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January 26, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JAMES DICKSON MICHIGAN
NEEDS ENTREPRENEURSHIP
OPINION, PAGE 4

ALMODOVAR'S LATEST A RETURN
TO MELODRAMA
WOMEN'S HOOPS FALLS TO WISCONSIN SPORTS, PAGE.8 ARTS, PAGE S

40ie fidigan DrnIj
1)NE- UNI) N IX EL N AI \IS F IIDITR AL 11El)OM

Ann Arbor, Michigan

w w.michigandailycom

Friday, January 26,2007

Society asks
Angell family
to use its name

JERELMY CHn/a
Brighton resident Casey Janis drinks a beer at Ashley's Restaurant and Pub on State Street yesterday afternoon. The Center for Michigan, an Ann
Arbor-based think tank, has proposed raising the tax on beer.
TAX HIKE BREWING?

Think tank
wants to hike
state's beer levy
By ALESE BAGDOL
Daily StaffReporter
Love cheap beer? Enjoy it
now - it might not be as cheap
next year.
With an $800 million defi-
cit projected for the state of
Michigan this year, the state
might raise the beer tax, said
John Bebow, executive direc-
tor of the Center for Michi-
gan, an Ann Arbor-based
think tank.
In previous fiscal pinch-
es, the state legislature has
increased tobacco, income,
liquor and business taxes. The
beer tax has remained at 20

cents per gallon since 1962.
Had the 1962 tax been
adjusted for inflation over the
last 45 years, it would now be
generating more than $270
million a year instead of the
$44 million it brings in today,
Bebow said. The taxes on a
barrel of beer, the equivalent
of 2 kegs, would be $39 and a
can of beer would cost about
10 cents more.
Raising the beer tax could
have other implications,
though.
According to a 2003 study
by the National Academy of
Sciences, increasing the beer
tax could reduce alcohol con-
sumption and curb irrespon-
sible behavior.
"While this is something
to consider, I don't know if
that motivation is necessar-
See BEER, page 7

SIN TAXES
How much these vices net the state of Michigan's treasury
percent of the cost of liquor
per pack of cigarettes
per gallon of beer

Controversial
group asks to
call itself
Order of Angell
By ANDREW GROSSMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Members of campus's
most elite honor society are
seeking the permission of
the descendants of James
B. Angell to name the group
after the former University
president.
James K. Angell - the
great grandson of James B.
Angell, who helped found
Michigamua in 1902 - said
last night that two members
of the controversial society
came to his Bethesda, Md.
home on Wednesday night
and asked his permission
to call the group order of
Angell.
For more than a century
before it dropped its name
last year, it was called Mich-
igamua - a name picked to
mimic a mythical Native
America tribe that has since
become synonymous with
controversy and racism for
many.
Angell said the two men
askedhimtosignadocument
that said, in part, "I hereby
give my blessing to the Pride
of 2007 (interim name for
the organization formerly
known as Michigamua) to

use Order of Angell as their
organization's name now
and forever."
Angell said he had no
objection to the use of his
great grandfather's* last
name, but he has not signed
the form because he wants
to consult with his sister,
who lives in Michigan.
Society member Andrew
Yahkind, who often serves
as an unofficial spokes-
man for the group, refused
to deny or confirm that the
group would callitself Order
of Angell when reached last
night.
When The Michigan
Daily obtained a list of pos-
sible names for the group
last week, Yahkind said the
society would likely release
the new name in about three
weeks.
When the society
announced a slate of reforms
last spring, which included
releasing the list of mem-
bers of the current class
to the public, it vowed to
announce a new name late
last semester.
The list of possibili-
ties, which the society also
refused to confirm, includ-
ed the name Order of the
Angell.
other names that the
group was reported to be
considering include Blue
Flame, Union of the M, the
Order and the Ms.
Matt McLaughlin, the
captain of the men's golf

team and a member of the
society, condemned the Dai-
ly's coverage of the group
in a written statement last
night.
"We find it unfortunate
that the Daily continues to
focus its attention on idle
speculation regarding the
internal decision-making
process of our organiza-
tion," he wrote. "Although
we're flattered that a story
must be told every step of
the way, we are commit-
ted to releasing our new
name and vision for cam-
pus involvement in the near
future."
James K. Angell, who
graduated fromtheUniversi-
ty in 1945, said he had hardly
heard of the organization
before the men approached
him and asked him to release
the name.
"I didn't realize my great
grandfather had any relation
to this organization," Angell
said. "I'd never read that. I
read the book about him but
I don't remember that being
brought up."
The younger Angell never
met his great grandfather,
who died in 1916 and served
as president of the Univer-
sity from 1871 to 1909.
He is also the namesake
of Angell Hall.
The society already uses
the Angell family name for
some of its secret members,
who are called Honorary
Angells.

Prof who led peace
movement dies at 95

"This has been the place where kids have had their first drink,
their first everything,"
- Jones House President Ali Thompson

Anatol Rapoport
helped plan first
teach-ins
By TARYN HARTMAN
DailyStaffReporter
Anatol Rapoport, one of
the leaders of the peace move-
ment on campus in the 1960s,
died in Toronto on Jan. 20. He
was 95.
Rapoport, a former profes-
sor of mathematical biology in
the Medical School's Mental

Health Research Institute,
helped plan the University's
first teach-in protest against
the Vietnam War.
The protest was one of the
first of its kind nationwide,
said his former colleague
J. David Singer, a professor
emeritus of political science.
Faculty members decided
to hold a teach-in rather than
go on strike in protest. They
wanted to make a statement
without forcing the Univer-
sity to close, Singer said.
Rapoport also helped create
a "Peacemobile" that traveled

the Ann Arbor area distribut-
ing pamphlets, said Anthony
Rapoporthis son.
"Our house was a center for
anti-war activity," Rapoport
said.
Rapoport said his father's
ideas helped unite University
students and faculty around
a common goal and erased
the generational gap between
them. Anatol Rapoport was
discouraged that his efforts at
the University didn't seem to
have an impact on the govern-
ment's policy, Anthony Rapo-
See RAPOPORT, page 7

SNAKE BYTES

A damaged wall inside the Jones House, an I nter-Cooperative Council co-op. After years of a reputation of theft, wild parties and
other assorted vices, the ICC will renovate the house and reopen it as housing for graduate students in September.
Rowdy co-op to be revamped

By MICHAEL COULTER
Daily StaffReporter
The co-op commonly known as
the Joint' House stands half-empty.
Its is scarred with the reminders of
parties past. On a crooked ceiling
fan, a single light bulb burns as the
building waits for remodeling.
The Jones House - two connect-
ed houses occupying 917 and 923 S.
Forest Ave. - will undergo repairs
over the summer to become central
campus's first co-op for graduate

students when it reopens in Septem-
ber.
Travis Jones, president of the
Inter-Cooperative Council, which
manages campus co-ops, said the
building has caused trouble for six or
seven years in the form of wild par-
ties, property damage, theft, vacant
rooms and what Jones called "illegal
transactions."
Engineering' junior Ali Thomp-
son, president of Jones House, said it
is known for its rowdy parties with
eight bands and eight kegs.

"This 'has been the place where
kids have had their first drink, their
first everything," Thompson said.
Many Jones House residents have
been evicted in recent years because
of illegal activity, Thompson said.
The house can hold 46 people, but
currently only 24 people live there.
Until recently, squatters inhabited
some of the empty rooms.
In 2003, the ICC decided to take
action against Jones House.
The council put the house on
See TUITION, page 7

Research engineer Malik Hansen controls the OmniTread OT-4 through a hole at the University's Mobile
Robotics Lab in the Computer Science and Engineering Building yesterday. The robot is a highly maneuver-
able machine capable of negotiating rugged terrain and urban obstacles. Possible applications for this type
of robot technology include surveillance as well as search and rescue.

TODAY'S HI: 30
WEATHER LO24

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INDEX NEWS.,.........
Vol.CXVI, No.84 SUDOK ................
@2007 The Michigan Daily
michiaandailv.com O PIN ION.

. 2 ARTS.....2A .RT................... 5
................3 CLA SSIFIED ...................... 6
.................4 SPORTS ..................8

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