100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 29, 2006 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2A -Wednesday, November 29, 2006

MONDAY:
Ten Spot

THURSDAY: FRIDAY:
Explained Before You Were Here

For whom tolling the bell is ajob
The most widely heard musician on campus

Since he was a child, Steven Ball
has been fascinatedby bells.
As the University's carillonneur, he
now rings them for a living.
Atop the Burton Memorial Tower,
Ball plays the carillon, a series of bells
rung by playing a keyboard like that
of an organ.
The bells are programmed to ring
every quarter-hour - a throwback to
the Renaissance, when city-dwellers
depended on church bells to tell time.
Ball jingled a huge key ring that
looked like a jailer's as he climbed the
narrow stairwell from his office on the
ninth floor of the tower yesterday. As
Ball walked around the Charles Baird
Carillon's 60 bells, he explained how
the instrument works.
"It's unimaginably simple," Ball
said.
The carillonneur hits keys and ped-
als on a keyboard. The keys and pedals
pull wires, which activate the ham-
mers that strike the bells.
The 43-ton carillon, with bells rang-
ing from 21 pounds to 12 tons, is the

third largest of the 500 in the world.
Ball often receives letters asking
him to perform pieces.
One "Star Wars" fan asked Ball to
arrange John Williams's score from
the classic filmseries. Ball said he's too
busy to oblige.
He has learned a little of the music,
though.
Sitting at the carillon bench, Ball
formed his hands into loose fists and
pounded out "The Imperial March
(Darth Vader's Theme)." For a few
seconds, a sinister echo lingered over
Central Campus.
"Just to prove that it can be done,"
Ball said.
Ball said playing the carillon is spe-
cial for those who get the opportunity
because most of campus can hear it.
"Every time they're up here, it's a
performance," Ball said. "It's actuallya
little unnerving, because you can have
a hundred thousand people listening
to you."
During high school, Ball took a
carillon course at Grand Valley State

PETER SCOTTE5FELS/Daily
Several of the sixty bells that make up the Universi-
ty's Charles Baird Carillon. The carillon was added
to the newly-built Burton Memorial Tower in 1936.

CRIME NOTES
Brothers fight WHEN: Monday at about 9
a.m.
in parking lot WHAT: A racial slur against
blacks was written in marker
SWH ERE: 3621 State St. on the door of a Univer-
WHEN: Monday at about sity employee's office, DPS
1 p.m. reported. It may have been
frATm F obrothentr targeted at the employee,
from Florida got into a fight who is black, police said.
while driving down State
Street, the Department
of Public Safety reported. Arb emegency
After fighting in a park- p-a
ing lot, one man drove off,
leaving his brother behind. WHERE: Nichols Arbore-
The remaining man was tum, 1827 Geddes Ave.
unharmed and wouldn't WHEN: Monday at about 6
say why he and his brother p.m.
were fighting. WHAT: The blue light on

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

University. He continued studying the
instrument at the University of Michi-
gan, and in 1998 became a member of
the Guild of Carillonneurs of North
America.
Now Ball teaches students to play
the massive instrument.
Anyone with keyboard proficiency
can apply to learn carillon. In an aver-
age semester, Ball teaches the instru-
ment to 15 to 20 students, he said.
This semester's class is smaller
because Ball is finishing a doctorate in
campanology - the study of bells - at
the University.
Ball said he feels lucky to be able to
make a living playing the carillon.
"It's somewhat difficult to play the
carillon professionally, because there
are not as many full-time positions in
the world," Ball said. "But this is one
of the really cool spots."
GABE NELSON
- Want to know more about a Uni-
versity job? E-mail suggestions to news@
michigandoily.com.
er ,.U AUV11UMT
te
According to a study
s, conducted by Scottish
,r researchers, sitting
upright puts unnecessary
stress on the spine. Leaning
backward at 135 degrees is
to the healthiest way to sit, the
researchers found.
:rium,
Although the Univer-
sity holds classes until
the day before Thanks-
s giving, many schools give
students the whole week off.
FOR MORE, SEE PAGE 4A
Because Michigan has
ste no law against mistreat-
ing a dead body, two
6 nurse's aides for a Sterling
Heights nursing home have
avoided successfulprosecution
0. after posingfor pictures with
a dead body, the Detroit Free
tal Press reported.

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com
413 E. Huron St.
Ann ArborMI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
DONNM.LFRESARD ALEXIS FLOYD
Editor is Chief Business Hanager
734-647-3336 734-764-0558
freCard@miehigasdaitycem floyd@michigasdailycom
CONTACT INFORMATION
Newsroom office hours Sun.-Thrs.t1 a.m.- 2 a.m.
734-763-2459
News Tips mews@michigandaily.com
Corrections corrections@michigandaily.com
letters to tbe Editor tohedaily@emichigaedaily.com
Photography Department pheo@michigandaily.com
734-764-0563
Arts Section artspage@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page opinion@michigandaiy.com
734-763-0379
Sports Section sports@michigandaily.com
Display Sales display@micheandaily.co
734-764-0ss4
tlassified Sales classiied@michigandaily.com
734-764-0557
Online Sales onlineads@michigandaily.com
Finance finance@michigandaily.com
EDITORIAL STAFF
Jeffrey Bloomer Managing Editor bloomer@michigandaily.com
Karl Stampfl Managing NewsEditor stampfl@michigandaily.com
NEWS EDITORS: Leah Graboski, Christina Hildreth, Anne Joling, Anne VanderMey
Emily Beam EditorialPageEditor beam@michigandaily.com
ChristopherZbrozekEditorialPageEditor zbroek@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Whitney Dibo, Theresa Kennelly, I mran Syed
Jack Herman Managing Sports Editor hernean@reichigandaily.com
SEIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Scott BellH Jose Bosch,
sp)rTS NIGHT 'EDITrORS: Dan Bromwich,Amber Colvin, Mark
Giannotto, Ian Robinson, Nate Sandals, Dan Leevy
AndrewSargus Klein Managing Arts Editor klein@michigandaily.com
Bernie Nguyen ManagingArts Editor nguyen@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITOR: Kimberly Chou
ARTS SUB EDITORS: Lloyd H. Cargo, Caitlin Cowan, Punit Mattoo, Kristin MacDonald
Alex DziadosZ Managing Photo Editor dziadosz@michigandaily.com
Mike Hulsebus Managing PhotoEditor hulsebus@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITORS: Forest Casey, Trevor Campbell, Peter Schottenfels
ASSISTANTPHOTO EDITORS:ShubraOri, Eugene Robertson
BridgetO'Donnell Managing Design Editor odonnell@michigandaily.com
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDI'TOR: Lisa Gentile
Phil Dokas Managing Online Editor dokas@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ONLINE EDITOR: Angela Cesere
James V. Dowd Magazine Editor dowd@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATEMAGAZINEEDITOR:ChrisGaerig
BUSINESS STAFF
RobertChin Display sales Manager
ASSOCIATE DISPLAY SALES MANAGER: Ben Schrotenboer
SPECIAL SECTIONS MANAGER: DaviDai
Kristina Diamantoni Classified Sales Manager
ASSISTANT CLASSIFIED SALES MANAGER: Michael Moore
Emily Cipriano OnlineSales Manager
ana"asseFinanceManager
Brittany O'Keefe Layout Manager
Che'sea Board ProdoctionsuMnger
TheMichigan Daily (ISSN0745-967)is published Mondaythrough Friday duringthe
fall andwinter termsby students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available
free of charge to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily'soffice
for $2. Subscriptionsfor fall term, startingin September via U.S.mail are $110.
Winterterm(JanuarythroughApril)is115Syearlong(SeptemberthroughApril
is$195.University affiliatesare subject toareduced subscription rate.On-campus
subscriptionsforfall termare$35 .Subscriptionsmust benprepaid. The MichiganDaily
isa memberof The Associated Press and The Associated Collegiate Press.

0
9
,

0

Bookmaking
workshop
WHAT: A workshop hosted
by Arts on the Hill to teach
students about the art of
bookmaking.
WHO: Artist Nancy Laut-
enbach
WHEN: Today from 6 to
9 p.m.
WHERE: Alice Lloyd Resi-
dence Hall Art Studio

sponsored by the Taub
Manufacturing Institu
and students from the
Ross School of Busines
the College of Enginee
ing and the College of
Art and Architecture
WHEN: Today from 61
8 p.m.
WHERE: Tishman At
Computer Science and
Engineering Building
Reenactment

I

of influential
Cooking with concerts
one hand,

Racist epithet
written on door
WHERE: Medical Science
Unit II, 1137 Catherine St.

top of an emergency phone
was stolen, DPS reported. It
was removed so cleanly DPS
thought it was being repaired,
but University maintenance
staff confirmed that it had
been stolen.

WHAT: A display of a "one-
handed kitchen" including
cooking utensils that only
require one hand to use -
WHO: Integrated Product
Development, a course

WHAT: Students imit:
influential musicians
WHO: Musicology 50t
students
WHEN: Today at 8 p.r
WHERE: E.V. Moore
Building, Britton Recit
Hall

Granholm to propose lower business taxes

LANSING (AP) - Michigan businesses
would see their overalltaxrate drop towhat the
Granholm administration says is the nation's
lowest under a new tax plan the administra-
tion plans to release yesterday, The Associated
Press has learned.
Businesses would be taxed at one rate
- 0.125 percent - on their gross receipts and
assets, while profits would be taxed at a rate of
1.875 percent, according to two of the people
who were briefed on the plan by administra-
tion officials. Both spoke yesterday on condi-
tion of anonymity because the plan had not yet
been released.
Unlike the current Single Business Tax, the
new tax wouldn't include payroll or benefits
such as health insurance in calculating what's
due.
It's designed to bring in the same amount of

tax revenue that businesses now pay, but it low-
ers the tax rate and broadens the base. Busi-
nesses with $350,000 or less in gross receipts
wouldn't have to file, the same as under the
SBT.
Gov. Jennifer Granholm plans to hold a news
conference at 9:30 a.m. today to discuss the
plan, a half hour after state Treasurer Robert
Kleine briefs reporters on the details.
The treasurer's office was contacted yester-
day by the AP but declined to release details.
Businesses now pay about $1.9 million annu-
ally through the SBT and about $1.75 billion
through the personal property tax. They also
pay property taxes on their land and buildings,
sales and use taxes on items they buy and unem-
ployment insurance taxes on their workers.
Insurance companies, which now pay a1 per-
cent tax on premiums, would see that increase

to 1.25 percent under the plan. Granholm last
year had proposed doubling it to 2 percent,
but insurance companies fiercely fought that
increase.
Under the plan, commercial and industrial
businesses no longer would have to pay 18 mills
in local school tax and 6 mills in state educa-
tion tax on personal property such as the com-
puters and equipment they own, cutting those
taxes by more than 40 percent.
The state would have to make up a larger
share of payments to schools, possibly by using
some of the additional revenue from the tax on
gross receipts, assets and profits to beef up the
School Aid Fund.
The SBT is set to expire at the end of next year,
and Granholm last week urged lawmakers to put
a replacement tax in place before wrappingup the
two-year legislative session in mid-December.

Witnesses detail
burning attack
in111Baghdad
BAGHDAD (AP) -The attack on Imad al-Hashimi, a Sunni el
the small Mustafa Sunni mosque in Hurriyah, who told Al-Arab
began as worshippers were finish- television he saw people who w
ing Friday midday prayers. About soaked in kerosene, then set af
50 unarmed men, many in black burning before his eyes.
uniforms and some wearing ski AP Television News also ts
masks, walked through the dis- video of the Mustafa mosque she
trict chanting "We are the Mahdi ing a large portion of the fronts
Army, shield of the Shiites." around the door blown away.I
Fifteen minutes later, two interior of the mosque appeare
white pickup trucks, a black BMW be badly damaged and there w
and a black Opel drove up to the signs of fire.
marchers. The suspected Shiite However, the U.S. military s
militiamen took automatic rifles in a letter to the AP late Mont
and rocket-propelled grenade three days after the incident, t
launchers from the vehicles. They it had checked with the Iraqi Ir
then blasted open the front of the rior Ministry and was told t
mosque, dragged six worshippers no one by the name of Jamil H

0

der
biya
vere
ire,
ook
Dw-
wall
The
J to
vere
aid
day,
hat
nte-
hat
Sus- ,

I i

JOIN DAILY NEWS. CLIMB TOWERS.
NEWS@MICHIGANDAILY.COM

Cl a
4-,
4-,
4-,
1
Ch
Ch-k

f i

outside, doused them with kero-

Earn your M.Ed. and initial teacher
licensure through The George
Washington University while serving as
an apprentice teacher at Norwood
School, a nationally recognized K-8
independent school in Bethesda,
Maryland.
MATI is a 13 month, full-time, on-site
graduate immersion program designed
to prepare new teachers for service in

I1sene and set them on fire.
This account of one of the most
horrific alleged attacks of Iraq's
a P R sectarian war emerged Tuesday in
Hflf RE separate interviews with residents
of a Sunni enclave in the largely
- NOY.30@Q8 PM Shiite Hurriyah district of Bagh-
DEC. 1@8 PM dad.
D CThe Associated Press first
DEC. 2 @2 PM reported on Friday's incident that
DEC 2@8 PM evening, based on the account of
2 police Capt. Jamil Hussein and
DEC. 3@2 PM

sein works for the ministry or as a U
Baghdad police officer.
Lt. Michael B. Dean, a public 1
affairs officer of the U.S. Navy
Multi-National Corps-Iraq Joint
Operations Center, signed the let-
ter, a text of which was published
subsequently on several Internet
blogs. The letter also reiterated
an earlier statement from the U.S.
military that it had been unable
to confirm the report of immola-
tion.

public and independent schools.
Enjoy reduced tuition rates at GW! DA Student Housing
MENDELSSOHNAfe4
Classes begin June 2007 THEATRE
Priority deadline for applicationsandMICHICAN UNION Student Owned Democratically Run Since 1937
financial assistance is January 15. - TICKET OFFICE
734-763-TKTS
TICETMASTEILCOI4 4 & 8 Month Fall/Winter Contracts $475/mo.
2 & 4 Month Spring/Summer $200-425/mo.
NORWOOD II ARJ,Pg
Call 734-662-4414
iL [(iCtWsH iNGTON UNsvtERsITt
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATIONnlai
AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT MASSiMesING Il""e fo'youcane-
SUNDAY, JAN. 7 at 7:30 PM \
out MATI @ www.norwoodschool.org IIUSSEYROOM,MI(I.L[A6UL WWW.ICC.COOp

I

L '
;!, '

? \' \Y\° _ .I tin .lk - F"'- - si\\,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan