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December 01, 2006 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-12-01

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The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

LEASES
From page 1
this year.
Stephanie Chang, an attorney for
Student Legal Services, said many
students she has met with aren't
sure about their housing rights.
"We want to make sure that stu-
dents know what they can and can-
not do with respect to housing," she
said.
Not many students seem to be

aware of the ordinance's details.
Many said they thought today was
the first day for lease signing.
"The landlords did mention that
they couldn't show places until Dec.
1st," LSA sophomore Liz Parker
said. She said she didn't know many
other details.
Ke and Lee said they thought this
confusion might have prevented a
rush.
"What surprised me is that it was
supposed to be the most-sought-
after house, but no one came for it

until 8," Lee said. "Maybe people
were confused about the Dec. 1
date."
The Off-Campus Housing Office
has been holding informational
sessions to inform students about
the ordinance, but many are still in
the dark.
"I feel like a freshman again,
trying to figure out housing," LSA
junior Jenny Lohner said. "I just
feel like I should know more infor-
mation by now."
The Michigan Student Assem-

bly's External Relations Committee
has been working with the office to
hold the sessions. Mohammad Dar,
chair of the committee, said it will
expand its efforts to educate stu-
dents next semester.
Some students said the confusion
of figuring out the new ordinance is
one more worry they don't need.
"Around this time of year espe-
cially, housing is the last thing on my
mind," said LSA sophomore Alayna
Corden. "Ithinkthis adds alotofanx-
iety to students at this time of year."

AIDS WEEK
From page 1
step away from that, said LSA senior
Sunil Joy, the week's coordinator.
World AIDS Week is a relatively
new addition to the world of cam-
pus activism. Similar events were
first held on campus in 1991 after
Los Angeles Lakers basketball leg-
end Magic Johnson announced that
he was HIV-positive - a moment
that catapulted the disease into the
public consciousness on an unprec-
edented scale.
But campus momentum dissipat-
ed until University Health Services
employee Traci Jarrett decided
to resuscitate it last year. She con-
vinced six student groups to coor-
dinate awareness efforts during the
week before Dec. 1, which is World
AIDS Day.

This year, the number of groups
has swelled to nearly 20.
When Jarrett left UHS to go to
graduate school, Joy stepped in to
take her place.
Over the course of the week, Joy
oversaw the coordination of ral-
lies, film screenings, fundraisers
and lectures with titles like "Out
of Control: AIDS in Black America"
and "Barebacking in the Gay Male
Community."
One of the most enlightening
moments occurred at Tuesday's
"Abstinence vs. Safe Sex" panel dis-
cussion in the Wolverine Room of
the Union, Joy said.
Equipped with a hodgepodge of
contraceptives from the Safe Sex
Store on South University Ave.,
Leon Golson, director of preven-
tion programs at the HIV/AIDS
Resource Center, pantomimed an
array of preventive techniques.

Atone point, he showed the audi-
ence how to prevent condoms from
breaking by clearing the air bubble
from the tip.
"He was going crazy showing
everyone," Joy said. "But it was all
very helpful - I learned something
new."
On Wednesday night, the African
Students Association held a char-
ity bar night at Club Oz on Fifth
Avenue that raised more than $800
for a nonprofit group that works to
fight AIDS in Zambia and Mozam-
bique.
The event brought together a
diverse set of co-sponsors, including
the Arab Student Association and
the Caribbean People Association.
The week's activities united
groups that don't often work
together.
For the only time all year, Circle
K, Planned Parenthood and the

Office of LGBT Affairs contributed
to a single cause.
"It's just amazing that we could
all come together," Joy shouted
over Oz's pulsing dance mix. "The
only thing that connects us is this
epidemic."
The week's central event will
take place tonight at 7 in the Pend-
leton Room of the Michigan Union
with an exhibit of photographs
and writings by HIV-positive area
residents. The event is sponsored
by the HIV/AIDS Resource Cen-
ter, a nonprofit group that has
worked with HIV-positive people
in Washtenaw Country since 1986.
Tomorrow night, the Multicul-
tural Greek Council and National
Pan-Hellenic Council will co-
sponsor a fundraiser at Good Time
Charley's to support an AIDS ser-
vice organization in the Carib-
bean.

GOOGLE
From page 1
through Mirlyn - the University's
library catalog - or through Google
Book Search at books.google.com.
Through Mirlyn, they can search
the volumes of books that have been
uploaded so far from University
libraries. In one recent week, about
30,000 books were uploaded.
MBooks provides the full text
of books, but only for those in the
public domain or lacking a copy-
right, like government documents.
In order toscan copyrighted works,
MBooks must ask permission from
the copyright holder. Without their
consent, readers can only see short
snippets.
Bunnell said Google's founders,
Sergey Brin and University alum
Larry Page, envisioned a world of
digitized books while pursuing
their doctorates at Stanford.
"Books were in the minds of the
founders from the very beginning,"
said Bunnell, also a University
alum.
Since Google started copying
books, the company has encoun-
tered its share of legal battles.
Last fall, five members of the
American Association of Publishers
filed a lawsuit accusing Google of
copyright infringement. They com-

Friday, December 1, 2006 - 9
plained that Google was earning
revenue from copyrighted mate-
rial without authors' consent. The
Authors Guild has also filed suit,
citing similar concerns.
Willett said MBooks will pro-
vide students with an opportunity
to discover new books.
"It will take them to books they
wouldn't have known about before,
and it will do so faster," he said.
Using the MBooks program,
students will be able to search by
keyword rather than by title, which
will make it easier to find relevant
information.
The University's libraries will
also be improved, Willett said.
"It will increase the use of our
collection," he said. "Having things
available online increases the use of
physical copies."
In the future, Willett said he
would like to see MBooks provide
people with a way to assemble their
own personal collections.
He also floated the idea of a
"wiki-like environment" that
would allow users to edit the con-
tent of the program and correct any
errors they find.
Willett said he is optimistic that
Google will reach its goal of digitiz-
ing every book in the world.
"With the level of production
we're seeing now, that's definitely
possible," he said.

Wintry storm slams Midwest

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) - The
first major snowstorm of the season
blew across the Plains and Midwest
yesterday, grounding flights, closing
schools, glazing highways and threat-
ening to dump up to a foot of snow
on communities that had basked in
balmy weather only days earlier.
The wintry weather spread
across an area stretching from
Texas and Oklahoma to Michigan,

and a blizzard warning was posted
in parts of Oklahoma.
ClayEnder,whoworks for aheat-
ing service company, struggled to
get around in the 3 inches of snow
that fell overnight in Lubbock,
Texas. A trip across the city that
usually takes 20 minutes stretched
to an hour, he said.
"There were so many cars spin-
ning out of control," he said. The

system roared through the North-
west and Rockies earlier in the
week. Coming on the heels of near-
record high temperatures, it rolled
through Kansas on Wednesday,
coating tree limbs and power lines
with half an inch of ice. By yester-
day, the storm was moving from
Oklahoma on the way to Illinois.
Sleet, snow and freezing rain
forced the cancellation of 200

flights out of Dallas-Fort Worth
International Airport and closed
some schools. In the Texas Pan-
handle, roads were covered with
ice and up to 7 inches of snow.
Northern Oklahoma expected to
receive 8 to 12inches ofsnow, while
parts of Illinois prepared for 6 to 12
inches. Varying amounts were also
forecast for Missouri, Kansas and
Arkansas.

the michigan daily

COCKROACHES
From page 1
"The concept of getting clean
with something that is symbolically
so dirty is terrible," she said.
And they're big. Makki held
her thumb and forefinger about 3
inches apart to illustrate the bugs'
length.
Both Hanson and Makki said
they complained to their resident
adviser, who passed their con-
cerns on to the hall's front desk.
Their resident adviser told them
that the hall would not be fumi-
gated unless cockroaches were
found elsewhere in the building,
which is home to almost 1,200
students.
"I guess there's nothing you can
do in a building this old," Makki
said.
LSA freshman Christine Mus-
cat hasn't run into cockroaches in
the shower, but she did find one in
the corner of the bathroom.
Sona Kotecha and Emma Sten-
saas, both LSA freshmen, said
they haven't had encounters with
the cockroaches, but that there is
another pest menacing them while
they wash.
"There are flies all over our
shower," said Kotecha. "They're
like gnats - kind of."
LSA junior Tim Musial, a Mar-
kley front desk attendant, said
student complaints are passed on
to FIXIT, a division of University
Housing that maintains the resi-
dence halls.
Residents of the fifth floor of
Elliot House, also in Markley, said
they saw a bat in the stairwell on

Tuesday night.
"There was a bat right outside
our hall and it flew in the stair-
well," said LSA freshman Lauren
Perlin. "Some girls shut the door an
it wouldn't fly into nur hall."
LSA freshman Lizzie Fuhr said
she didn't see the bat, but she did
hear people screaming and rushing
out of the building.
The hall's RA, education junior
Leslie Kehoe, said someone called
the University's plant operations
division, which maintains Univer-
sity buildings. But the bat man-
aged escape on its own before help
arrived.
"They opened the door and the
bat flew out," Musial said.
University Housing Spokesman
Alan Levy said bats occasionally
fly into buildings. He was unable to
confirm any specific complaints of
cockroaches.
He said students facing pest
problems should contact Univer-
sity Housing, which has immediate
access to exterminators.
But bugs are also just a part of
life, whether students live on- or
off-campus, Levy said.
"We will respond very quickly if
we hear reports," he said.
Levy said Housing is always try-
ing to keep bugs out of residence
halls.
"We're doing preventative work
all the time," he said.
Despite the minor trauma some
students suffer when they find big
black insects in the shower, Mark-
ley residents said they were taking
the problem in stride.
"It's part of our college experi-
ence," Makki said, adding that she
plans to tell her children about the
year she lived with cockroaches.

TREE CITY PROPERTIES
Houses Available 2007

6 Bdrm:
Sept.
6 Bdrm:
Sept.
6 Bdrm:
Sept.
5 Bdrm:
Sept.
5 Bdrm:
Sept.
5 Bdrm:
Sept.
5 Bdrm:
May
4 Bdrm:
Sept.
4 Bdrm:
Sept.
4 Bdrm:
Sept.

1019 Packard
1016 S. Forest
340 S. Division
1115 Packard
925 Sylvan
407 Hamilton
915 Greenwood
812 Packard
827 Sylvan
1004 Vaughn

$3400
$3700
$3800
$3100
$3000
$3000
$2500
$2600
$2300
$2600

www.treecityproperties.com
734-994-8733
TOWER PLAZA FURN. 1 bdrm.
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WALDEN MANAGEMENT
917 Main St. 6-Brdm. 3-Baths. Foot-
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1120 White St. 4-Bdrm. 2-Study.
Prkg. Sept. 2007. $2450/mo.
769-2344 or Hutch@provide.net
2-STORY 2 BDRM apt. Winter sublet.
4 blocks from central campus, near IM
building. Lives 3. 517-403-5633. $999.
APTS., SUBLETS, & Rmmte(s). List
and Browse FREE! All Cities & Areas.
1-877-367-7368 or www.sublet.com

$10.00/HR. MICHIGAN TELEFUND
now hiring. Great Resume Builder! Ap-
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EARN $4,000' Be an Egg Donor.
Must be 20-27 years of age and a non-
smoker. Please call Alternative Repro-
ductive Resources at 248-723-9979 or
www.arrl.com for info.
EARN $$00-$3200 PER month to
drive brand new cars with ads placed
on them. www.DriveAdCars.com
EGG DONORS NEEDED ASAP
$5000 Minimum compensation.
Attractive, fit, non-smoking females
age 21-29. Info. is confidential. Call
941-741-4994 or register online at
openarmsconsultants.com
GRAD STUDENT SPANISH tutor
needed for 1-5 12 yr. olds, 2-3 after-
noons/wk. Rate neg. 734.717.2579.
MYSTERY SHOPPERS
Earn up to $150 per day. Exp. not Re-
quired. Undercover Shoppers Needed
to Judge Retail and Dining Establish-
ments. Call 800-7224791.
NOW HIRING WAIT staff, bar ten-
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son. Playhouse 13201 Middlebelt Rd.
Romulus, MI. 734-941-3144.
P/T LEASING CONSULTANT
needed for Whitmore Lake apartment
community. Must be able to work Sat-
urdays. Seeking responsible, outgoing,
friendly individuals. Please fax resume
to: 614-441-4587.
P/T SALE POSITION. Outdoor cloth-
ing for men and women, $8/hr. Colton
Bay Outfitters 734.222.9776.
PERSONAL AID NEEDED for
Quadriplegic. Call for details between
1pm and 6pm. 944-7405.
PhDs or CANDIDATES, any field
Full- & Part-time in small, highly suc-
cessful biotech company near campus.
Email dawn@eyelabgroup.com
or fax 734-665-0569.
PHP DEVELOPER NEEDED for tem-
porary/intermitent work for downtown
web firm. Rate neg. 734-717-2579.
STUDYING ABROAD? Cafe Abroad
is seeking talented writers and moti-
vated managers. cafeabroad.com
WOLVERINESNEEDJOBS.COM
We need Paid survey takers in Ann
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CHILDCARE IN ANN ARBOR.
Caring, qualified person to care for a
2-year-old boy 2-3 days/wk. 10am-6pm.
West side of A2. (734) 332-3362.
SEEKING AN EXPERIENCED, re-
sponsible nanny to take care of our two
children (6 & 4 yrs.) in our home. If in-
terested, please call 622-3596.
AKC FEMALE YORKIE, AKC regis-
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Color with excellent black points eyes.
He comes with health guarantee, up to-
date shots and worming, very lovable
socialized. Vet checked and health cer-
tificate. He will make you a wonderful
pet and companion. Sbs, grown and
for more info. you can contact me via
email karenintcoltd@yahoo.com

VISIT LONDON ENGLAND 2007
Spring Break! $599/person. Bed and
breakfast, free drinks night, sightseeing
tour & river cruise! 1800-599-8635.
sales@springbreaklondon.com
www.springbreaklondon.com

JOIN THE NEWS STAFF:
E-MAIL NEWS@MICHIGANDAILY.COM.

$486/MO. ROOM & BOARD; double
at Michigan Co-op. Call 734-604-6163.
FEM. RMMTE WNTD. for Fall '07 &
Winter '08. Central campus $500+ util.
4 bdrm. apt. Call 310-766-5464 for info.

For Friday, Dec. 1, 2006
ARIES
(March 21to April 19)
This is a loosey-goosey day. Because
the Moon is in your sign for most of the
day, you might feel a bit more emotional
than usual. Take everything with a grain
of salt.
TAURUS
(April 20to May 20)
This is not a good day for business and
commerce. Whatever you initiate might
never come to fruition. Whatever you
buy might never get used.
GEMINI
(May 21to June 20)
Keep things light-hearted with friends
and groups. Avoid important decisions.
In particular, avoid making commit-
ments or promises to others.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
This is a poor day to give a deadline to
your boss or any other authority figure.
Just tell people you need to sleepaon it or
that you want to give manters a sober,
second thought.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Try to do something different today!
You want to learn something new, and
you're secretly hoping to have an adven-
ture - somehow. Good luck!
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
This is not a good day to decide how
to share something important or valuable
with somebody else. Whatever you
decide will likely have to be changed or
amended later.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Keep things light in conversations
with loved ones today. Make no prom-
ises. And don't agree to plans. This is the
kind of day were everything is up for
grabs.

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Take care of mundane, routine details
at work. Don't initiate new projects now.
Just coast along and see what happens.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22to Dec. 21)
This is the perfect day to goof off. You
don't really feel like working. Ironically,
you probably won't get much done any-
way. (There are exceptions.)
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
You might feel like staying at home
today. However, this is not a good day to
shop. But it is a good day to putter
around at home. Invite family members
over. Enjoy fun times with loved ones.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb. 18)
This is a mildly accident-prone day.
Be careful when driving or walking.
Similarly, be careful- about what sud-
denly pops out of your mouth!
(Forewarned is forearmed.)
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Although your attention might turn to
money matters today, wait until tomor-
row or another day for major expendi-
tures. It's all a bit of a crapshoot today.
Whatever you buy likely will not please
you later.
YOU BORN TODAY You're intelli-
gent and humorous. You have a strong
social conscience and often make com-
ments about society. You're outspoken,
but you walk your talk. You have a
breezy exterior, but you're serious and
profound. Socially, you're charming and
flirtatious. You enjoy the company of
others and vice versa. The year ahead is
extremely social and fun-loving. Enjoy!
Birthdate of: Bette Midler,
singer/actress; Woody Allen,
author/filmmaker; Joe Quesada,
editor/writer

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Student Housing
Inter-Cooperative O n l
Student Owned Democratically Run Since 1937
4 & 8 Month Fall/Winter Contracts $475/mo.
2 & 4 Month Spring/Summer $200-425/mo.

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enience 3
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EXPERIENCED, NON-SMOKING
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0 2006 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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