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December 11, 2006 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9 C iC4t HIZ ':)at im

Ann Arbor, Michigarn

www.michigandailyxcom

'Apocalypto' has no heart ARTS, PAGE 5A

Monday Decembe r11 006
A MATTER OF TIME
Carr calls playoff 'inevitable'
SPORTSMONDAY

Minority applications increase

Early influx
precedes Prop 2's
implementation
By WALTER NOWINSKI
Daily StaffReporter
Applications to the Univer-
sity from underrepresented

minorities are up nearly 20
percent from the same time a
year ago.
Because Proposal 2 takes
effect in the middle of the
admissions cycle, the pre-
cise date an application is
reviewed is more signifi-
cant this year. Unless a court
delays the implementation of
the amendment, the Univer-
sity will be forced to change

its admissions policy and stop
considering an applicant's
race on Dec. 23. Minority stu-
dents whose applications are
reviewed after that date will
no longer be given race-based
preferences.
Despite the looming chang-
es, Chris Lucier, associate
director of admissions, said
applications are reviewed
strictly based on when the

application is completed. He
said the office hasn't rushed
to consider applications from
underrepresented minorities
before the December dead-
line.
There has also been a dra-
matic increase in the number
of minority students who
have completed their appli-
cations. Nearly two-thirds
of minority applications are

complete, compared to just
over 50 percent at this time
last year. An application is
started when a student sub-
mits any part of the applica-
tion to the University. But the
admissions office does not
review an application until it
has received all of its compo-
nents.
As of Dec. 4, applica-
tions from underrepresented

minorities were up substan-
tially - 1,218 had started
applications, a 19-percent
spike from last year, when
1,022 had, according to from
the office of undergraduate
admissions.
The University consid-
ers black, Latino and Native
American students underrep-
resented minorities.
See ADMISSIONS, page 7A

1F022
Number of applicationsthe
University had receivedfrom
underrepresented minorities as of
Dec. 4 last year.
1,218
Numberthe University has
received as of Dec. 4fthis year.

For now,
Google stays
near campus

BIRTHDAY BASHED

Web search giant
to set up shop on
Liberty Street
By KELLY FRASER
Daily Staff Reporter
Google announced Friday
that it will relocate its Ann
Arbor offices to a larger space
a few blocks from downtown
and closer to campus.
The company plans to
establish an office of AdWords
- the company's advertising
E HuronSt

division - into an 80,000-
square-foot space in the
McKinley Towne Centre at
401 E. Liberty St. this March.
Google has committed to
the space for four years, The
Ann Arbor News reported.
The company announced it
would open an AdWords office
in Ann Arbor. It is expected to
hire 1,000 people locally over
the next five years.
The company has been
operating out of a tempo-
rary 7,000-square-foot office
on South Main Street above
See GOOGLE, page 7A

SWashington 5t

E Librty St
0 w.Viam St .

o~. .Acfr0

01

ANN ARBOR
TF

RODRIGo GAYA/Daily
Hockey alternate captain T.J. Hensick (front) and forward Kevin Porter (rear) skate to the Michigan bench after Notre Dame evened the score in the middle of the third period of
yesterday's matchup in South Bend. Half a minute later, the Irish scored the game-winning goal tocomplete their two-game sweep of Michigan. Hensick was celebrating his 21st birth-
day, which he called "one of the most dissappointing birthdays I've ever had." FOR FULL STORY, SEE SPORTSMONDAY
A lesson in storage from Cambridge

HilSt

N t

RAPHIC BY B I I

BAR STAR

Harvard students'
advice: Beware of
Collegeboxes
By JAKE HOLMES
Daily StaffReporter
About 40 students at Har-
vard are fed up with looking
for their stuff.
When they returned to
their dorm rooms this fall,
the students' belongings
were supposed to be there.
They'd hired Collegeboxes, a

leading campus storage com-
pany, to store their sheets,
rugs and furniture during
summer break. But when
they came back for the first
day of classes, their property
was missing.
Students who called to
complain said they found Col-
legeboxes customer support
less than satisfactory. When
Harvard sophomore Lindsay
Maizel tried to find out where
her furniture was, nobody
would return her calls for
several hours, she said.
In addition to losing

items, the students are alleg-
ing that Collegeboxes lied to
students and delayed reim-
bursing those who had lost
property.
In response to the com-
plaints, Harvard's Under-
graduate Council began
investigating the company's
actions. The student gov-
ernment passed a resolution
urging the college's adminis-
tration to sever ties with Col-
legeboxes.
According to the compa-
ny's website, Collegeboxes
offers its services at the Uni-

versity of Michigan as well.
But so far, it hasn't had much
luck gettingcustomers.
Collegeboxes CEO Scott
Neuberger said it's hard to
gain a market share in Ann
Arbor because local com-
panies, like John's Pack and
Ship, dominate the campus
storage business here.
The University Housing
office prefers to work with
select local companies, Hous-
ing spokesman Alan Levy.
said.
. Since 1997, that company
has been John's Pack and

Ship. Run by University alum
John Kazanjian, it provides
similar services to College-
boxes but has a contract with
the University.
Under the contract, Kaza-
njian's company can send
advertising directly to stu-
dents' parents and can enter
mostHill and Central Campus
dorms before students move
in. When students return to
their dorms in the fall, items
they stored over the summer
are already there.
Levy said it's important to
See STORAGE, page 7A

Daily names
new editors

SHORTCUT

By DAVE MEKELBURG
Daily StaffReporter
As classes come to a close
this semester, a class of edi-
tors at The Michigan Daily
is also nearingthe end of its
tenure.
The Daily's editors hold
their positions for a calen-
dar year. A new group of
editors will assume leader-
ship on Feb. 1.
Karl Stampfl, now the
managing news editor, will
take the position of editor
in chief.
"We're willing to
change," Stampfl said. "We
want to have a reader-cen-

tric Michigan Daily."
Stampfl said he plans to
improve several areas of
the' paper, specifically the
website. The online version
needs to have some Web-
specific content. It should
not just mirror the print
edition, he said.
The previous editors'
tenure brought some sub-
stantial changes to the
paper. The paper launched
a comprehensive redesign
with a narrower page size.
The Daily also added a
weekly arts section, The
B-side.
Managing Editor Jeffrey
See EDITORS, page 7A

A pedestrian ignores the orange netting surrounding the construction site at the University's Mus
yesterday. The museum is slated to reopen in late 2008.

TODAY'S
WEATHER

HI: 44 GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
LO: 34 news@michgandaily.com and letus know.

COMING TUESDAY
After a being closed for almost two years.
Mitch's Bar finally reopens. NEWS

INDEX . NEWS....
Vol. COVi, No.hh.66 W..
02006 The Michigan Daily S UD O K U
michigandaily.com OPINIO N

.2A ARTS.....................
..3A CLASSIFIEDS.........
..4A SPORTSMONDAY..

.5A
.6A

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