extraor-
dinary Executive" by Patrick Len-
cioni. At least, that's what his official
Facebook.com profile says.
As the 2008 presidential election
heats up, many contenders are try-
ing to energize student voters by cre-
ating profiles on social networking
websites like Facebook and MySpace.
com.
On Feb. 5, Romney became the
first potential 2008 Republican presi-
dential candidate with a Facebook
profile. His exploratory committee
posted the profile.
.. . . ........... --.... ..... ...... ... -.
BY THE NUMBERS
243, 3
Members in the Face-
book group called "Barack
Obama (One Million
Strong for Barack)"

"Facebook can absolutely be an
effective way of organizing events
and different activities on college
campuses across the country," said
Alex Burgos, a spokesman for the
Romney campaign.
Romney agreed.
"It goes without saying that tech-
nology is revolutionizing the way
political campaigns are run in Amer-
ica," he said in a written statement.
"Facebook is just one part of our
broader effort to mobilize the grass-
roots network in cyberspace."
Although Romney is the first
Republican presidential hopeful to
launch a Facebook profile, spokes-
people from other presidential cam-
paigns have also recognized the
importance of online social networks
for reaching student voters.
Danny Diaz, a spokesman for Sen.

John McCain (R-Ariz.), said social
networking sites and interactive
blogs have revolutionized the politi-
cal process.
"We will be putting up a Facebook
profile in the near future," he said
in a written statement. "Once the
Senator makes a decision concerning
his candidacy and begins travel, the
site will be updated often from the
road."
Three Democratic frontrunners,
John Edwards, Barack Obama and
Hillary Clinton, all have Facebook
profiles.
The official Facebook profiles of
candidates are separate from inde-
pendent Facebook groups supporting
particular candidates or issues. Stu-
dents from across the country have
created hundreds of groups support-
See CAMPAIGN, page 7

Demolition of
historic building
to begin today
By JESSICAVOSGERCHIAN
Daily StaffReporter
The Frieze Building, long
one of campus's most com-
plained about but beloved
structures, is slated for demo-
lition today. It was 99 years
old.
The Frieze is being leveled
to make room for a younger,
flashier building - a resi-
dence hall called North Quad.
It will remain standing in the
memories of the community
members and alumni who
loved it, though.
"It will always be in my
memory as it is now," Univer-
sity alum Jacqueline Wood
said. "It was flawed, rusty and
falling apart - and there was
the asbestos thing - but for
me it was perfect."
Last April, Wood organized
"Frieze Frame," a presenta-
tion of images, videos and
audio clips about the events
and people connected to the
building since it was built in
1907.
Wood decided to create the

project after she heard the
Frieze would be demolished.
Afilmandvideostudiesmajor,
Wood had spent much of her
four years at the University in
the Frieze's classrooms and
studios.
The University bought the
building in 1956 and named
it after Henry Frieze, who
served as interim president
in 1880 and 1887 while then-
President James Angell was
on diplomatic missions. The
building's original tenant
was Ann Arbor Public High
School.
Walking through the
courtyard of the soon-to-be
demolished Frieze, it's hard to
imagine that it once rangwith
the chatter of high school stu-
dents. There's no echo of the
applause that once met per-
formances in the building's
theaters and production stu-
dios.

In recent years, the Frieze
has garnered a reputation of
being cold and uncomfortable
among students in concentra-
tions like communications as
well as theater and drama,
both of which held many of
their classes in the building.
In the months leading up to
its demolition, the Frieze was
a gutted, dilapidated frame of
its former self.
The construction crew has
already started chipping away
at the building's outer walls,
removing the asbestos-ridden
caulking and lead-based paint
from the Frieze's windowsills
and walls.
The large-scale demolition
isn't sending the Frieze out
with a bang, though. Instead
of using a wrecking ball,
workers will bring the build-
ing down in sections over sev-
eral weeks, said Diane Brown,
See FRIEZE, page 7

3 289
Members in "Romney
2008"

41,188
Members in "ANTI Hillary
Clinton for president '08"
All figures as of 12:40 this morning.

STATE FUNDING
University funding
gets boost from state

MISSION FROM MARS

MAKING CAMPUS GREEN
MSA to 'U': buy
renewable energy

Increase doesn't
keep pace with
inflation
By ALESE BAGDOL
Daily StaffReporter
Easing worries that she
would cut University fund-
ing to help offset the state's
looming $800 million deficit,
Gov. Jennifer Granholm pro-
posed a 2.5 percent increase
in funding for state universi-
ties in a preliminary budget
released yesterday.
Granholm said the $36.6
million increase will help
keep the state competitive.
"This budget continues
the trend of investing record
amounts in education," Gra-
nholm said. "In order to be
a better Michigan, we must
continuetoinvestinoneofour

greatest economic catalysts
-our public schools and insti-
tutions of higher learning."
Funding for the Univer-
sity could also increase dur-
ing negotiations between
Granholm and the state leg-
islature.
Last year, Granholm pro-
posed a 2-percent boost
in University funding but
increased it to 3 percent
under pressure from the
state House of Represen-
tatives. Last year's budget
was the first since 2001 that
increased funding to the Uni-
versity.
University Spokeswoman
Kelly Cunningham praised
Granholm's commitment to
education.
"We are pleased that the
governor's budget proposal
recognizes the importance
of investing in education as
a foundation for future eco-

nomic success," Cunning-
ham said.
The increase in funding for
the University won't keep up
with inflation, though. Infla-
tion currently hovers around
3 percent.
Inflation has outpaced
funding increases for the
past several years, forcing the
University to raise tuition.
Cunningham said it is too
early to know for certain
how the University Board of
Regents will adjust tuition
this year.
The regents usually vote on
tuition rates in the summer.
"We will be looking at the
details and look forward to
working with the governor
and the legislature in the
months ahead," Cunning-
ham said.
Tuition and state appro-
priations make up the largest
See BUDGET, page 7

Group wants 100
percent green
energy by 2011
By EMILY ANGELL
Daily StaffReporter
The University currently
purchases only 0.3 percent
of its electricity from renew-
able resources. The Michigan
Student Assembly passed a
resolution Tuesday night
urging the administration to
change that.
The MSA Environmental
Issues Commission, which
recommended the resolution,
said MSA's support is the first
step in changing the Univer-
sity's stance on renewable
energy purchases. Now the
Environmental Issues Com-
mission must gain the sup-
port of University President
Mary Sue Coleman and the

rest of the administration.
The resolution comes
amid growing concern about
climate change.
In 2005, the University
purchased 497,300,000 kilo-
watt-hours of electricity at a
cost of $76 million, up from
$52 million the previous
year. A significant amount of
the electricity the University
consumes is purchased from
the University Central Power
Plant on Huron Street, which
burns natural gas and fuel
oil.
Dean of Students Sue
Eklund was noncommittal
when asked about the pro-
posal.
"Sustainability is impor-
tant for the University, and
we always try to look for
a good mix between what
state funding allows and
what we can do for the envi-
ronment," she said. "That
See MSA, page 7

Rob Bell, the founding pastor of Mars Hill Bible Church in Grand Rapids,
answers questions while on tour promoting his book, "Sex God: Exploring
the Endless Connections Between Sexuality And Spirituality" last night at
the Power Center.

TODAY'S HI:21
WEATHER LO 9

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