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November 08, 2006 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-08

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Dems ca.pture House

PELOSI TO BE SPEAKER

SENATE COULD GO BLUE

Complete coverage of Congress, including key races and what the shift could mean ... Pages 6-7A
.1.1 rtdiigan BatIl

Ann Arbor, Michigan

www.michigandailycom

Wednesday, November 8, 2006

RESULTS
ROUNDUP
PAGE 2A
U.S. Senate: Incumbent Sen. Debbie Stabe-
now (D) wins with commanding percentage.
University Board of Regents: Democrats
take both open spots, unseating incumbent
Republican David Brandon, who finishes fourth.
How'U'voted: Campus precincts voted 76
against Prop 2, 57 percent for Prop S, 80 per-
cent for Granholm and 78 percent for Stabenow.
PAGE 3A
Proposals: Voters say YES to earmarking
state recreation funding, NO to hunting mourn-
ing doves and YES to limiting eminent domain.
City Council: As expected, a perfect sweep
tor Democrats.
Mayor: Hieftje wins in landslide.
State Senate: Republicans keep control.
State House: Democrats wrest away majority.
Ann Arbor's state representative: Rebekah
Warren (D) rolls over GOP challenger.
Ann Arbor's state senator: Liz Brater (D)
wins handily.
PAGES 6-7A
U.S. Senate: As of 4a.m. today, who controls
the Senate appeared to depend on a likely
recount in Virginia, where Jim Webb (D) leads
George Allen (R) by several thousand votes,
and on who wins in Montana.
U.S. House: Democrats score a resounding
victory in the House, winning 227 seats to the
GOP's191 as of 4 a.m. today, withl7 not yet
called.
Key races: Breakdowns of congressional
results across the country.
PAGE 12A
An historical perspective: The University's
long past as a leader on diversity.
Affirmative action in numbers: A smorgas-
borg of statistics.
SNIPPETS
YOUTH VOTE IN MICH.
Young voters made a strong turnout in
Micbigan yesterday, witb about 3,250 eters
ging to the polls in campus precincts, nearly
twice as many as in 2002.
Young people ages18-29 voted against Pro-
posal 2, with nearly 60 percent voting to keep
affirmative action legal in Michigan. Despite
their efforts, the proposal passed. There was
a similar show of support for incumbent Gov.
Jennifer Granholm, who also won with about
60 percent of the youth vote.
COLEMAN OUT OF TOWN
University President Mary Sue Coleman
was traveling yesterday and was not scheduled
to return until late last night, a University
spokesperson said. She voted in Ann Arbor
yesterday morning.
Coleman did not give any interviews last
night but plans to address the campus at noon
today on the Diag.
MICH. VOTING SNAFUS
The Detroit chapter of the NAACP received
80 complaints last night about voting irregu-
larities statewide, the group said in a press
release. Most of the complaints came from
voters who were not on voting lists and thus
weren't allowed to vote, even though they had
voter registration cards, the group said.
The release said these voters should have
been allowed to cast provisional ballots.
The Associated Press also reported that
tbe NAACP was seeking a federal investigation
intoetwoemenetbegroup said were Repubican
volunteers posing as poll workers and interfer-
ing with voting.
Tbe Micigan Republican Party alsoealleged
problems at tbe yells. Accrding to a GOP
statement, Democratic volunteers were at
pelting places around the state wearingeorange
vests posingas electivn oicials. IeGOPiled
a suit against-the Democratic Party asking for

an injunction to ban the vests.
DOWN THE BALLOT
j Terri Lynn Land retained her position as
secretary of state, beating out Democratic
challenger Carmella Sabaugh.
* Attorney General Mike Cox also held
onto bin job, defeating oonent Amos Wil-
liams.
. Democrats took hold of the State Board of
Education with Casandra Ulbrich and incum-
bent Reginald Turner winning narrow victories.
* 0 Voters elected to keep justices Michael
Cavanagh and Maura Corrigan on the Michi-
gan Supreme Court.
* Kirsten Kelly and Briana Zahra also
kept their jobs on the Michigan Court of
Appeals.
TODAY'S HI: 54
WEATHER LO: 43

AFFIRMAIVE
ot ers passrp 2 As resulaIts trickle in,
by decisive margin 'U. See back age students largely quiet

Prop 2
gets 58
percent w
By WALTER NOWINSKI
Daily StaffReporter=
Michigan voters dealt a firm
blow to the University's affirma-
tive action programs yesterday
voting decisively in favor of Pro-
posal 2, which bans the consider-
ation of race, gender or national
origin in college admissions, hir-
ing and contracting.
University President Mary Sue
Coleman, a vocal opponent of the
proposal, reaffirmed the Uni-
versity's commitment to diver-
sity late last night in a statement
released before the election was
called.
"We defended affirmative
action all the way to the Supreme,
Court because diversity is essen--
tial to our mission as educators,"
Coleman said. "Regardless ofW
what happens with Proposal 2,
the University of Michigan will
remain fully and completely
committed to diversity."
LSA junior Ryan Fantuzzi, co-;
chair of the Washtenaw County
Michigan Civil Rights Initiative, g
the group that campaigned for
the amendment, said he was
overjoyed at the proposal's pas-
sage.
"It is like Christmas," Fan-
tuzzi said. "The government
can't discriminate against people
anymore - and that is a beautiful
thing,"
Not all students were quite so7
jubilant at the news.'
LSA junior Rachel Tanner,
who campaigned against Pro-
posal 2 with Students Supporting TOP BY JEREMY CHO, BOT TOM BY PE TER sCHOTENFELS/Dail
Affirmative Action, resigned her- TOP: School of Business sophomore Arvind Sohoni somberly
selfto efea lat niht. watches Proposal 2 resultsstrickle in at a College Democratss
self to defeat last night. pat hs. BOTTOM A sign urging passersby to vote no
See PROP 2 PASSES, page 12A on the proposal, is left discarded on the Diag late last night.
Good news for 'U' brass:
Proposal 5 defeated

Amix
of relief,
rage and
apathy
By ALEX DZIADOSZ
DailyStaffReporter
By midway through yester-
day afternoon, a steady rain had
already corroded most of the "No
On 2" signs posted throughout
campus.
For some students, the elec-
tion marked the culmination
and release of weeks of intensive
get-out-the-vote and educational
efforts.
For others, it was an intensely
personal moment.
For most, it was another dayof
class.
MORNING
The morning began gray and
quiet.
Two spray-painted "No On 2"
signs were propped against the
Hatcher Graduate Library rail-
ings. "It's not just a black and
white issue," one read.
Canvassing the Diag was a
group of students and outside
activists composed mostly of
members of One United Michi-
gan, the United States Student
Association and the College
Democrats.
Among them, LSA senior
Kristin Purdy was sheltered
from the constant drizzle by a
7-foot donkey suit riddled with
campaign stickers.
The atmosphere among the
activists was tense, she said,
but hopeful that Proposal 2
would fail.
See REACTION, page 12A

WHAT: In the wake of Prop 2, a speech
to the entire campus community
WHO: University President.
Mary Sue Coleman, whose.
defining moment to date
may have been leading the
University through the2003
Supreme Court affirmative
action lawsuits
WHEN: Today at noon
on the Diag
IN CASE OF RAIN:
Event will move into
the Michigan Union
Ballroom

Administrators opposed
changing way education
money is allocated
By KELLY FRASER
Daily StaffReporter
Proposal5, which would have changed
the way the state funds the University
and other public schools, was losing by
a 24-point margin last night as of 4 a.m.
this morning.
The proposal would have mandated
that the state Legislature increase fund-
ing for public schools each year by the
rate of inflation or 5 percent, whichever
is lower.
The amount local school districts have
to pay in pension and health care benefits
would have also been capped under the
proposal. The state would have had to
cover the remaining costs.

SeveralUniversityadministrators have
come out against the proposal
According to the language on the bal-
lot, the proposal would have cost the state
an estimated $565million in its firstyear.
Opponents feared that the proposal
would have forced the Legislature to
raise taxes or cut other programs to fund
it. Some also worried that the initiative
would have tied up too much of the state
budget.
University President Mary Sue Cole-
man opposed the proposal, saying she is
favor of increasing education funding but
that the proposal was simply bad public
policy.
With the proposal's failure, there will
be no change in how the state allocates its
funds to education. State appropriations
for each public university are proposed
and then negotiated in the Legislature at
the beginning of each state budget cycle.
This year, the state granted the Univer-
See PROP5, page 9A

Gov. Jennifer Granholm
celebrates hervictoryo ver
Dick OeVes as the Michi-
gan Democratic Party's
celebration at the Renais-
sance Center in Detroit last
night.
EMMA NCLN-vABvHAMIAN/Daily
Granholm wins a second term

By ANDREW GROSSMAN
Daily StaffReporter
Democrats across Michigan were cele-
brating last night as Gov. Jennifer Granholm
cruised to a second term after facing a tough
challenge from Republican businessman
Dick DeVos.
With 96 percent of precincts reporting at
4 a.m. this morning, Granholm was leading
with 56 percent to DeVos's 42 percent.

In her victory speech in Detroit, Granholm
called for both parties to put the contentious
election behind them and look to the future.
"I'm asking everyone who is watching at
home to join us in putting aside the differ-
ences that came out in this campaign," Gr4-
nholm said. "Two campaigns ended tonight
at 8 o'clock. One Michigan is moving forward
with all of us together."
After conceding, DeVos expressed similar
See GOVERNOR, page 9A

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
news@michgandaily.com and let us know.

COMING THURt lSOAYz
A second day of campus reaction to Prop 2's pass-
ing, including Coleman's historic address. NEWS

INDEX NNEW S..............
Vol. COII, No. 44 NW .
@2006 TheMichigan Daily SU D O K U .......
michigondaily.com OPINIO N..........

..2A ARTS .............................. 5A
..3A CLASSIFIEDS..........A...6A
..4A TIPOFF...............U....1

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