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December 05, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-12-05

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The Michigan Daily - michigandail
COKE
From page 1
Coke products.
The decision to reinstate the
contract came before the prom-
ised investigations were complete,
said Blase Kearney, a member of
Students Organizing for Labor
and Economic Equality.
"Coke never submitted the
results of their investigation to the
University because they never had
a reason to," Kearney said. "They
got their contracts reinstated."
The Coke debate is still raging
across the country. Last month,
Swarthmore College cut its con-
tracts with Coke amid allegations
of human rights abuses.
Rackham student Sayan Bhat-
tacharyya, who hosted the forum
in Mason Hall last week, used the
Coke issue to illustrate the Univer-
sity's complex role as a global citi-
zen at a forum he hosted last week
in Mason Hall. A panel made up
of three students, two professors,

one of the University's lawyers and
Bhattacharyya spoke to an audi-
ence of about 20 people.
"My hope for this forum is to
explore how the University sees
itself as a part of the global com-
munity," Bhattacharyya said. "The
events surrounding the Univer-
sity's relationship with the Coca-
Cola Corporation provide concrete
examples of how the University's
influence is relevant on a global
scale."
Organizational Studies junior
Lindsey Rogers, a member of the
University's chapter of human-
rights advocacy group Amnesty
International,saidaUniversityedu-
cation would be incomplete with-
out teaching ethics.
She said she recognizes that the
priority of the University is the quest
for knowledge. "But knowledge can
be used for good or evil,"Rogers said.
She praised the University for
its code of vendor ethics. But Rog-
ers said the University should have
permanently suspended its con-
tracts with Coke rather than give

the company a timeline to change
its policies.
"By reinstating the contract, the
University legitimized the Coca-
Cola Corporation," Rogers said.
"The University failed in its duty to
act as a responsible global citizen."
University alum Elizabeth
Cowan recalled her conversations
with union workers from Columbia
last year. She explained the stigma
that union workers in South Amer-
ica endure and stressed their reli-
ance on outside support to rectify
their dire situation.
"The workers were terribly disap-
pointed when the University rein-
stated its contracts," she said.
Cowan said that because we live
in an interconnected society, we
have the responsibility to raise the
standard of living for the workers
in Columbia.
Business School Prof. Andrew
Hoffman said he supports the
University's plan. He said the Uni-
versity should not punish Coke by
severing all ties with the company.
Instead, the University can more

effectively change the company's
business practices by working
alongside it.
"TheUniversityhaseveryrightto
envision a better world and choose
to make it so," Hoffman said. "We
need to notonly show what's wrong,
however. We also need to show the
way towards what's right."
LSA junior Ryan Fantuzzi, an
outspoken campus conservative,
argued that the ban on Coke hurt
Michigan workers.
"The only people punished were
the local bottlers," Fantuzzi said.
"The ban hardly helped the people
in Columbia."
Fantuzzi said the University
should first channel its efforts into
helping American citizens. He said
global welfare should come second
to Americans' well-being.
Last winter, Fantuzzi formed a
party to run in Michigan Student
Assembly elections that focused on
getting the University to reinstate
its contract with Coke. His party
lost by a devastating margin, and
the party folded.

COURT
From page 1
far-reaching effects on the University,
even to the point of overturning man-
dates outlined in the 1954 case Brown
v. Board ofEducation.
She said University students' pres-
ence in Washington demonstrates
their dedication to an issue that's rel-
evant to them.
"We must demonstrate that our
University is still involved and com-
mittedtoracialdiversityineducation,"
Tabb said in an e-mail interview.
Many students cited the potential
impact on the University.
"It's important to save diversity,"
said Lauren Davis, also a graduate stu-
dent in the School of Social Work. "We
had a really big problem at Michigan,
and it affectsme as a student here."
LSA sophomore Maggie Horne
said the event has a lot in common
with past struggles for civil rights.
Student members of NAACP, the
Association of Black Social Work
Students, By Any Means Necessary
and a host of other groups attended
the event. The School of Social Work
organized the trip, providing the bus
for anyone in need of transportation.
Social Work students raised money

Tuesday, December 5, 2006 - 7
for the bus through bake sales and
other fundraising. In the end, they
collected barely enough money.
BAMN organizer Luke Massie
said one of the central problems with
the issue of racial integration has
been a lack of exposure.
"It's been so under the radar," he
said. "Buteverywhere we'vegone we
have found overwhelming support
for integration policies."
Maricruz Lopez, co-chair of the
University's BAMN chapter, said
it's hard to make people understand
what is at stake.
"Everyone we've talked to has
shown an interest in this," she said.
"It's a matter of simply explaining.
When we do that, people immediate-
ly respond and want to organize."
Tabb said marching for desegrega-
tion is closely related to the School of
Social Work'sprinciples of advocating
social justice and fighting for equal-
ity. She said her role as a social worker
makes it her duty to work for diversity
and publicize important issues.
"Our student demonstration at
the Supreme Court could have an
immeasurable impact on public sen-
timents and show that the public is
well aware of the cases reviewed,"
she said.

LECTURE
From page 1
during a question-and-answer
period, the crowd remained calm
and quiet throughout the event.
Gabriel is the author of "Because
They Hate: A Survivor of Islamic
Terror Warns America." Gabriel,
who now lives in the United States,
said her negative views on Mus-
lim fundamentalists were shaped
by her childhood experiences as
a Lebanese Christian during the
Lebanese Civil War. The book
describes her experiences living in
a bomb shelter for seven years dur-
ing the war.
Gabriel founded the American
Congress for Truth, a nonprofit
organization that she describes as
"dedicated to educating millions
of uneducated Americans on the
threat of Islamic radicals."
Police were highly visible at last
night's event, which was hosted by
the pro-Israel student group Israel
Initiative for Dialogue, Education

and Action. FLU
LSA junior Brad Stulberg, a From page 1
cofounder of Israel IDEA, said the
group tries to host one big event a Because mass vaccination
year. They said they chose Gabriel wouldn't be a practical defense,
to foster dialogue. hand-washing and facemasks are
"Despite potential threats to Ms. being explored as an alternative
Gabriel's freedom of speech, the form of intervention.
event was very successful," Israel Scientists would first have to
IDEA member Nick Israel said. identify the virus, then develop its
"We were glad to see an audience vaccine, Monto said. That means a
composed of a diverse cross-sec- pharmaceutical defense wouldn't
Lion of the student body and the be available for up to eight months
local community." after a first outbreak.
Organizers collected audience Researchers will monitor the
questions on note cards and posed patient records at University Health
them to Gabriel. Services and look at other studies in
Israel said organizers tried to the state to determine when flu sea-
select questions that challenged her son is in full force.
position. As hard as it is to predict the onset
Gabriel called for Islam to of the annual flu season, scientists
reform itself and said Israelis and face aneven greater challenge intry-
Palestinians hold different ethical ing to forecast a coming pandemic.
standards. Monto said it's impossible to
"(The mainstream television net- determine when the next pandemic
works) need to take political cor- will strike, but history shows that
rectness and shove it in the garbage one can be expected.
where it belongs," she said. "A new influenza virus emerges
NEWS TIPS? NEWS@MICHIGANDAILY.COM

on a regular basis, and when that
happens, itcgoes worldwide," he said.
Montosaidhesuspectsthat avian
flu will be the culprit behind the
next pandemic. The last three pan-
demics of the century, in 1918, 1957
and 1968, were caused by strains of
avian flu that mutated to become
contagious among humans.
That the United States hasn't
had a pandemic in more than 30
years gives scientists the impres-
sion that one might be coming
soon. This has lead to a push for
surveys like the M-FLU study.
To take part in the study, students
in the selected residence halls must
fill out an application on the M-FLU
website. Subjects are expected to
participate in the study for six weeks
or until the end of flu season.
Supervision of the study will
largely rely on the honesty of par-
ticipants. But subjects who admit
to neglecting the practices in
the weekly surveys will still give
insight into the methods' viability,
Monto said.

Student Housing
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2 & 4 Month Spring/Summer $200-425/mo.
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the michigan daily

Campus Fall '07
Address Bdrm. Bath. Price Prkg.
1417 S. University 7+ 3 $4700 Yes
1115 S. Forest 6 2 $3600 Yes
1215 Hill 2 1 $1300 Yes
507 5th Ave. 2 2 $1300 Yes
102 Koch 1 1 $750 No
408 4th Ave. 4 1 $2400 Yes
Call 429-2089
DECEMBER DEALS ARE now on
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Studio, 1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms
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73-761-2680.
DOGS WELCOME SPACIOUS 2
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thing else. Flexible leases. Avail. Dec.
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FALL '07-THE BEST 4 BDRMAPT.!
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water included. Three bdrms. comfort-
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see. $2,995/mo. Email Justin @
rentals@campusmgt.com or call
(734) 663-4101.
FALL '07. 6 bdrm. 1209 Packard. Free
laundry, Prkg. $2700/mo. 323-7198.
FALL LEASING 2007
Beginning November 30, 2006
Great Locations & Amenities
734.995.9200
www.wilsonwhitecompany.com
FALL/SPRING '07.6 Bedroom House
on Hill near Elbel Field. 734.480.2224.
FOR FALL '07. 4 bdrms., 930 Wood-
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dryer, furn. $2045/mo. 734-323-2267.
GREAT CENTRAL CAMPUS
APTS.!
OPEN HOUSES THIS WEEKEND
608 Monroe -Behind S. Quad
Eff., Bi-Lev. 1, 2 Bdrm.
Call Valdis at 248.890.0989 or email
608MonroeManagers@umich.edu
Saturday Open House 1-4 PM
815 S. State - Between Arbor & Hill
Lg. 2 Bdrm. (over 1100 sq. ft. each)
Call Stephanie at 734.904.4744 or
815SouthStateManagers@umich.edu
Sunday Open House 1AM-PM
711 Arch - Between State & Packard
1 Bdrm. Studio, 2 & 3 Bdrms.
Call Phil at 734.662.5270
Sunday Open House 1-4PM
Call above numbers or email for open
house showings or please stop by!
HOUSES AVAIL. FALL '07.
3-9 bdrms., free Idry., prkg., tenants
pay all util. Call 734.996.1991 for
more details or visit
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NEAR UNION CONTEMPORARY
studios to 3 bdrm. apts. available
May & Fall 2007! 741-9300
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LARGE FURNISHED 2 or 3 bdrm.
apt. on S. State, Near UM bus stop, 5
min. to Mich. Union. Avail. Now, win-
ter, Fall '07. Heat & water incl. Balc.,
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smkg./no pets. 734-996-3539 or
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LOCATIONLOCATION LOCATION
2 Bedroom, fully furn. w/ gorgeous
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Call Laura @ 734-994-0644.
NOW TAKING RESERVATIONS
FOR 07/08
Campus Realty
Formally Campus Rentals.
New Name, same Great Location,
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our listings for 2007-2008 school yr.
1335 S. University
734-605-0025
www.campusrealty.com
ON CAMPUS APTS.
May Leases Available.
Studio, 1 & 2 bedrooms.
734-761-2680.
PEPPER'S PROPERTIES 3 bdrm.
apartments on East U. Furnished, hard-
wood firs., prkg. avail., heat and water
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PEPPERS PROPERTIES 7-8 bdrm.
large houses for Sept. '07. Hardwood
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810-231-0229.
SPACIOUS CLEAN ROOM in lower
level well-maintained home. Late Dec.
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furn., all util., prkg., internet & cable
TV., wshr./dryer, A/C. 4 mo. tse.
$525/mo. 417-7787.
TREE CITY PROPERTIES
Houses Available 2007

UNIVERSITY TOWERS
Is in the Holiday spirit.
Check out our December Deals.
Great Apts. & Great Deals
Won't last long.
734-761-2680.

4 BDRM. APT. on Hill/Church. Jan.
'07-Aug. '07. $750/person.
310-776-1404.
APTS., SUBLETS, & Rmmte(s). List
and Browse FREE! All Cities & Areas.
1-877-367-7368 or www.sublet.com
BILLS GOT YOU DOWN?
NEED A LOAN TO GET YOU UP?
CALL US NOW FOR EXPERT AS-
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GRAD STUDENT SPANISH tutor
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MYSTERY SHOPPERS
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NOW HIRING WAIT staff, bar ten-
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conducted for ne
Now Hiring ALL positions!
Interview: Tuesday,
December 51h11-4
Wednesday,
December 6"1 1-6
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P/T SALE POSITION. Outdoor cloth-
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Bay Outfitters 734.222.9776.
PART-TIME LIFE SCIENCES re-
search assistant jobs. Students encour-
aged to apply. Visit our website:
proteomecommons.org/dev/positions.jsp
PhDs or CANDIDATES, any field
Full- & Part-time in small, highly suc-
cessful biotech company near campus.
Email dawn@eyelabgroup.com
or fax 734-665-0569.
PHP DEVELOPER NEEDED for tem-
porary/intermitent work for downtown
web firm. Rate neg. 734-717-2579.
STUDYING ABROAD? Cafe Abroad
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AFTER-SCHOOL CHILD CARE
needed in AA. Hills home for 2 kids: 8
& 10. 15hrs./wk.; 3:30- 6pm., extra
hours available. Must have excellent
driving record and reliable car. Please
call Sally at 734-277-7525.
CHILDCARE NEEDED EARLY AM.
3 times/wk. Responsible/own trans-
portation. 769-1462.
EXPERIENCED, NON-SMOKING
NANNY for 4-year-old boy in our
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and Sun./9-lpm. College/Graduate stu-
dents welcome. 734-678-8861. Please
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P/T NANNY IN A2/Dexter. Tues.,
Wed., Thur., 12-4PM. Must have exp.
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SEEKING AN EXPERIENCED, re-
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terested, please call 622-3596.

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$486/MO. ROOM & BOARD; double
at Michigan Co-op. Call 734-604-6163

6 Bdrm:
Sept.
6 Bdrm:
Sept.
6 Bdrm:
Sept.
5 Bdrm:
Sept.
5 Bdrm:
Sept.
5 Bdrm:
May
4 Bdrm:
Sept.
4 Bdrm:
Sept.
4 Bdrm:
Sept.

1019 Packard
1016 S. Forest
340 S. Division
1115 Packard
925 Sylvan
915 Greenwood
812 Packard
827 Sylvan
1004 Vaughn

$3400
$3700
$3800
$3100
$3000
$2500
$2600
$2300
$2600

For Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2006
ARIES
(March 21to April 19)
You're hungry for adventure! If you're
traveling or in school, this is a wonderful
time for you, because you want to learn
new things and have new experiences.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You're totally focused on how to fairly
share property or possessions that are
jointly owned. (You're never casual
about money, land and the things you
own.) Oh, no!
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
It's all about partnerships right now
for your sign. These partnerships can be
intimate or professional, or they might
even be close friendships.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
You're getting ready to work hard
now. In large measure, this is because
you have a sincere desire to get better
organized in your life. You want every-
thing at the ready.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
What a great party month for you!
Romance, love affairs, professional
sports, playful times with children, the
theater, the arts and fun vacations should
be tops on your menu.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Home, family and real estate continue
to be your major focus right now.
Entertain at home. Invite the gang over.
(It's a good excuse to clean up the
place.)
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
You're very busy now - running
errands, talkingto everyone, taking short
trips and just keeping up to speed. Don't

stay at home. Get out and hustle.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
On the whole, you're a pretty money-
savvy sign. Right now, you're coming up
with all kinds of moneymaking ideas.
Believe in yourself!
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
It's been a long time since so many
planets were in your sign. It's all about
you now, dear Sagittarius. Enjoy the
attention and the opportunities coming
your way.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22to Jan. 19)
You need to work behind the scenes.
You might even need more rest than
usual. Play it low, in the key of C.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb. 18)
This is an extremely popular time for
you! Naturally, this pleases you because
you enjoy schmoozing and networking
(which you do so well!). Working with
groups is enjoyable this month.
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Actually, there are five planets at high
noon in your chart. (This is most
unusual.) Everyone notices you now!
Make the most of this. Go after what you
want, because bosses, parents and VIPs
are unusually impressed with you now.
YOU BORN TODAY You're unusu-
ally confident, bold and daring. Others
love to be in your presence because life
feels more exciting. Because you believe
in a positive outcome, you get things
done. You're active, dynamic, optimistic
and quick to take charge. You believe in
yourself Get ready for a great year (this
could be one of the best years of your
life)!
Birthdate of: Frankie Muniz, actor;
Gary Allan, singer; Little Richard, rock
pioneer.

www.treecityproperties.com
734-994-8733
TOWER PLAZA FURN. 1 bdrm.
Smoke-free, Stadium view, Garage.
$1250. 248-644-6366.
WALDEN MANAGEMENT
917 Main St. 6-Brdm. 3-Baths. Foot-
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1120 White St. 4-Bdrm. 2-Study.
Prkg. Sept. 2007. $2450/mo.
769-2344 or Hutch@provide.net

2006 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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