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January 17, 2007 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2007-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CLASSES AND KIDS
PARENTING WHILE STUDYING ATTHE 'U' THE STATEMENT

STIGLICH: I LOVE WAL-MART,
AND YOU SHOULD TOO
OPINION, PAGE4A

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A
SITCOM IS ALL GOOFBALLS?
ARTS, PAGE 5A

iie l ig~tan DaiI j

in Arbor, Michgar

www.michigandaily.com

Wednesday, Jan

THE SKY ISN'T FALLING YET

REFORMING
THE R&E
REQUIREMENT

Student gov't
examines req after
years of campaign
promises
By LAYLA ASLANI
Daily StaffReporter
After completing Political Sci-
ence 324: Black Americans and the
Political System, LSA junior Ryan
Fantuzzi was left wondering why
the course didn't fulfill the LSA race
and ethnicity requirement.
"I took that class and it didn't
count for race and ethnicity," Fan-
tuzzi said. "I think it should have
considering the entire focus of the
THIS CLASS COUNTS:

class was politics and the African-
American community."
Fantuzzi is not alone. Mem-
bers of the LSA Student Govern-
ment and the Michigan Student
Assembly have promised to reform
the requirement for years, but no
changes have been made.
Critics say there is little corre-
lation between a course's topic area
and whether or not it counts for
R&E credit.
WHYSOME CLASSES
DON'T COUNT
In order for a class to count
toward the R&E requirement,
faculty members must submit a
course approval form and a course
syllabus to the LSA Curriculum
See R&E, page 7A
THIS CLASS DOESN'T:

Nursing 220: Perspectives in Women's CAAS 103, Sec. 1: Malcolm X, Black
Health Power and the Practice of History

LSA Course Guide description:"Inthis course we
will examine women's health issues, across the
lifespan, fromtfeministand socio-cultural perspec-
tives. We will explorethe social construction of
women's sexuality, reproductive options, health
care alternatives, and risksfor physicaland mental
illness. Attention will be paid to historical, economic,
and culturalfactors, which influence thephysical,
biological, and psychological well-being ofwomen."

LSA Course Guide description: "This course
examines the life and legacy of Malcolm
X ... Our focus will be on understanding
Malcolm X's influence on the Black Power
movement of the 1960s and 1970s ... In
addition, we will critically assess the ways
in which his legacy continues to be con-
structed and used to represent that period
of Black struggle."

La Voz Latina
sings new song

DEREK BLUMKE/Daily
Rackham student Daniella Marusic (in chicken suit) registers students for the M-Flu project at Stockwell Residence Hall yesterday. M-Flu is conducting research on flu
epidemic prevention techniques. Particapants can earn $40 to $100. Members of the experimental group must wear face masks during most of their time in the dorms
and wash their hands frequently. The project is part of a University-wide effort to prepare for a possible bird flu pandemic.
'U' study: More teenagers raiding
medicine cabinets for drugs

Latino group changes
its name to fight
falling membership
By AMANDA MARKOWITZ
Daily StaffReporter
Leaders of La Voz Latina are
worried about a drop in minority
enrollment after the statewide ban
on affirmative action.
They are banking on a name
change to preserve one of the Uni-
versity's biggest Latino student
groups.
La Voz voted to abandon its Span-
ish-language name and replace it
with Latino Students Organization.
LSA senior Jenn Ortiz, one of the
group's leaders, said members of the
organization were concerned that

the name La Voz Latina excluded
Latino students who do not speak
Spanish or who have not grown up
with "a strong foundation" in the
Latino community.
"We feel that the name change
would make our organization more
accessible and identifiable to the
Latinos that are currently on cam-
pus, the ones that will enroll in the
future and the campus as a whole,"
Ortiz said in an e-mail interview.
This decision comes amid declin-
ing Latino student enrollment and
the elimination of race-based affir-
mative action programsby Proposal
2. Last year, Latino students com-
posed 3 percent of undergraduates,
down from 4.3 percent in 2004,
according to the office of the Reg-
istrar.
Ortiz said she expects this trend
to continue because of Proposal 2.
See LA VOZ, page 7A

Teen marijuana,
meth use down
By ARIKIA MILLIKAN
Daily StaffReporter
More and more teens are get-
ting their fix from the corner phar-
macy instead of the corner drug
dealer, according to a major study
released by the University.
The number of teens who use
prescription narcotics, tranquil-
lizers and sedatives not prescribed

to them has increased since last
year, according to the results of the
2006 Monitoring the Future study
released in December.
But while teens are spending
more time in their parents' medi-
cine cabinets, they are also los-
ing interest in many once-popular
illicit drugs, such as marijuana and
methamphetamine, the study said.
The study also suggests that one
of the most effective indicators of
teen drug use is perceived risk of
using a certain drug. Marijuana
use, for example, has decreased

while the perception that it's a
harmful drug has increased.
Although the Monitoring the
Future study is commissioned by
the White House and fundedbyothe
National Institute on Drug Abuse
the idea for the study was devel-
oped and initiated by research-
ers at the University of Michigan.
This is different from most studies
of the sort, which are initiated by
the government's request.
Lloyd Johnston, a University
researcher and the study's prin-
ciple investigator, was one of the

project's primary designers, begin-
ning duringGerald Ford's presiden-
cy. After 32 years of work, the study
now reaches about 50,000 eighth,
10th and 12th grade students at 410
different schools across the coun-
try.
Johnston said the Monitoring
the Future survey is high in con-
struct validity - meaning it tests
for what it's supposed to measure.
He said it's reliable even though
the participants respond to the
survey on their own, and hon-
See DRUGS STUDY, page 7A

A TOSS UP

Next Navy aircraft carrier to be
christened USS Gerald Ford in 2015

Fa
of
have

WA
lifetim
was me
wear t
be fitt
bers w
bearin
The
aircraf
USS G

rmer president late president, a tribute to his love
of the Navy.
nly 'U' alum to Ford graduated from the Uni-
versity in 1935, where he played
e warship named centeroon the football teamoand was
his hoa member of Delta Kappa Epsilon
i his honor fraternity and Michigamua, the
elite senior society.
SHINGTON (AP) - In a He will be the only University
e of accolades, Gerald Ford alum to have an aircraft carrier
ost honored by the chance to named in his honor.
he Naval uniform. So it may Ford, who served in the Navy
ing that future service mem- during World War Ii, died Dec.
'ill patrol the seas on a vessel 26 at his home in Rancho Mirage,
g his name. Calif., at age 93. The naming deci-
Navy yesterday said its next sion was expected; former Defense
ft carrier will be named the Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said
erald R. Ford in honor of the the Navy was planning the honor

during a eulogy at Ford's funeral.
"President Ford will always be
an example to us of personal kind-
ness, loyalty and coolness under
pressure," said Vice President Dick
Cheney, who served as Ford's chief of
staff, duringa Pentagonceremony.
Susan Ford Bales said her father
had mentioned the impending
honor ina letter to a friend shortly
before his death. He wrote, "In my
life, I have received countless hon-
ors, but none was greater than the
opportunity to wear, the uniform
of lieutenant commander of the
United States Navy."
The former president wrote itwas
a "a source of indescribable pride

and humility to know that an air-
craft carrier bearing my name may
be permanently associated with the
valor and patriotism of the men and
women of the United States Navy."
Betty Ford did not attend the
ceremony but planned to watch it
on a Pentagon broadcast, said Ford
Bales, who was joined by her three
brothers. She said the family was
grateful to the U.S. service branch-
es for accompanying them during
the services honoring their father.
"There is nothing, absolutely
nothing, that would have made
Dad prouder," she said.
Several lawmakers said Ford
See FORD, page 7A

LSA senior Nic Poniatowski tosses pizza crust yesterday at Cottage Inn Pizza at the
corner of Packard and Hill streets.

TODAY'S
WEATHER

HI: 28 GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
LO: 17 news@michgandaily.com and let us know.

COMING THURSDAY
A snapshot of University admissions before Prop
2 took effect. NEWS

INDEX NEWS......
Vol. CXVII, No. 77 OP IN ION.
T2007The Michigan Daily
michigondoily,com ARTS....

.................2A CLASSIFIEDS...............6A
.4A SPORTS. ...............A
.....S A TH ESTATEMENT .................tt

...en>.r

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