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November 27, 2006 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-27

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* The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com

PROP 2
From page lA
Administrators are encouraging
members of the campus communi-
ty to e-mail suggestions and ques-
tions about Proposal 2 to two new
addresses: diversity.blueprints@
umich.edu and diversity.ques-
tions@umich.edu.
University spokeswoman Julie
Peterson said the University cre-
ated the two addresses to make
it easy for the community to give
creative suggestions on how to
deal with the ban and to ask ques-
tions about its impact.
If the desperate efforts to sal-
vage diversity at the University of
California at Berkeley foreshad-
ow the coming struggle here, the
working group will need to con-
jure some very creative strategy to
maintain a diverse campus.
California voters approved
Proposition 209 banning affir-
mative action in 1996. Berkeley's
administration rushed to respond,
trying a slew of different policies

with the common goal of prevent-
ing plummeting minority enroll-
ment numbers.
These included economic affir-
mative action - giving preference
to applicants based on socioeco-
nomic status - as well as guaran-
teeing admission to top students
from each in-state high school. All
these ideas failed.
Black enrollment dropped more
than 60 percent the year after the
ban passed.
"There was a real effort to do
everything to give an opportunity
to those who had been historically
excluded without taking race and
gender into account," Robert Ber-
dahl, former chancellor of UC-
Berkeley said in an interview in
October.
"But the fact of the matter is,
it is very hard to find any form of
disadvantage that compensates
for taking race into account if one
wants to have a diverse student
body," he said.
The diversity working group is
just one part of the University's
response to the constitutional

amendment. It has no direct con-
nection to the University's legal
response or any of the tacti-
cal groups that are figuring out
exactly how the amendment will
impact the University, Sullivan
said.
ONLY VISIBLE ACTION
Despite all the talk, the working
group is the only publicly visible
action the University has taken
since Coleman's speech on the
Diag on Nov. 8.
The day after Proposal 2 passed,
a defiant Coleman questioned
the legality of the constitutional
amendment and vowed that the
University would fight it in court.
Coleman also pledged that the
University's first step in respond-
ing to the amendment would be to
seek court approval to finish this
year's admissions process under
the current system.
But two weeks after Coleman's dra-
matic address onthe Diagthe Univer-
sityhas yettotake anylegal action.
"The University has not made
any announcements about next

steps legally," Peterson said.
The constitutional amend-
ment is set to take effect on Dec.
23, and will immediately prohibit
the University from considering
race, gender and national origin in
admissions.
Sullivan said her office is
assuming the amendment will
take effect Dec. 23 and that an
enrollment advising group is try-
ing to identify the intricacies of
how the amendment will affect
this year's undergraduate admis-
sions process.
For example, if admissions offi-
cials receive an application by Dec.
23 but receive recommendation
letters three days later, can they
consider race?
She also said the admissions
office would likely be fairly conser-
vative in any changes to the policy
this year and would simply elimi-
nate consideration of race and gen-
der if the amendment takes effect
in the middle of the cycle.
Any other grand changes to the
admissions policy would need fac-
ulty consultation, Sullivan said.

Monday, November 27, 2006 - 7A
Officer injured in
Bush motorcade dies

HONOLULU (AP) - A motorcy-
cle officer injured last week while
escorting President Bush in the
islands died yesterday, police said.
Steve Favela, 30, and two other
officers crashed their cycles as the
presidential motorcade was travel-
ing across Hickam Air Force Base
to meet troops for breakfast early
yesterday. The other officers were
treated at The Queen's Medical
Center and released.
Favela, an eight-year veteran of
the Honolulu Police Department
and father of four, had suffered
internal injuries and had been in
critical condition at the medical
center.
Bush said in a statement that he
and the first lady were "deeply sad-
dened" by the death, and sent their
condolences.
"Officer Favela risked his life

B-SCHOOL
From page IA
approaches at Ross, he said, most
classes compel students to connect
with their environment and peers
directly.
"Sometimes we're taking our
students and exporting them to the
real world," he said. "And some-
times we're taking the real world
and creating it here."
He pointed to the school's Mul-
tidisciplinary Action Programs.
Every year, MBA students tackle
about 85 seven-week projects. Each
focuses on a real-world issue.
"It could be figuring out what
the Landmine Survivors Network
ought to do in Bosnia," he said.
"How 3M can open up channels of
distribution in China. Whatever."
Instructors hand-select the
teams, ensuring diversity of
"national origin, race, gender and
so forth," Dolan said.
To succeed, team members must
hurdle any cultural boundaries that
arise.
Much of the program's value
comes from the variance among
student backgrounds and view-
points, Dolan said. Team-based

environments force students to
actively engage a diverse set of peo-
ple - something they might not do
outside of class.
"It seems to be working for us,"
he said, citing Ross's perennial
position at the crest of rankings
published by U.S. News and World
Report, Newsweek and The Wall
Street Journal.
Most of these rankings lean
heavily on recruiter preferences,
Dolan said. Because companies
usually cater to diverse sets of cus-
tomers, they value applicants sen-
sitive to ethnic, racial and cultural
differences.
Ross's hands-on approach to
diversity gives graduates an edge,
he said: "There is no one that has
done it on the level we do."
Although Proposal 2 won't take
effect until next month, some cur-
rent students say the school isn't
diverse enough as is.
Sumanth Rao, a student in the
Business School's evening MBA
program, said he has been disap-
pointed with his classes' lack of
minorities and women.
Rao works full-time for Arvin-
Meritor, an automotive supplier that
encourages its employees to learn
about diversity firsthand. As a result,

he said, he tries to work with students
as different from himself as possible.
But he often comes up short. The
international student body has "too
many Indians and Chinese," said
Rao, who is Indian.
Business School junior Ruben
Soto, a Latino, said that he knows
"pretty much all the other third-
year Latinos" - which he estimat-
ed numbered only three or four in
a class of 366.
Hector Orejuela, a Business
School junior from Puerto Rico,
said he thought there was a slight-
ly higher percentage of Latinos
- about 5 percent - but said that
the proportion was still too small.
He said blacks seem particularly
underrepresented.
The Business School's most
recent class profile lists Soto and
Orejuela's class as 29 percent non-
white but does not differentiate by
individual race or ethnicity. Cur-
rent MBA classes are listed as being
between 23 and 26 percent minori-
ties.
Despite these concerns, Dolan's
approach seems to be working. In
September, the Business School
beat out historically black How-
ard University to take the first spot
in the Wall Street Journal's "Top

Schools for Recruiting Minorities"
category.
THE CHILLING EFFECT
Whether Proposal 2 will change
this is still a matter of speculation.
Recruiters have been fairly silent
on the issue, and new rankings are
months away.
For now, Dolan is optimistic.
The Business School's minority
recruitment relies mostly on outreach
programs, he said.
One such program is UpClose, an
invitation-only weekend-long whirl of
meetings, lectures and tours focused
on wooing minority students.
Dolan often uses business termi-
nology to illustrate his points, and he
called these programs pipeline build-
ers - efforts to "generate demand for
our product."
Because these programs don't
make exclusions on gender or race, he
said, they should withstand the burst
of legal scrutiny that Proposal 2 is
expected to spark.
"If someone says, 'Gee, I'd like to
come visit the school,' we say, 'Abso-
lutely!' " he said. "It's not like we're
hiding any information from people."
Still, his expression reflected at
least a slight concern.
He mentioned the chance of a

"chilling effect" - the possibility
that minority applicants might now
perceive the University as hostile or
unwelcoming.
MBA student Alexis Olans said
she shares Dolan's worry. She said
the University's historical devotion to
diversity played a role in her decision
to attend. More important, she said,
a lack of commitment would have
repelled her.
Orejuela said he worried specifi-
cally about the fate of the BBA Mas-
tery Program, which provides tutors
to students from disadvantaged back-
grounds.
The program was vital for Orejuela,
who said his Puerto Rican math class-
es didn't meet most U.S. standards.
Proposal 2 could mean an end
to this program as well as to the
race-based allotment of scholarship
money.
Dolan often suggests that the Busi-
ness School is itselfabusiness-albeit
a far more complex and enigmatic one
than most. For him, education with-
out diversity would be like building
Cadillacs without carburetors.
And so Dolan has found himself
asking a key question: "Over the next
few years, can we continue to do the
things that have made our students
very valuable to organizations?"

every day to protect the people of
his community," Bush said in the
statement. "In this time of great
sadness, we give thanks for his life
of service."
Police Capt. Frank Fujii said
police officers across the state
would place black bands across
their badges in honor of Favela.
"When I received the phone call
that Steve had passed away, quite
frankly my heart just sank to the
guts of my stomach," Fujiisaid.
Light rain hadbeen falling on the
partly cloudy morning of the crash,
and some roads on the base were
slick.
Members of the White House
medical team - including an
ambulance - were cut loose from
the motorcade to help. Local
ambulance and fire units also
responded.
ZIPCARS
From page IA
need to get somewhere and don't
have the means to do it without
paying a ton on cab fare."
The company started in 2000
with a few cars at the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology and
Harvard University.
Including the University of
Michigan, Zipcar has launched six
new programs this fall.
If the service is found successful,
the University will consider allow-
ing more vehicles to be introduced
into the program.
"We saw car-sharing as yet one
more tool inavarietyofoptions that
we could provide to faculty, staff
and students," said Diane Brown, a
University spokeswoman.
The University has guaranteed
a certain amount of revenue for
the company as well as designated
parking spots for the cars.
The Cambridge-based company
says it provides an alternative todeal-
ingwith the fees,lines and insurance
costs at car rental services.
"It's wheels when you want
them," Zipcar spokesman Adam
Brophy said.

the michigan daily

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For Monday, Nov. 27, 2006
ARIES
(March 21to April 19)
This is a good time to explore travel
and educational opportunities. In some
way, you can expand your experience of
the world now.
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
You're never casual about money and
possessions. In fact, many of you are in
banking. This is a good time to think
about how to properly share something
that is jointly held.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
Committedapartnerships and close
relationships are important to you now.
You need freedom, yet you also want
this person in your life.
CANCER
(June 21to July 22)
Do whatever you can to improve your
job. This might mean getting a different
job. It also could mean that your current
job will simply improve through circum-
stances.
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
This is a good month for a vacation.
It's also a good time for you to get in
touch with your creative talents. (It's the
doing that counts.)
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
Discussions with parents and family
members are significant now. Follow
through on your desires to renovate or
redecorate where you live.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
Life is going at a busy pace right now!
In large measure, this is because you
have a strong need to communicate to
others. You have something you want to
say!

SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 I Nov. 21)
You need to define what is important
to you. How else will you know what to
go after? (After all, you'll likely earn
more money in the year ahead.)
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22to Dec. 21)
Everything in life is timing. Right
now, it's excellent timing for your sign!
Make the most of opportunities that are
coming your way. Expect a miracle!
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22to Jan. 19)
Continue to work behind the scenes.
Get as much rest as you can. Contact
with the government and large institu-
tions can be successful foryou now. Just
take things one day at a time.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb. 18)
You might discover how important
your friends are to you. (It's easy to take
them for granted.) If you want to have
more friends, be friendly!
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
This is a good time to give serious
thought to your life path. Areyou headed
in the direction you want to go? Are your
goals your own or someone else's?
YOU BORN TODAY You generate
excitement around you; in large part, this
is because you're intuitive and
extremely impulsive. You do everything
quickly and with enormous gusto! You
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spontaneous. You love children and fam-
ily. Despite your own need for indepen-
dence, you will always create a secure
home. The year ahead will focus on your
partnerships and closest friendships.
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