100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 2006 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

2A - Wednesday, November 15, 2006

MONDAY:
Ten Spot

TUESDAY:
Arbor Anecdotes

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY:
University Jb Explained

FRIDAY:
Before You Were Here

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com
413 E. Huron St.
Ann ArborMI 48109-1327
www.michigaidaily.com
DONN.L FRESARD ALEXISFLOYD
Editor in Chief Business Manager
734-647-333 C 734-764-050 C
fresard@michigandaily.com floyd@michigandailyrcom

JUST IN VASE

A different kind of coddling
Nurse provides massage therapy for infants

If you've ever been in the hos-
pital, you know it's not a relaxing
experience.
To relieve a little bit of that
stress, one nurse has introduced a
massage therapy program. If you
want a massage and you're out of
diapers, you're out of luck.
Nurse Diane Kremer runs an
infant massage program at the Uni-
versity Hospital. She has headed up
the effort to give babies more expe-
rience with a warm human touch,
something quite different from
the probing and tests they usually
receive in the hospital.
A nurse lugging a massage table
around might be considered an
unusual site in most hospitals, but
not to Kremer's colleagues.
Kremer used to carry one around
to practice her technique on hospi-
talstaffmembersbeforesheapplied
her skills to infants.
"I wanted to find a way to help
with healing myself, colleges and
the babies here, so I started giving

massages to people in the unit,"
Kremer said. "People started learn-
ing what massages are like, and
from there I taught nurses how to
massage their babies. I just wanted
to find a gentler way to deal with
babies."
Seven years ago, Kremer start-
ed the infant massage program,
where she and a certified volunteer
teach parents how to massage their
babies.
Since she launched the program,
Kremer has received positive feed-
back from parents, nurses and doc-
tors. The massages, she said, not
only sooth and relax restless babies,
but also help with their digestion,
reflux and posture.
"For one thing, it helps the
parents understand their infant's
behavior, and how to touch them
in a positive way," Kremer said.
"Parents are very happy they are
learning these techniques so they
can now help their babies, and in
return get more sleep and enjoy

their baby more."
Kremer is also the develop-
mental care coordinator, a new
position in the hospital. In this
capacity, she focuses on infants'
neurological development. Kre-
mer and other staffers observe
various environmental and per-
sonal interactions an infant might
experience while in the intensive
care unit.
"I really enjoy seeing parents
become empowered learning to
take care of their baby," Kremer
said. "I love bringing in innovative
techniques into the hospital."
Kremer's integrated touch ther-
apies have stirred up a lot of atten-
tion in the hospital.
Kremer says that some doctors
are interested in doing research on
touch therapy on troubled infants,
such as those with seizures.
KATIE L. WOODS
- Submit ideas for jobs at the Uni-
versity you'd like to see featured to
news@michigandaily.com.

CONTACT INFORMATION
Newsroom
News Tips
Corrections
Letters to the Editor
Photography Department
Arts Section
Editorial Page
Sports Section
Display Sales
Classified Sales
Online Sales
Finance

sr.iiv@michiganda ily.vcoi
coprrecin irniigordaily.ceon
totpdirri@micirandaiy.care
phorrechigandaily.o
clo,,cpaeyvreichigardaiy.com
onrtsud@m ichigadaly.corr
clifiedrc rricirigarld aily. com

Students find a creative outlet at Artsbreak in the Michigan
Union yesterday. The night's theme was hanging bottle
vases.

CRIME NOTES
Police nab girl
after roommate
narcs her out

625 State St.
WHEN: Monday at about
WHAT: A lunchbox and its
contents were stolen from a
fridge in the basement lock-

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES
Lecture on WHERE: School of Social
Work Building
Israeli conflict Make-A-Wish

WHERE: Mary Markley er room, DPS reported.
Residence Hall, 1503 Wash- -gam
ington Heights ed
WHEN: Monday at about turns court to
3 p.m.
WHAT: A resident of Mary fighting ring
Markley Residence Hall
called the police when she WHERE: Central Campus
found what is believed to be Recreation Building, 401
marijuana in her room, the Washtenaw Ave.
Department of Public Safety WHEN: Yesterday at about
reported. Police arrived and 1 a.m.
arrested the roommate. WHAT: At least four men
were involved in a fight
Thiefpilfers Law that broke out on the bas-
ketball court over a conten-
School lunch tious match, DPS reported.
There were no injuries. The

WHAT: Lecture on require-
ments for a lasting peace
between Israel and Palestine
WHO: Afif Safieh, Palestin-
ian ambassador to the U.S.
WHEN: Today from 4 to
5:30 p.m.
WHERE: Auditorium 3,
Modern Language Building
Film screening
WHAT: Screening of the
film "Cruel and Unusual,"
a movie about transgender
women in the prison sys-
tem
WHO: School of Social
Work
WHEN: Today from 7 to

mass meeting
WHAT: Informational
meeting
WHO: M Stars for the
Make-A-Wish Foundation
WHEN: Today from 8 to
8:45 p.m.
WHERE: Kuenzel room of
the Michigan Union
CORRECTIONS
" A chart on the front page
of yesterday's Daily (By the
numbers) identifying the per-
centage of registered student
voters who voted Tuesday
should have specified that
the figures applied to only
voters ages 18 to 24.
Please report any error in
the Daily to corrections@

The University is barely
winning the blood battle
against Ohio State Univer-
sity. Donate from noon to 6
p.m. in Pierpont Commons and
from 2 to 8 p.m. in the ball-
room of the Michigan Union.
In an effort to control hoo-
liganism after Saturday's
football game, Ohio State
University is holdinga contest
for an all-expense-paid trip to
the National Championship
game. To enter, OSU students
must check in at their dorms at
10 p.m., midnight and 2 a.m.
A 1996 California lawsuit,
similar to the one recently
filed by By Any Means
Necessary, aimed at upholding
the state's affirmative action
programs, was reected in court.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Jeffrey Bloomer Managing Editor bloomer@michigandaily.conr
Karl Stampfl Managing News Editor stampf@michigandaily.con
NEWS EDIT[ORS: Leah Graboski, Christina Hildreth, Anne Soling.Anne VanderMey
Emily Beam Editorial Page Editor beam@michigarndaily.com
ChristopherZbrozek Editorial'PageEditor zbrozek@michigandaihy.com
ASSOCIATE EDITrORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Whitney Dibo. Theresa Kennelly, Imran Syed
Jack Herman Managing1Sports Editor herman@ michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDI'TORS: Scott Bell Hose Bosch,
Giannot to, Ian Robinson, Nate Sandals, Dan Levy
AndrewSargus Klein ManagingArts Editor kleir. 0nichigandaily.conm
Bernie Nguyen Managing Arts Editor nguyen@mnichiganrdaily.comr
ASSOCIATE A RTS EDITOR: Kimberly Chou
A RTS S UB E DIT OR S: Lloyd H. Ca rgo, Caitlin Cowan, Punit Mattoo, Kristin MacDonald
Alex DzIiadosanagi hoto Edior dadosz@michigandaily.com
Mike Hulsebus Managing Photo Editor hulsebus@michigandaily.corn
Bridget O'Donnell Managing Design Editor odonrell@michigandaily.com
ASSISTANT DE SIGN EDITOR: Lisa Gentile
Phil Dokas Managing Online Editor dokas@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ON.INE. EDITOR: Angela Cesere
James V. Dowd Magazine Editor dowd@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE MAGAZINE EDITOR: Chris Gaerig
BUSINESS STAFF
RobertChin Display sales Manager
ASSOCIATE DISPLAY SALES MANAGER: Ben Sehrotenboer
SPE"CIA L S ECT IONS M ANAGE R: David Dal
Kristina Diamantoni classified sales Manager
ASSISTANT CLASSIFIED SALES MiANAGER: Michael Moore
Emily Cipriano Online Sales Manager
Ryan VanTassel Finance Manager
BrittanyOKefe Layou tanager
thelsea iHoard Prodocrion Managcr
TheMichiganDaily(ISsN0745-967)ispublishedMondaythroughFridayduringthe
faland winter termsby studentsat theruniversity ofMichigan.Onecopyisavailable
reeof chargetallreaers.OAdditional coiesmaybe pickedupattheDaily'soffice
ior $2.Subscrpriofrfallern, srarting inSeptemberuiaU.S. nail are $11t.
Winter term I(anuary through Aprillisltyearlong (September through April)
is$195.tUniversity affiliates aresubect toa reduced subscription rate. On-campus
subscriptions forlfalltermareS3s.Subscriptionsmusthbe prepaid.The MichiganDaily
is m bha of ThP As niat~d PS ad ThP Atsniatd Cnll CiatP Prrt

0
0

WHERE: utchin Hall, incident is under investa (9P..aeor n cacre aehsa a aes.
9 ~-michigandaily.com. FR OE SEPAE4
tion.
Iraq is top issue, but most doubt Dems have plan for war
Three out of five surveyed said adjusted to Washington's new division of labor, with has a margin of error of 3 percentage points. Democratic position. Skelton, in line to become chair-
President Bush in the White House and Democrats That finding strikes at the heart of a Democratic man oftheHouseArmed Services Committee, has pro-
Democrats don't have a viable holding the reins of Congress for the first time in 12 dilemma. The party has been of one voice in criticiz- posed withdrawing a U.S. brigade for every three Iraqi

solution in Iraq
WASHINGTON (AP) - More Americans rank Iraq
as the top priority of the new Democratic-controlled
Congress, but nearly three out of five say the party
does not have a plan to deal with the war.
In the aftermath of an anti-Republican wave, the
latest Associated Press-Ipsos poll showed lingering
uncertainty about the country's direction and the abil-
ity of Democrats and President Bush to work together.
Underscoring the country's political divisions, Demo-
crats expressed more confidence and optimism than
Republicans.
The poll was conducted Nov. 10-12 as the public

years.
While voters in Election Day surveys said corrup-
tion and scandal in Congress was one of the most
important factors in their vote, the postelection poll
showed that 37 percent of all adults said the war in
Iraq should be at the top of the congressional agenda
during the next two years. The issue of terrorism, the
second most mentioned priority, was ranked highest
by 15 percent of those polled.
Though voters apparently embraced the Democrat-
ic mantra of changing course in Iraq, a majority of the
public did not detect a clear Democratic blueprint for
ending the war. Fifty-seven percent of all adults in the
AP-Ipsos poll said Democrats do not have a plan for
Iraq; 29 percent said they do. The poll of 1,002 adults

ing President Bushs strategy for the war but has been
more equivocal on how to move in a different direc-
tion.
Democrats such as Sen. John Kerry of Massachu-
setts and Rep. John Murtha of Pennsylvania want
a fixed deadline to pull all troops out of the coun-
try. Other Democrats, including some party leaders,
have voiced support for a staggered withdrawal that
demands greater responsibility from the Iraqis.
The public's perception was reinforced during the
campaign, when President Bush time and again told
voters that the Democrats had little to offer on the
war.
"Everyone agrees that we're going to have to begin
redeployment," Rep. Ike Skelton (D-Mo.) said of the

combat brigades rated fully capable. Skelton opposes
setting a timetable for withdrawal but said at least one
U.S. battalion or brigade should pull out promptly.
"It should send a clear message to the Iraqi govern-
ment, the Iraqi people and the American people that
we're not there to stay," he said.
No doubt, the election results have put Democrats
in something of a box, said Stephen Biddle, a defense
policy expert at the Council of Foreign Relations.
"It's a very, very awkward thing to run a war from
the Congress," he said. "The public wants them to do
something. And they don't wantto go into 2008 and be
accused of being the do-nothing 110th Congress."
In separate interviews, some voters appeared sym-
pathetic.

0

GETTHE
CEASE +
CREDIT CARD

GET T E
LIMITED EDITION
T-SH RT

'5F'

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan