100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 06, 2006 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2A - Wednesday, December 6, 2006

NEWS

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

MONDAY:
Ten Spot

TUESDAY:
Arbor Anecdotes

N vEs bxTHURSDAY:
" ".3Explained

FRIDAY:
Before You Were Here

One powerful job
Behind the scenes at the University's power plant

Walking past Palmer Field, you
may have noticed two large smoke-
stacks near an industrial-looking
building. They're part of a power
plant that provides 75 percent of
the University's electrical energy
and all of its thermal energy during
peak seasons.
Richard Wickboldt, the plant
operations manager, supervises
the plant's 32 employees.
"I'm the captain of the ship, so
to speak," he said, laughing.
Charged with overseeing opera-
tions at the plant, Wickboldt has
varying duties vary depending on
the day and the season.
On a typical day, Wickboldt
spends much of his time in meet-
ings planning projects and coor-
dinating staff efforts to make sure
the power plantis running at maxi-
mum efficiency.
Wickboldt said the best part of
his job is to empower the Univer-

sity to fulfill its mission - literally..
He's fond of repeating the plant 's
motto, "Powering the ideas of the
future."
He credits the power plant's
success to the people who physi-
cally maintain the plant's equip-
ment and make it run.
"The people here are very dedi-
cated," he said.
Wickboldt is tall and affable. A
New York native, he came to Ann
Arbor in February of 2002. He
still speaks with a thick New York
accent.
Wickboldthelpsmakeimportant
financial decisions like whether to
buy energy from outside contrac-
tors or produce it on-site during
off-peak hours.
What's the worst part of being
plant manager?
"I enjoy my job, but if I had to
say something, I'd say maintaining
finances," Wickboldt said.

He said the rising cost of fuel
and the state's struggling economy
have made this part of his job more
and more important.
Wickboldt's work to improve
efficiency in the plant hasn't gone
unnoticed.
Under Wickboldt's watch, the
plant won an award from the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency in
2003 for its unusually high level of
efficiency.
One reason for the plant's
effectiveness is that the heat it
produces travels through under-
ground tunnels to many campus
buildings.
The tunnels were dug by hand
in 1914, the year the power plant
was built.
KATIE VANLONKHUYZEN

rl

C 4te ffii~igan Daili
413 E. Huron St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
DONNM.FRESARD ALEXISFLOYD
Editor is Chief Business Manager
734-647-3336 734-764-0558
fresard@michigandaily.com floyd@michigandaily.com
CONTACT INFORMATION
Newsroom office hours:Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.- 2 a.
News Tips news@michigandaily.com
Corrections corrections@nichiganidaily.com
Letterstothe Editor tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Photography Department photo@michigandaily.com,
ArtsSection artspage@michigandaily.com
734-763-0379
Editorial Page opinion@michigandaily.com
Sports Section sports@michigandaily.ro -3
734-764-858s
Display Sales display@nichigandail.com
Classified Sales classified@michigandaily.ceo s
734-764-0557
Online Sales onlineads@michigandaily.com
734-615-013s
Finance finance@michigandaily.com
EDITORIAL STAFF
Jeffrey Bloomer ManagingEditor bloomer@michigandaily.com
Karl Stampfl Managing News Editor stampfl@michigandaily.com
N EWS EDITORS: Leah Graboski, Christina Hildreth, Anne Joling, Anne vanderMey
Emily Beam EditorialPageEditor beam@michigandaily.com
Christopher Zbrozek Editorial Page Editor zbrozek@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Whitney Dibo, Theresa Kennelly, ImranSyed
Jack Herman ManagingSports Editor herman@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Scott Bell, H. Jose Bosch,
MattSinger,KevinWright,Stephanie Wright
SPORTS NIGHT EDITORS: Dan Bromwich. Amber Colvin, Mark
Gianotto, Ian Robinson, Nate Sandals, Dan Levy
Andrew Sargus Klein ManagingArts Editor klein@nichigandaly.com
Bernie Nguyen Managing Arts Editor ,guyen@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITOR: Kimberly Chou
ARTS SUB EDITORS: Lloyd H. Cargo, Caitlin Cowan, Punit Mattoo, Kristin MacDonald
Alex Iziadosz Managing PhotoEditor diadosz@michigandaily.com
Mike Hulsebus Managing Photo Editor hlsebus@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE PHOOEDITOS: Forest Caseyrrevor Cam pbell, Peter Schotterdels
AoSoSANTPOODTOS.Shubra Obri,tgn oertso,,n
Bridget O'Donnell Managing Design Editor odonnell@michigandaily.com
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR: Lisa Gentile
Phil Dokas Managing online Editor dokas@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ONLINE EDITOR: Angela Cesere'
JamesV.Sowd'Magazine Editor dowd@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE MAGAZINE EDITOR:Chris Gaerig
BUSINESS STAFF
Robert Chin DisplaySales Manager
ASSOCIATE DISPLAY SALES MANAGER: Ben Schrotenboer
SPECIAL SECTIONS MANAGER: David Dai
Kristina Diamantoni classified SalesManager
ASSISrANTCLASSiFIED SALESMANAGER:Michael Moore
Emily Cipriano OnlineSalesManager
RyanrVanTasselFinance Manager
Brittany O'Keefe Layout Manager
Chelsea Hoard Production Manager
The MichiganDaily (ISSN0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the
lall and winterterms bystudentsatthe University of MiceahOnecopy is available
mre of char to all readers. Additionral copies may be picked up at the Daily's ollice
for $2. Subscriptionsfor fall term, startingin September,via U.S. mail are $110.
Winter term (January through April)isS115,yearlong (september through April)
is $195. University affiliates aresubject toa reducedsubscription rate. On-campus
subscriptions for fall term are $35. Subscriptions must be prepaid.The Michigan Daily
isa member of The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

a

+

One of the smokestacks of the University of Michigan Power
Plant, which provides electricity and heat to campus buildings.
The power plant was built in1914.

CRIME NOTES
Car stolen,
recovered 25
miles away
WHERE: 3261 Baxter Road
WHEN: Monday at about
4:30 p.m.
WHAT: A 2000 Ford Ranger
was stolen from a street near
North Campus, the Depart-
ment of Public Safety said.
The stolen vehicle was later
recovered after the thief got
into a crash in the city of
Inkster, 25 miles east of Ann
Arbor. The theft is under
investigation.
Hospital valet
dings up truck
WHERE: University Hospital

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

WHEN: Monday at about 7:45
p.m.
WHAT: A valet at the Universi-
ty Hospital scraped the driver's
side door of a Ford pickup truck
while driving around the hos-
pital's main circular driveway,
DPS reported.
Vandal breaks
gate arm at
parking lot exit
WHERE: Thayer Car Park,
216 Thayer St.
WHEN: Monday at about 9
WHAT: The electronic gate
arm at the east exit of the
parking structure was found
broken, DPS reported. A
driver may have maliciously
broken the arm.

Lecture on
Native American
history
WHAT: A lecture about the
influence of Manifest Destiny,
Thomas Jefferson and Lewis
and Clark on Native Americans
WHO: Robert Miller, a pro-
fessor at Lewis and Clark
Law School
WHEN: Today from 6 to 7
p.m.
WHERE: 120 Hutchins Hall
Film on hip-hop
and rap culture
WHAT: A free screening of
"Beyond Beats and Rhymes,"
a documentary exploring sex-
ism, homophobia and mas-
culinity in hip-hop and rap,
followed by a discussion

WHO: Byron Hurt, producer
of the film
WHEN: Today from 7 to 9:30
p.m.
WHERE: 1324 East Hall
Annual Latino
cultural show
WHAT: The 7th annual
Latino culture show, show-
casing music, dance, skits
and other performances
from the Latino community
WHO: The Latino Culture
Show, a student organiza-
tion
WHEN: Today from 7:30 to
9 p.m.
WHERE: Room A, 3rd floor,
Michigan League
CORRECTIONS
Please report any error in
the Daily to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

-Want to know more about a
Universityjob?Emailsuggestions to
news@michigandaily.com.
Last week, Ford Motor
Company announced that
38,000 workers would be
accepting buyout proposals.
The management program at
the University's Ross School of
Business helped Ford design
their severance packages.
"Bobby," Emilio Estevez's
film about Robert Ken-
nedy's assassination, has
earned just $10 million world-
wide since its release. "Happy
Feet," an animated film about
penguins released the same
day, has earned more than $135
million.
FOR MORE, SEE PAGE 5A
On this day in1933, the
21st Amendment was rati-
fied into the U.S. Consti-
tution, effectively ending the
prohibition of alcohol.

Discovery set for night launch

Mayans excited, uneasy
about Gibson's film

CAPE CANAVERAL (AP)- On
Thursday night, Nature and NASA
will collaborate in a painting that
will use the skies over the Eastern
seaboard as a cosmic canvas. The
materials are a nearly full moon,
the stars and a streaking space
shuttle.
There are countless engineer-
ing and safety calculations behind
Thursday's scheduled 9:35 p.m.
blastoff, the first night launch in

four years. But once the shuttle
Discovery's three main engines
light, it's all about the wow fac-
tor.
Take it from former astronaut
Jay Apt.
"In some ways it's sort of like
an eclipse in reverse," Apt said.
"It turns night into day. The
birds wake up - not just because
of the sound. You feel the heat
wave."

The shuttle launches in a
northeasterly directly from Cape
Canaveral, a bit east of the U.S.
coastline, shutting its engines
off and reaching orbit due east
of northern Maine or New-
foundland, according to NASA.
Depending on weather and light-
ing conditions, residents of the
U.S. East Coast should be able
to see some of the shuttle's fiery
streak.

0
40

w*-
per hour of Co0
instrn'ef
Get Your MCAT Scores UP!!
Stewart University Go to... www.stewartmed.org
Headaches Hurt.
But it wouldn't hurt to consider our research study.
You may be eligible to participate in a clinical research
study of an investigational oral drug compared to placebo
for the treatment of a single moderate or severe headache
if you:
" Are male or female, 18 - 65 years old,
and generally healthy
" Have had 1 to 6 moderate or severe headaches
per month for the past 6 months
" Have never been diagnosed with migraine
headaches by a medical doctor
This study, which lasts up to 3 months, requires 2 office
visits and involves the treatment of 1 moderate or severe
headache. Qualified study participants will not be charged
for study-related office visits, medical evaluations, or
study medication.
For more information, please contact:
Michigan Head Pain & Neurological Institute
734-677-6000,option 4

'Apocalypto' may not
reflect Mayan
culture, some fear
MEXICO CITY (AP) - Scenes
of enslaved Maya Indians build-
ing temples for a violent, deca-
dent culture in Mel Gibson's new
film "Apocalypto" may ring true
for many of today's Mayas, who
earn meager wages in construc-
tion camps, building huge tourist
resorts on land they once owned.
Some Mayas are excited at
the prospect of the first feature
film made in their native tongue,
Yucatec Maya. But others among
the 800,000 surviving Mayans are
worried that Gibson's hyper-vio-
lent, apocalyptic film could be just
the latest misreading of their cul-
ture by outsiders.
"There has been a lot of concern
among Mayan groups from Mexico,
Guatemala and Belize, because we
don't know what his treatment or
take on this is going to be," said
Amadeo Cool May of the Indian
defense group "Mayaon," or "We
are Maya."
"This could be an attempt to
merchandize or sell the image of a

culture, or its people, that often dif-
fers from what that people needs, or
wants," Cool Maysaid.
Gibson employed Mayas, most
of whom live on Mexico's Yucatan
peninsula, in the filming of the
movie, and says he wants to make
the Mayan language "cool" again,
and encourage young people "to
speak it with pride."
Just as Gibson's use of Aramaic
in "The Passion of Christ" sparked
a burst of interest in that language,
some Maya are hoping "Apoca-
lypto" will do the same for their
tongue.
"I think it is a good chance to
integrate the Mayan language ... for
people to hear it in movies, on tele-
vision, everywhere," said Hilaria
Maas, a Maya who teaches the lan-
guage at Yucatan's state university.
The film has been screened for
some U.S. Indians, who praised the
use of Indian actors. The Mayas
haven't seen it yet, but like Indi-
ans north of the border, they have
seen others co-opt their culture, as
in high-class Caribbean resorts like
the Maya Coast and the Maya Riv-
iera.
But Indians are largely absent
from those beach resorts, ,where
vacationers tour mock Mayan Vil-

lages or watch culturally inaccurate
mishmashes with "Mayan Dancers"
performing in feather headdresses
and facepaint.
Outsiders' views of the Maya
have long been subject to chang-
ing intellectual fashions. Until the
1950s, academics often depicted the
ancient Mayas as an idyllic, peace-
ful culture devoted to astronomy
and mathematics. Evidence has
since emerged that, even at their
height, the Mayas fought bloody
and sometimes apocalyptic wars
among themselves, lending some-
what more credence to Gibson's
approach.
Today's Maya are knownmainly
for their elaborate rhyming jokes,
a cuisine based on pumpkin and
achiote seeds, and loose embroi-
dered white clothing. They're
largely peaceful farmers and
masons who carry their goods on
ubiquitous three-wheeled bicycles
over table-flat Yucatan.
"Our culture hasn't been
destroyed, because the family is
the base of it," says Maas. "Perhaps
some material things have been
destroyed, but the real basis of the
culture is what a family teaches
their children, and that survives,
and has survived."

0

Program in Science, Tchnology and Society
Distinguished Literature
Science and the
Modern World
Stevin Shapin
Harvard University
Thursday 7 December 2006, 4pm
Vandenberg Room, Michigan League
Co sponsored by the EisenbergInstitute for Historical Studies
For more information:
www.mich.edu/umsts/

0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan