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November 22, 2006 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-22

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WHEN A MOOSE TRESPASSES
ON UNIVERSITY PROPERTY
NEWS, PAGE 2

TWO-MINUTE DRILL
ICERS HOLD OFF MSU FOR 2-1 VICTORY SPORTS, PAGE 8

WHITNEY DIBO: YOU SHOULD
TALK ABOUT THE MIDEAST
OPINION, PAGE 4

iC i an' atil

Arbor, UMch gan
'U' gets low marks
in accessibility
for poor students

www.michigandaily.com

Wednesday, Noy

006

ByKELLY FRASER
Daily Staff Reporter
The University is fail-
ing to make itself accessible
to low-income students,
according to a new study of
flagship state universities.
The report gave the
University an F in the cat-
egory of low-income student
access.
It averaged a C overall in
the categories of low-income
student access, minority
student access and minority

success. No school earned
an A.
The Education Trust,
which issued the Universi-
ty's report card, is an orga-
nization that researches
achievement disparities
between low-income and
minority students and oth-
ers.
Danette Gerald, who co-
authored the report, said
the goal of the report was to
measure how well a school's
student body reflects the
See U' GRADE, page 7

TOP: Former Michigan coach Bo Schembechler's son, Glenn "Shemy" Schembechler, wipes away a tear at a memorial event yesterday at Michigan Stadium for the legendary cc
died Friday. BOTTOM: Two fans hold up a sign with one of Schembechler's famous sayings.
'Bo will always be here'

REPORT CARD
How the rest of the class did in accessibility for low-income students:
A F

Thousands attend
memorial at
Big House
By ANDY REID and
CHRIS HERRING
Daily Sports Writers
On a crisp fall afternoon
that would have been perfect
for a football game, thousands
of fans gathered inside Michi-
gan Stadium yesterday to
remember legendary Michi-
gan football coach Bo Schem-
bechler, who died Friday at
age 77.
Speakers at the memorial,
held the day after Schem-
bechler's private funeral,
included University President

Mary Sue Coleman, current
football coach Lloyd Carr and
Schembechler's son, Glenn
"Shemy" Schembechler.
Jim Brandstatter, who
played for Schembechler in
the late 1960s and now hosts
the "Michigan Replay" TV
show, officiated the memo-
rial.
Thousands of people came
to the ceremony. Most sat in
front of the press box, but
some were scattered through-
out the massive bowl.
Just like at a football game,
former players and coaches,
family members and others
came onto the field through
the tunnel. Passing under the
"Go Blue" banner. Meanwhile,
the marching band played
"The Victors" several times.

UC-Berkley
U. Wisc.

U.Va.

Other speakers included enzie, former Michigan coach bechler.
Athletic Director Bill Martin, Gary Moeller and former USC Carr recalled going to the
former Alumni Association coach John Robinson. coach for advice on whether
Director Bob Forman, former They told personal stories to accept a job offer while he
Michigan player Reggie McK- from their time with Schem- See BO, page 7

U. Vermont

MUSIC OF THE FUTURE

New Life fights for a new home
How auditorium day and belted out Christian rock lical story of David and Goliath. growth, New Life members are
songs. They raised their hands This scene repeats almost building a new auditorium on
almost wasn't built and tilted their heads skyward. every Sundayin auditoriumthree, Washtenaw Avenue, slated to be
After the performance, the where students sit on weekdays finished in January.
By BRIAN TENGEL lights came on. One student for lectures on subjects like com- But reaching this point hasn't
Daily StaffReporter spoke to the overflow crowd munication and anthropology. been easy.
-- -about receiving signs from God But New Life Church is quickly Hayes is accusing the city of
More than 500 students stood that convinced her to become a outgrowing the auditorium, one religious discrimination against
in a dark auditorium in the Mod- teacher. Later, the group's pastor, of the largest on campus. New Life Church for refusing to
ern Languages Building last Sun- Steve Hayes, spoke about the bib- To accommodate the rapid See NEW LIFE CHURCH, page 7

i
F
r

l
f

When the Rice Krispies
won't stay inyour bowl

Contest asks
students how to
improve campus
ergonomics
By KIRSTY MCNAMARA
Daily StaffReporter
Anyone who has ever been
distressed by the water flow
rate of the drinking foun-
tains on campus or has taken
issue with the concavity of
the cereal bowls in the dorm
cafeterias might appreciate
a recent contest held by the
University's Human Factors

and Ergonomics Society.
The contest served to
uncover the most poorly
designed items and fixtures
at the University by looking
at them from a human per-
spective.
"Whendesigninganobject,
you consider the mechanical,
chemical or electrical com-
ponents, but human factors
include the people in the
equation," said Mike Bauerly,
former president of the ergo-
nomics society.
One entry detailed the
inconvenience of the metal
box that envelops the card
swiper outside of Couzens
Residence Hall, making it

hard to quickly swipe the
card. Another documented
the multicolored mouse pads
in the Duderstadt Center,
which cause the optical mice
to function poorly. Another
entry derided the shape of
the bowls in the campus din-
ing halls.
"The bowls work fine for
viscous occupants such as
applesauce and pudding but
do not hold liquids such as
soup well," the entry said.
"The design flaw with the
bowls is that they are not
concave enough, resulting
in any jostling of the dinner
tray spilling the liquid. The
See ERGONOMICS, page 7

BEST OF THE WORST
The winners of a contest for the worst ergo-
nomic design on campus:
DOORSON THECSB
Mike Rote lamented thecofsnglsdoronteewCmurSine
th new ComputerScience
and Engineering Building.
He said the doors unexpect-
edly open into the crowded
hallways, ratherthan into the
classrooms.
NORTH CAMPUS DIAG
Everett Gu pointed outthatthe Engineering Diag is not
as intelligently designed as the Central Campus Slag.
The Smiled number of pathways onthe North Campus
Diag forces students toltake long detours in orderfto
walk to class, his entry said.
COMPUTERSTATIONS IN THE LEAGUE
Megan Haubert's entry involvedfthe keyboards and com-
puter monitors in the Michigan League. She saidfthey are
inconveniently low, forcing students to hunch uncomfort-
ably low when checking theire-mail accounts and tooling
around onthein Facebook.com profiles.

ArthurHarrison plays a handmade theremin, an electronic musical instrument, on State
Street yesterday. The theremin has a circuit that incorporates his movements, which in turn
changes the pitch and volume.

TODAY'S HI:48
WEATHER LO: 2

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michgandaily.com and let us know.

WE'LL BE BACK MONDAY
The Daily will resume publishing after Thanks-
giving Break. - THE EDITORS

INDEX
ol. CXVII, No. 54 NEWS .......
072006The Michigan Daily S UDO K U...
michigandoily.com D0PINION..

...2 ARTS....
3 CLASSIF
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