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November 20, 2006 - Image 15

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-20

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SPECIAL SECTION
(1I4e Lidi.lgan a&xij
Second Printing www.michigandaily.com Monday, November 20, 2006
BO SCHEMBECHLER |1929-2006
chigan Man

Legendary coach Bo Schembechler with his 1976 Michigan squad. In his 21 years as head coach, he won 194 games and went to 17 bowl games. He was perhaps most famous for his annual battles with Ohio State, which
he kicked off in 1969 with an upset of a Buckeye team led by his former mentor, Woody Hayes.

Fabled coach dead at 77

By ANDREW GROSSMAN to 10 Rose Bowls and compiled a
and MATT SINGER 194-48-5 record.
Daily StaffReporters He collapsed Friday morning in
the studio of WXYZ-TV in South-
Bo Schembechler, the football field while taping a show. He was
coach who grew to embody the pronounced dead fromheart failure
ideal of the Michigan man, died Fri- at Providence Hospital at 11:42 a.m.
day. He was 77. In the 10 years before he became
Before retiring in 1989, he head coach in 1969, Michigan's foot-
became the all-time winningest ball team had won barely half of its
coach in Michigan football history. games.
In 21 years as head coach, Schem- , From the beginning, Schem-
bechler won 13 Big Ten titles, went bechler brought a new fire to the

team.
The night before the Rose
Bowl at the end of his first season,
Schembechler suffered his first
heart attack. He received periodic
updates in his hospital bed about
the game, which Michigan lost to
Southern California.
Schembechler stood on the side-
lines in silence during practice the
next spring. His doctors wouldn't
let him coach.
One afternoon, Jim Betts, a sec-

ond-string quarterback, threw a
pass to halfback Tommy Darden.
Darden's eyes locked onto the
ball, and he ran to catch it. But
Schembechler stood in his way.
Darden crashed into the weakened
coach and knocked him uncon-
scious on the field.
A trainer ran to revive him with
ammonia capsules.
When Schembechler came to, he
stood up, looked at the crowd that
had gathered and repeated one of

his favorite phrases.
"Hot damn,"he said. "That would
have killed an ordinary man."
Schembechler was no ordinary
man.
Those who knew him consistent-
ly described him with one word:
gruff.
Below that prickly exterior, they
said, was one of the most compas-
sionate men they had ever met.
"For being so gruff, the guy loved
See SCHEMBECHLER, page SC

ON DAY BEFORE
THE GAME,
CAMPUS MOURNS

A LEGEND'S CAREER
17 BOWLS, 194 WINS, 21 YEARS
AND SO MUCH MORE
Page 6C

Page 3C

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