100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 2006 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THIS WEEK'S INSTALLMENT
OF ARBOR ANECDOTES
NEWS,PAGE 2

BIBLICAL BORE
NATIVITY STORY' IS PROSAIC AS TITLE ARTS, PAGE 5

PUTTING IT IN PERSPECTIVE: TOP
FOUR BCS DISASTERS
SPORTS, PAGE 9

Iie I id ipn4BaiIlj

Ann Arbor, Michigan

www.michigandaily.com

Tuesday December 5,2006

"Despite potential threats to Ms. Gabriel's freedom of speech,
the event was very successful."
- Nick Israel, Israel IDEA member

O MIo IN/Daily
Students board a bus to Washington D.C., where they planned to march
in front of the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday.
'U' students
head to steps
of high court

A campus police officer leaves Angell Hall with a bomb-sniffing dog after sweeping Angell Hall Auditorium C before last night's lecture by Brigitte Gabriel, a critic of
Islamic fundamentalists.
Clouds, bt no thunder

Despite rumors,
protesters don't
interrupt lecture
By KELLY FRASER
Daily StaffReporter
About five campus police offi-
cers and a bomb-sniffing dog swept
Auditorium B of Angell Hall last
night before a speech by a strident
critic of Islamic fundamentalists.
Rumors that the event would
be disrupted by pro-Palestinian
protesters circulated through cam-
pus and on the Internet yesterday,
prompting event organizers to
request a heightened police pres-
ence.
Despite the precautions, pro-
Israel activist Brigitte Gabriel

delivered a lecture in which she
warned Americans about "the dan-
gers of Islamic radicals" without
incident.
Organizers feared pro-Palestin-
ian protesters would disrupt the
speech as they did at the Michi-
gan League during a lecture on
Iran last week. During that lec-
ture, Department of Public Safety
officers arrested three Ann Arbor
residents after they resisted efforts
from police to remove them from a
lecture on Iran.
One protester was taken to the
hospital with minor cuts and a
bloody nose, and his fellow protest-
ers alleged police brutality. DPS is
investigating the incident.
Blaine Coleman, one of the pro-
testers who was arrested on Thurs-
day, did not respond to e-mails
asking for comment last night.

Police used a canine unit to
search the auditorium before
allowing students and commu-
nity members to enter at 7:45 p.m.,
15 minutes before the event was
scheduled to begin.
DPS spokeswoman Diane Brown
said before the event that DPS had
briefed organizers on security pre-
cautions and the University's Free
Speech policy.
None of the protesters who dis-
turbed Thursday's lecture showed
up.
The lecture, which was origi-
nally scheduled in Auditorium C of
Angell Hall, moved to Auditorium
B to accommodate a larger than
expected crowd. The larger audito-
rium filled quickly after the doors
opened.
Before introducing Gabriel,
organizers opened the event by

reading fromthe University's state-
ment on Free Speech and Artistic
Expression.
Rumors on the Internet yester-
day indicated that the event could.
be confrontational.
An e-mail signed with Gabriel's
name was posted on the theco-
versativevoice.com. The e-mail
requests support and protection
from protesters, who it alleges
have sent e-mails to "Arab stu-
dents" askingthem to "give Gabriel
a proper welcome."
Shimaa Abdelfadeel, co-chair of
the pro-Palestinian group Students
Allied for Freedom and Equality
and political chair of the Muslim
Students' Association, said she
had not heard of or seen such an
e-mail.
Except for frequent applause
See LECTURE, page 7

K-12 integration
cases draw busload
of protesters
By BRIAN TENGEL
DailyStaffReporter
University students are once
again delving into the debate
about race in public education.
This time, though, it's not affir-
mative action that's mobilizing
them. It's voluntary integration
of K-12 schools.
Just fewer than 40 students
and other activists loaded a
bus on South University Ave-
nue on Sunday night bound
for Washington. There, they
joined others from across the
country to protest in front of
the Supreme Court yesterday.
It was the first of three days
on which the high court will
hear arguments on two law-
suits challenging the legal-
ity of voluntary integration
programs for public schools
in Louisville and Seattle.
The programs allow school
districts to consider race in
assigning students to district

schools as a way to ensure
that each school's racial
makeup reflects that of the
entire system. It's an attempt
to offset the segregation that
often results from neighbor-
hood housing patterns.
The lawsuits are primarily
concerned with K-12 educa-
tion, but depending on how
the decision is worded and
how it's argued, it could affect
the University.
If the court decides to ban
desegregation programs, it
could open up the possibil-
ity that the court would over-
turn Grutter v. Bollinger, the
landmark 2003 decision that
upheld the Law School's use of
affirmative action in its admis-
sions policy.
A ban on the desegrega-
tion programs could affect the
University's potential legal
efforts to maintain its affirma-
tive action programs, which
were banned by last month's
passage of Proposal 2.
Karen Tabb, a graduate stu-
dent in the School of Social
Work, said a ban on desegre-
gation programs could have
See COURT, page 7

Activists
. revisit
war on
Coke
Students, staff
revisit debate with
forum
By ALESE BAGDOL
Daily StaffReporter
Ever since the University
reinstated its purchasing con-
tract with Coca-Cola in April,
the once-contentious debate
over the soda giant's labor
practices has been remark-
ably quiet.
At a student-organized
forum last week, the issue
bubbled up once more.
It doesn't appear likely,
though, that Coke products
will disappear from campus
again anytime soon.

Who's that in
the white mask?

Dorm dwellers
asked to take part
in flu study
By JESSICA VOSGERCHIAN
Daily StaffReporter
It's not the strange smells
that pervade University resi-
dence halls that will soon
have students wearing masks
around campus this winter.
Students will don the masks
for cash.
The masks are part of a two-
year study on the effectiveness
of non-pharmaceutical tactics
incurbingthe spread ofinfluen-
za. The study, called M-FLU, is
being conducted by the Univer-
sity's School of Public Health.
Researchers will track the
health of about 2,250 students
during the height of flu sea-
son. Residents of Couzens,
Alice Lloyd and Mary Markley
residence halls - all notorious
germ-breeding. Petri dishes

- will be asked to wear face-
masks for much of the day
for several weeks. Students
in Bursley Hall will follow
a hand-washing regimen in
addition to wearing masks.
Researchers will study control
groups in East Quadrangle and
Stockwell residence halls.
The students won't be mak-
ing a fashion statement, but
they'll earn about $30 to $100.
Researchershopetheresults
will help officials understand
how to fight a pandemic like
bird flu, which experts say
is likely to strike the United
States in the future.
Epidemiology Prof Arnold
Monto, the lead M-FLU
researcher, said the practices
need to be proven scientifical-
ly before they're relied on in a
pandemic.
"You see pictures of people
in Asia with facemasks on, but
Asia doesn't have the data sup-
porting the method's effec-
tiveness," Monto said.
See FLU, page 7

Business School Prof. Andrew Hoffman (left) and Rackham student Sayan Bhattacharyya (right) speak at a forum about the Universitys con-
tracts with Coca-Cola, which were cut for four months earlier this year.

Facing pressure from cam-
pus activists last year, the
University cut its contracts
with Coke. The University
was one of 19 school that
stopped buying Coke prod-
ucts in response to alleged
human rights violations.

Four months later, the
University resumed business
with Coke upon the recom-
mendations of the Dispute
Review Board, the advisory
board responsible for hear-
ing complaints against the
Vendor Code of Conduct.

The code of conduct outlines
labor and environmental
standards that vendors who
do business with the Uni-
versity must abide by. The
University reinstated its con-
tracts after Coca-Cola agreed
to two ongoing independent

investigations looking into
alleged incidents in Colombia
and India.
Campus activists took the
opportunity of the forum
to question the University's
decision to resume buying
See COKE, page 7

TODAY'S
WEATHER

HI: 30 GOT A NEWS TIP?
L:-25 Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michgandaily.com and let us know.

COMING WEDNESDAY
How the 'U' would deal w h tornados, fires.
floods and bombs THE STATEMENT

INDEX NW...
VolCXVII, No.62 NEWS.
02006 The Michigan Daily S U D O K U..
michigandaoy.com DyNI ONN.

.2 ARTS............
.3 CLASSI FIEDS
.4 SPORTS.......

..5
..6
..9

t .4

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan