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December 01, 2006 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-12-01

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SPIKERS SET
BLUE READY FOR NCAA TOURNEY SPORTS, PAGE 10

DRAFT IS ILLEGITIMATE SOLUTION
TO LEGITIMATE PROBLEM
OPINION, PAGE 4

ONE E ,Dcigan S wiEE- NEAils OF IFrEdyI IALe F'E EDrIOM
Ann Arbor, Mich gan www.michigandaily.com Friday, December 1 2006

COURTS
Charges
against
'Arrington
dropped
Prosecution could reauthorize
charges at a later date
By NATE SANDALS and KEVIN WRIGHT
Daily Sports Writers
YPSILANTI - It doesn't appear that Adrian
Arrington will be facing domestic violence charges.
The state's case against the Michigan wide
receiver was dismissed yesterday in Washtenaw
County District Court 14A-2.
The domestic violence charges stemmed from
an Oct 13 altercation between Arrington and his
girlfriend. Although the girlfriend, an Eastern
Michigan University student, did not press charges,
prosecutors can pursue domestic incidents regard-
less of the victim's will.
Arrington and his lawyer arrived more than an
hour late for his final settlement hearing. His attor-
ney, Christopher Easthope, apologized for the tardy
entrance, explaining that he had been in another
court for a separate case.
The court date was to be the final scheduled
hearing before jury selection if both parties were
prepared to continue.
After assistant prosecutor Robyn Brazeal said
the prosecution was not ready to proceed, Easthope
motioned for a dismissal, and Judge Kirk W. Tabbey
quickly granted the request.
Deputy chief assistant prosecutor Steve Hiller
said the reason for the dismissal is the judge's rule
that the victim in a domestic dispute must appear
at the final settlement hearing. Despite repeat-
ed efforts by the Ypsilanti Police Department,
Arrington's girlfriend couldn't be located to attend
the hearing, Hiller said.
The case was dismissed without prejudice, mean-
ingthatcthe prosecution can reauthorize the charges
at a later date. Hiller said that it is unlikely this will
occur, but the option will still be left open.
Unlike Arrington's previous two court appear-
ances, his girlfriend was not present. Had she been
present, the prosecution could have called her as a
witness for testimony in the trial next week.
According to Hiller, it's common for victims in
domestic violence cases not to appear on their court
dates.Fortheprosecution,Hillersaidthemainconcern
is thehealth and safety ofthe victimin such cases.
Throughout the ordeal, Michigan coach Lloyd
Carr didn't suspend Arrington, saying that the facts
didn't support with the charges. Carr did sit the
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, native for the first five plays of
the Oct.28 Northwestern game.
It is unlikelythatArrington will face further dis-
ciplinary action from the team.

"I think that there was some hype that came from a lack of
students understanding the leasing ordinance."
- Colin Khan, manager of CMB Property Management

Students camp out in a SUV behind the Campus Management office on East Huron Street late Wednesday night. They were waiting to be first in line to sign a lease for a
coveted house on Walnut Street in the morning. By the time the sun rose, they were still the only group waiting and got the house.
Confusion marks first days of lease signing for off-Campus housing under new system

By KIRSTY MCNAMARA
Daily StaffReporter
Amanda Darish, Jessica Ke and
Amanda Lee weren't taking any
chances on their housing for next
year.
On Wednesday night, the eve
of the first day they could sign a
lease for a coveted house on Walnut
Street, the three Business School
sophomores camped out near the
office of Campus Management on
Huron Street in hopes of cementing
their housing plans.
The students said they expected
fierce competition for the house
because a representative from Cam-
pus Management had told them it

was the most sought-after house
for this fall.
In past years, they might have
signed a lease as soon as they knew
they wanted to live together. In
some cases, this happened as early
as September or October.
But in March, the Ann Arbor
City Council passed an ordinance
prohibiting the signing of leases
until 90 days of the current lease
period had expired. Proponents of
the ordinance hoped it would help
alleviate the pressure many incom-
ing students felt to find housing
during their first weeks at the Uni-
versity. Because of the ordinance,
yesterday was the first day new ten-
ants could sign agreements for leas-

es that began on Sept. 1. Most leases
run from September to September.
Darish, Ke and Lee didn't wait in
vain.
"It was definitely worth it," Dar-
ish said. "I mean, we're happy right
now because we were able to sign
our lease."
The roommates-to-be waited in
the car for eleven hours.
The morning rush, however,
never materialized. When Campus
Management opened yesterday, the
girls were only one of three groups
standing outside the company's
East Huron Street office.
"It was actually really anticli-
mactic," Ke said. "We could have
shown up at 8 o'clock this morning

and signed our lease."
She wasn't the only one who
noticed the absence of stamped-
ing would-be renters. Colin Khan,
manager of CMB Property Man-
agement, said this year's rush
hasn't been much different from
past years.
"I was surprised to hear that stu-
dents were camping out, because
there wasn't a mad rush," Khan
said. "I think that there was some
hype that came from a lack of stu-
dents understanding the leasing
ordinance."
University officials and city lead-
ers have noted on the high levels
of confusion regarding housing for
See LEASES, page 9

GOOG LE
How
to use
scanned
books
Google Book Search
not finished uploading
By BRIAN TENGEL
Daily StaffReporter
Although all of the books in the
University's libraries haven't yet
been digitized by Google, students
can search those that have.
Yesterday afternoon, Ben Bun-
nell, the library partnership man-
ager of Google Book Search, and
Perry Willett, head of the Univer-
sity's digital library production
service, spoke in West Hall about
how students can take advantage of
the progress of the project to make
books searchable online.
They showed a crowd of about 50
how to use the features of the book
search available so far.
To accessothe site, students cango
See GOOGLE, page 9

WHERE DID YOU LAST SEE IT?

LSA juniors Nancy Spencer and Kamille Brown of the African Students Association dance at Cafe Oz o
Wednesday for an event that was part of World AIDS Week on campus.
AIDS week fights stigma

A scenefrom Mnemonic, a Basement Arts production that explores human memory. The play will
be performed tonight at 7 and 11 and tomorrow at 7. FOR FULL STORY, SEE PAGES.
ockroaches, bats
infest residence hal

Campus groups
V organized six
days of events
By ALEX DZIADOSZ
Daily StaffReporter
Initially christened Gay-
Related Immune Deficiency,
AIDS has garnered a fair

share of stigma for its victims
since it was first reported in
1981 at a Los Angeles clinic.
As research has advanced
and increasingly nuanced
awareness efforts have
changed minds, the myths
surrounding the disease have
eroded.
Today marks the culmi-
nation of World AIDS Week
on campus, a six-day run of

student activists' efforts to
continue that trend.
While AIDS victims are
no longer barred from drink-
ing fountains, and presidents
no longer call it the "gay can-
cer," as Ronald Reagan once
did, many delusions about
the disease's origins and
treatments still exist.
The past week was a good
See AIDS WEEK, page 9

By EMILY BARTON
Daily StaffReporter
It's been a rough year
for dorm dwellers. Bursley
had false fire alarms, East
Quad had bugs in the salad,
and now Markley has cock-
roaches in the showers and

bats in the stairwells.
Residents of Mary Mar-
kley Residence Hall's fifth-
floor Blagdon House said
they regularly see cock-
roaches in the bathroom.
"There was one in the
shower this morning," LSA
freshman Lisa Hanson

said.
Her roommate, LSA
freshman Nadia Makki,
has also had a confronta-
tion with a cockroach.
She said she found one in
the shower about a month
ago and ran back to her
See COCKROACHES, page 9

TODAY'S HI 37
WEATHER LO:24

GOT A NE WS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michgandaily.com and letus know,

ON THE WIRE NEWS BLOG
Three protesters arrested for heckling pro-Israeli
speaker. MICHIGANDAILY.COM/THE WIRE

INDEX
VolCXVII,No. 60 NEWS ......
02006 The Michigan Daily S U D O K U..
michigondaily.com OPINION.

.2 ARTS ..............
.3 CLASSIFIEDS..
.. 4 SPORTS...........

..............5
..............6
.............10

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