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November 27, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-27

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2A - Monday, November 27, 2006

THURSDAY:
Explained

FRIDAY:
Before You Were Here

TOP TEN BEST (WORST)
FATTY FOODS
1. Eggs Benedict with Hollandaise sauce
- Grams of fat in average serving: 72
Calories in average serving: 1,000
2. Cheeseburger - Fat: 68 grams, Calo-
ries:1,000
3. Duck Confit - Fat:60 grams, Calories:
1,000
4. Fondue - Fat: 50 grams, Calories:
1,300
5. Fettuccine Alfredo - Fat: 40 grams,
Calories: 500
6. French Fries - Fat: 30 to 50 grams,
Calories: 600 to 1,000
7. Foie Gras (Liver) - Fat: 35 grams,
Calories: 300 to 400
8. Chicken Hash - Fat:30 to 35 grams,
Calories: 400
9. Fried Chicken - Fat: 20 to 30 grams,
Calories: 200 to 400
10. Lasagna - Fat: 30 grams, Calories:
500

Eggs, burgers are caloric heavyweights
Thanksgiving dishes missing from list of guilty pleasures

It's a good thing turkey isn't on
this list.
Forbes magazine ranked the top
ten best (worst) foods on the basis of
their high fat and calorie content.
The Daily presented the list of
favorites to students to see what was
missing.
Just awakening from turkey-
induced Tryptophan naps, most
students still had high-calorie
holiday foods on their minds.
Many were surprised to learn that
more Thanksgivings foods didn't
make the list.
"Gravy can't be good," LSA junior
Jasper Jinx said.
According to the Good
Housekeeping Thanksgiving calorie
counter, a serving of white and dark
turkey with gravy contains about
525 calories and 25 grams of fat.

Lasagna, which rounded out the
Forbes' list, has about 500 calories
and 30 grams of fat per serving.
Some students also said they
were surprised that their favorite
desserts, including pie, didn't make
the cut.
"Cream puffs, that's got to be
straight calories," Jinx said.
A slice of pecan pie with a dollop
of whipped cream comes in at
504 calories and 27 grams of fat,
according to the calorie counter.
Pumpkin pie, on the other hand, is a
healthier choice, with an average of
282 calories and 16 grams of fat per
serving.
Adding ice cream, however, will
add about 160 calories and 11 grams
of fat per serving.
Sweet and mashed potatoes are
also low-fat options for the holidays.

Sweet potatoes are fat-free, and
mashed potatoes without butter
average about 4 grams of fat per
serving, and 5 fewer grams of fat
than bread stuffing.
A serving of ham is about 239
calories and 10 grams of fat.
Other than traditional holiday
foods, LSA senior Sid Gupta said
he was surprised to learn that fried
chicken contained fewer grams of
fat than French fries.
On average, French fries pack
about 200 to 600 more calories
and about 20 grams of fat more per
serving than fried chicken.
Several students were surprised
to see eggs Benedict with
hollandaise sauce on top of the
list, citing the relatively nutritious
reputation of eggs.
KELLYFRASER

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The Michigan Daily (ISSN0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during he
fall andwinter termsby studentsat theUniversityof Michigan.Onecopyisavailable
freeof chargetoallreaders.Additional copiesmay be pickedupat the Daily'soffice
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01

CRIME NOTES
Burglars take Skaters invade

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

iPods while
students away
WHERE: Couzens Resi-
dence Hall, 1300 Ann St.
WHEN: Saturday at about
11 p.m.
WHAT: Burglars broke
into several rooms with
unlocked windows, the
Department of Public Safety
reported. Two iPods were
taken. Police said the inci-
dent is under investigation.
Stolen wallet
later retrieved
without cash
WHERE: University Hospi-
tal, 1500 East Medical Cen-
ter Drive.
WHEN: Thursday at about
1 p.m.
WHAT: A wallet was stolen
and later recovered with
$110 missing, DPS reported.
Police have no suspects.

Ross patio
WHERE: Ross School of
Business patio, 701 Tappan
Ave.
WHEN: Friday at about 5
p.m.
WHAT: Several skateboard-
ers were reported in the area.
Dog bite victim
treated in ER
WHERE: University Hospi-
tal, 1500 East Medical Cen-
ter Drive.
WHEN: Thursday at about
4:30 p.m.
WHAT: Hospital Security
reported a dog bite victim in
the emergency room.
Dorm fire alarm
sounds again
WHERE: Bursley Hall, 1931
Duffield St.
WHEN: Saturday at 1 p.m.
WHAT: The call was a false
alarm. No smoke or fire was
found at the scene.

World AIDS
Week kickoff
WHAT: A breakfast kickoff
for World AIDS Week, a
series of events and activi-
ties
WHO: Circle K, Planned
Parenthood and a variety of
student groups .
WHEN: Bagels and coffee
will be served today from
8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,
but events will take place
throughout the week.
WHERE: Breakfast will be
served in Angell Hall; visit
http://www.worldaidsweek.
org for more information
Music Masters
cello recital
WHAT: A free performance
of Stravinsky, Callapiccola,
Brown and Brahms on the
cello
WHO: Rackham student
Christopher Wild
WHEN: Today at 8 p.m.
WHERE: E.V. Moore Build-
ing, Britton Recital Hall

Gender issues
support group
WHAT: A meeting to dis-
cuss gender issues
WHO: Gender Explorers,
a group for transgender,
transsexual and gender-
queer people
WHEN: Today from 8 to
9:30 p.m.
WHERE: The Michigan
Union, room 3200
Students present
Cambodia trip
WHAT: A first-hand
account of post-Khmer
Rouge Cambodia
WHO: The Lloyd Hall
Scholars Program
WHEN: Today from 7 p.m.
to 8 p.m.
WHERE: East-West Con-
ference Room, Rackham
Graduate School
CORRECTIONS
Please report any error in
the Daily to corrections@
michigandaily.com.

Registration for the
Winter 2007 term begins
today and will continue
by appointment until Dec.
12. Students can check their
registration appointments on
Wolverine Access. LSA advis-
ers will be available at satellite
locations to answer students'
questions.
Although "Casino
Royale" didn't man-
age to unseat "Happy
Feet" in the domestic box.
office race, the Bond flick is
on pace to become the high-
est-grossing Bond movie ever,
according to Deadline Hol-
lywood. The film has grossed
an estimated $224 million
worldwide and has opened at
number one in 50 countries.
Shoppers spent almost $9
billion on Friday, accord-
ing to estimates by Shop-
perTrak RTC Crop., a Chicago
company thattracks consum-
ers. Black Friday spending was
up 6 percent from last year, the
company reported.

9
e

Teen girl undergoes surgery to
IrPsD Trade Shows
..ba .ertin remove massive facial growth

Integrated Product Development (IPD) Trade Shows
Eight teams. Eight products. Jump into the action by casting your vote!
Online Trade Show
November 22 through November 28, 2006
Location: Online at www.tmi.umich.edu
Each team has created a web page to market their product to YOU!
Check them out starting 11/22, and then use the easy online form to vote.
On-Campus Trade Show
Wednesday, November 29, 2006 from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Location: Tishman Atrium, CSE Building, North Campus
See the actual products and test them out yourself! Catch the competitive
buzz and enjoy some snacks while you cruise around the displays.
The 2006 product class challenge is:
The One-handed Kitchen: A system that facilitates food
preparation by people with the use of just one arm or hand.
Contact TMI at 734.647.1333 or email tmi.info@umich.edu
www.tmi.umich.edu
M lege
ook rader
College Textbooks. Buy for Less, Sell for More.
It's almost too good to be true.
VSen AND NEW WOK.S!
FITRST TWO LIST1NIS f1 R
RE I~R-A- Ra e-ND, 6T lMORE FTZ ULSTI NiS !
SeLL LOcAL-LyAND NO SI-IPPING,
W tT-IR 'yIgNcj QRD S LLI NCj!
TRA1> BOOKS O1IOOKS AS WSLL!
www.MU UCoLLeoeooIzrraer. o0v

Doctors perform four
operations to remove
16-pound tumor
MIAMI (AP) - The 3-year-old
in the photograph had her mother's
nose, big brown eyes and two baby
teeth showing in her wide smile.
But by the time Marlie Casseus
was 14, what she saw in the mirror
bore no resemblance to the girl in
the picture - or any girl. Whatever
was under Marlie's skin looked like
a basketball, or two eggplants. All
that remained of her nose were two
distended nostrils. A single tooth
poked through the stretched mem-
brane of her upper lip. She had one
good eye.
one night last year she stood at
the mirror in her family's home
in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, making
slashing motions with a knife, as if
she wanted to cut the massive defor-
mity out of her face.
Instead, that has been accom-
plished by a team of Miami doctors
who performed four operations to
cut away the 16-pound monster,
replace bone and release the girl
inside.

Dr. Jesus Gomez, the maxillo-
facial surgeon leading the teams
operating on Marlie at Holtz
Children's Hospital, says the mass
that engulfed her face probably
started growing when she was as
young as S.
"She didn't have any mouth. She
didn't have any nose," said Gomez.
He said her condition is a rare
form of polyostotic fibrous dyspla-
sia, a nonhereditary genetic dis-
ease, which affects every bone in
her body, though not to the severity
with which it disfigured her face.
Marlie's mother, Maleine
Antoine, says her daughter never
spoke clearly, and her permanent
teeth weren't appearing, but she
didn't worryuntil Marlie was Sand
she noticed two small bumps on
either side of the girl's nose. Marlie
also was beginning to complain
that her mouth and throat hurt
when she ate.
Haitian doctors could do nothing.
With no advanced medical imag-
ing in the impoverished Caribbean
country, no one could see that the
bumps weren't growing on the bone
- the bumps were the bone balloon-
ing and turningto jelly, riddled with
pockets of liquid and air.

What everyone did see was Marl-
ie's nose stretching into a snout, her
eyes sliding farther apart and her
upper lip pushing out past her chin.
She retreated home for good
when she was 12 and could no lon-
ger speak.
In the summer of 2005, Marlie's
father saw a news broadcast about
Gina Eugene, a Miami woman who
runs a Haitian children's charity
with her twin sister.
Eugene says the father called her
the next day, but only mentioned
"something little" growing on his
daughter's face.
"Somethinglittle"wasa16-pound
mass under Marlie's skin. Her upper
lip protruded like a second forehead,
and the wheezing girl supported her
head with her hands.
"I thought it was an animal with
a human body, or two heads I
didn't know what I was looking at,"
Eugene said.
Her nasal passage blocked, Marlie
breathed and ate through what was
left of her mouth: a single, straw-
thin passage.
To eat, she mashed plantain into
a ball, laid her head on the table
and stuffed the fruit pulp down her
throat with a finger.

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