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January 30, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IMRAN SYED: WHY GORE,
EDWARDS BEAT HILLARY, OBAMA
OPINION, PAGE 4

A DYNAMIC EVOLUTION PETWAY A FORCE OFF THE
COURT, TOO
OF MONTREAL GOES AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL ARTS, PAGE5 SPORTS, PAGE 9

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An g-b-,. w.Wmichigandailycom esc -a yK. C200
Event billed as speech by
. A week later,

ex-terrorists araws ire

Groups plan to
walk out on event
at Rackham
By DANIEL TRUMP
For the Daily
Although Zachariah Anani
is being billed as one of three
ex-terrorists who will speak
at 7 p.m. in Rackham Audito-
rium tonight, he said the label
doesn't apply to him.
"I wasn't a terrorist," he
said. "I was only a militant

fighter ina civil war."
The University's chap-
ter of Young Americans for
Freedom, a right-wing stu-
dent group, is sponsoring the
event. In promotional materi-
als for tonight's event, Anani,
Walid Shoebat and Kamal
Saleem are referred to as for-
mer terrorists.
"They created this pic-
ture," Anani said.
The event has drawn alle-
gations of hate speech from
the Michigan office of the
American-Arab Anti-Dis-
crimination Committee,

"It's not correct. They're giving
terrorism a religion. Terrorism is
a concept, you can't put a face or a
religion on it."
- Kamelya Youssef, co-founder of the Arab Unity
Movement

he is worried about the effect
this event will have on the
public impression of Islam.
"We can't take terrorists
and put them through rehab
and make them role models,"
Hamad said. "We can't do
extreme makeover on terror-
ists."
Anani was born in Leba-
non. When he was a teenager,
he joined a small, local group
of militant youths at the age
of 13, supported by the Pales-
tinian Liberation Organiza-
tion, he said. Anani claims to
See EX-TERRORISTS, page 7

picking up

whose representatives asked
the University administra-
tion to block it. *
Members of the American-
Arab Anti-Discrimination
Committee met with Univer-
sity administrators to voice

their concerns yesterday
afternoon. But the event will
go on as scheduled.
Imad Hamad, the Ameri-
can-Arab Anti-Discrimi-
nation Committee's state
director for Michigan, said

Groups formed to
study recovery
By KATHERINE MITCHELL
Daily StaffReporter
State, University and city
leaders met yesterday morn-
ing to discuss the future of
Ann Arbor without Pfizer.
The group announced the
creation of the Pfizer Strate-
gic Working Action Teams to
brainstorm and implement
ideas for the development of
the 177-acre Pfizer complex
that borders the University's
North Campus. Seven dif-
ferent committees will each
study a different aspect of
the economic and personnel
issues that surfaced after the
world's largest pharmaceuti-
cal manufacturer announced
it would leave the state,
eliminating 2,100 jobs in Ann
Arbor.
After only a week of
preparation, the committee
announced its plan in a press
conference at the Michigan
Informational Technology
Center yesterday.
Gov. Jennifer Granholm,
University President Mary
Sue Coleman, Ann Arbor
Mayor John Hieftje and Ann
Arbor SPARK CEO Michael
Finney presented the agenda.
Pfizer liaison David Canter
represented the corporation
at both the meeting and press
conference.

"I'm enormously proud
of what our group has put
together," Coleman said.
Ann Arbor SPARK, a non-
profit organization that helps
establish a healthy business
community in the city, spear-
heads Strategic Working
Action Teams.
It is in charge of providing
updates on Strategic Work-
ing Action Teams projects by
providing regular updates in
town hall meetings and by
posting on their blog at www.
annarborspark.org.
The organization will also
field calls and inquiries about
the Pfizer property and future
of the complex.
All ideas will be directed to
the company, which already
received more than 100 in the
past week.
Strategic Working Action
Teams consists of five objec-
tives embodied by seven com-
mittees. Each committee is
chaired or co-chaired by a
community figure or Univer-
sity employee.
The Talent Team, which is
concerned with keeping Pfiz-
er employees in Ann Arbor, is
co-chaired by Kenneth Nis-
bet, the University's execu-
tive director of technology
transfer.
Granholm, Coleman,
Hieftje and Finney said they
agreed the main focus is to
find ways to keep current
employees in the city.
The group announced that
See PFIZER, page 7

ENCOURAGING ENTREPRENEURS

Public Health graduate student Nastassia Gurganus calls Bursley Hall res dents to rem od them aout the start of the M-FLU study yesterday.
I BY THE NUMBERS
T~H F R S NN

THE PAPER MASK

Fl
st

[u prevention Anatomy extras as surgical
facemasks and hand sanitiz-
udy kicks off er were doled out yesterday
afternoon.
in dorms The students were prepar-
ing for their first day in the
kNIELLE KRUIZENGA School of Public Health's M-
For the Daily FLU study.
The study, supported by
'sley Hall residents grants from the Centers for
d like aspiring Grey's Disease Control and Preven-

The number of students participat-
tion, began when University ing in the M-FL study
Health Services reported
the season's first diagnosis of
influenza. One group of stu-
dent participants is required
to wear masks in the resi-
dence halls until either the
flu season ends or the study
reaches its maximum of six
weeks. Target number of participants
See FLU, page 7

Payment to participarts for wearing
facemasks
Payment to participants who hap-
pen to developflu symptoms

As University and Ann Arbor leaders
scramble to stem the losses from Pfizer's
departure, an effort to germinate new
business ideas is underway on North
Campus.
The College of Engineering hosted an
open forumon entrepreneurship last night
for all engineering students interested in
the business aspects ofttheir fields.
The newly-created Committee on
Entrepreneurial Environment and Pro-
grams for Students got feedback from
students about how to incorporate busi-
ness into the engineering curriculum.
"It's about the marriageof technology
and marketing," Engineering senior Israel
Vicars said.
The committee combines faculty, stu-
dentsandexternalsupporterslikelawyers
and venture capitalists, said Engineering
Prof. Thomas Zurbuchen, who chairs the
committee.
It aims to transformstudent ideas and
innovations into opportunities for busi-
ness growth.
"A lot of engineers have the good
ideas but don't know what to do with

them," Vicars said.
Students proposed several ways to
foster a cultureof entrepreneurship fo
undergsads both on- and off-camnpus.
Zurbuchen said his committee will take
the ideas from the meeting summarize
them and implement measures that the
committee thinks will be useful to stu-
dents.
Many students said they feel that
entrepreeneurship skills needto be devel-
oped early in a student's engineering
schooling, a student business group or
legal service needs to be available, and
a solid bridge must be built between the
engineering and business schools.
Zurbuchen said he wants to "create
that drumbeat of excitement" for entre-
preneurship. But cautioned that "you
can't change culture by decree."
He hopes to start thatculture change
with a spring break trip to the San Fran-
cisco Bay Area for engineering students
and faculty. He said the trip will be an
opportunity to see big business up front
and hear directly from innovators,
- KATHERINE MITCHELL

By DA
Bur
looke

Unlike last year, MAP has
quiet campaign trail ahead

GUN CONTROL

Dominant party The Michigan Action
Party, whose candidates won
announces all the open LSA Student
Government seats and more
candidates than half of the open Michi-
gan Student Assembly seats
By EMILY ANGELL in the fall election, decided
DailyStaffReporter on its slate of presidential
and vice presidential candi-
After last year's four- dates for the March election
party gloves-off rumble for in a nominating convention
control 'of the University's Saturday night.
student government that MSA Student General
included a police investiga- Counsel Zack Yost, a junior
tion, this year's race is shap- in the College of Engineer-
ing up to be much quieter. ing, won the party's nomina-

tion for president.
"I am thrilled about all of
the nominations," he said.
"The other nominees are
great kids and the best can-
didates for the job."
LSA junior Mohammad
Dar, currentexecutive direc-
tor of the Association of Big
Ten Students, an umbrella
group for student govern-
ments at Big Ten univer-
sities, will run for vice
president.
In apress release, Yost and
Dar said they hope to work

with the City Council on the
lease signing ordinance and
to improve lighting in off-
campus areas.
The party also nominated
LSA sophomore Keith Reis-
inger for LSA-SG president
and LSA sophomore Han-
nah Madoff for LSA-SG vice
president.
Reisinger is the current
treasurer of LSA-SG and
Madoff is the LSA-SG aca-
demic relations officer.
Reisinger and Madoff said
See MAP, page 7

Actor Tom Lennon poses at the Michigan Theater yesterday while promoting his new movie
a spin-off from the popular Comedy Central show

TODAY'S H: 22 GOTANEWSTIP? COMINGWEDNESDAY INDEX NEWS-.............-........-2 ARTS- ....5
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WEATHER O news~michgandaily conmand letus know team's struggles against OSU? THE STATEMENT 0CThNCNar4iy........N.N . 4......3 ASPORTS- .8

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