100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 2006 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com
PROP 2
From page 1
ted before Proposal 2 takes effect and one
for those admitted after - he also said he
hopes legal maneuvering might delay the
amendment's implementation until after
the admissions cycle is completed.
Both the University of California and the
University of Texas systems avoided chang-
ing their admissions policies mid-year by
delaying the impact of the new regulations
in the courts.
University spokeswoman Julie Peterson
said earlier this month that she could not
disclose the University's legal strategy in
advance.
Last week, University General Coun-
sel Marvin Krislov confirmed that the
University may ask a judge to grant a stay,
effectively pushing back the proposal's con-
sequences until after this year's admissions
cycle is finished.
Former University President James Dud-
erstadt said he thinks the University should
request a stay, and he is hopeful that a court
would grant one.
"I think a court would be receptive to
(granting a stay)," Duderstadt said. "You
can't make these changes midstream."
Duderstadt was less optimistic about
the long-term health of the University if
Proposal 2 passes. He said Proposition 209,
which banned the use of affirmative action

Tuesday, November 7, 2006 - 7

in California in 1996, has crippled the Uni-
versity of California system's ability to serve
the state.
"I think the Medical School and Law
School will be devastated," Duderstadt
said.
But he added that if the undergraduate
admissions office is creative, it should be
able to preserve some degree of diversity.
The experience of the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkley suggests that maintaining
a diverse student body without affirmative
action policies is a daunting task.
Robert Berdahl, the former chancellor of
the University of California at Berkeley, said
that after Proposition 209 took effect, black
enrollment immediately plummeted.
In 1997, the last year that Berkley was
permitted to consider race in admissions,
there were 525 black students in the fresh-
man class. In the absence of affirmative
action programs the following year, that
number tumbled nearly 60 percent to 213.
"Out of 8,000 students admitted that
year, 300 oflthem gained admission because
of whatever advantage they had as a result
of affirmative action," Berdahl said.
Berdahl called that a small percentage of
the admission pool.
"And yet the cost of 209 - in terms of
social harmony, attitude and hope, and all
those things that are important to sustain-
ing avital society - the cost was enormous,"
Berdahl said.
Berkley developed several schemes to try

to maintain a diverse student body without
explicitly considering race. But Berdahl said
none of the alternative measures worked.
If Proposal 2 passes today, the Univer-
sity will have to stop considering race and
gender in admissions, but it is unclear what
other programs will be affected and how
they will have to be changed.
"We can be certain that there will be
a lot of litigation and arguing over this,"
Peterson said. "It is really going to be hard
to ensure that certain programs are going to
be in compliance."
While University officials said they are
optimistic that they will be able to review
all major University programs and ensure
that they are in compliance by the time the
amendment takes effect, the potential cam-
pus reaction remains unknown.
Last night, University President Mary
Sue Coleman sent a campuswide e-mail
announcing that she will publicly address
the University about the outcome of the
election at noon on Wednesday on the Diag.
In her e-mail, Coleman reiterated her
promise that the University is committed to
maintaining a diverse learning community
regardless of what happens today
Next year's freshman class might be admit-
ted under two separate admissions policies
- one for those admitted before Proposal 2
takes effect and one for those admitted after
- he also said he hopes that legal maneuver-
ing might delay the amendment's implemen-
tation until after the admissions cycle.

Both the University of California and the
University of Texas systems avoided chang-
ing their admissions policies mid-stream by
successfully delaying the impact of the new
regulations in the courts.
University Spokeswoman Julie Peterson
said earlier this month that she could not
disclose the University's legal strategy in
advance. But last week University General
Council Marvin Krislov confirmed that the
University may request a judge to grant a
stay, effectively pushing back Proposal 2's
consequences until after this year's admis-
sions cycle is finished.
Former University President James
Duderstadt said he believes the University
should request a stay and is hopeful that a
court would grant one.
"I think a court would be receptive to
(granting a stay)," Duderstadt said. "You
can't make these changes mid-stream."
Duderstadt was less optimistic about the
long-termhealth of the University ifPropos-
al 2 passes. He said Proposition 209, which
banned the use of affirmative action in Cali-
forniain 1996, has crippled the University of
California's ability to serve the state.
"I think the medical school and law
schools willbe devastated," Duderstadt said.
But he added that if the undergraduate
admissions office is creative, they should be
able to preserve some degree of diversity.
But the experience of the University of
California at Berkley suggests that main-
taining a diverse student body without affir-

mative action policies is a daunting task.
Robert Berdahl, the former chancellor of
U.C. Berkley said after Proposition 209 took
effect, said black enrollment immediately
plummeted after voters approved Prop 209.
In 1997, the last year that Berkley was
permitted to consider race in admissions,
there were 525 black students in the fresh-
man class. In the absence of affirmative
action programs the following year, that
number tumbled nearly 60 percent to 213.
"Out of eight thousand students admit-
ted that year, 300 of them gained admission
because of whatever advantage they had as
a result of affirmative action. I submit that
that is a very small percentage of the admis-
sion pool," Berdahl said. "And yet the cost
of 209 - in terms of social harmony, atti-
tude and hope, and all those things that are
important to sustaining avital society - the
cost was enormous."
Berkley developed several different
schemes to try and maintain a diverse stu-
dent body without explicitly considering
race. But Berdahl said none of the alterna-
tive measures that Berkley developed were
effective in maintaining a diverse student
body.
It is unclear what other University pro-
grams would be affected.
"We can be certain that there will be
a lot of litigation and arguing over this,"
Peterson said. "It is really going to be hard
to ensure thatcertain programs are going to
be in compliance."

I

REGENTS
From page 1
bylaws, a majority of the regents
must support an action for it to
move forward.
A tie would mean the proposal
would fail.
Her decision not to make a deci-
sion is unique in this regents race
among major-party candidates - all
three of her. main opponents have
taken a stance on the suites. Republi-
can candidate Susan Brown said she
supports enclosed seating if it will
benefit the University financially.
"This is not about ducking an

issue," Darlow said. "Obviously,
there could be some political gain
if I took a position, but I don't think
it's right."
But even if Darlow defeats Bran-
don and joins the skybox opponents,
it could already be too late for her to
make a difference.
Last month, Athletic Director
Bill Martin said he hopes to present
the renovation plan to the regents at
their meeting in November.
By the time Darlow would take
office on Jan. 1, the architects would
have started drawing up detailed
architectural schematics.
University spokeswoman Julie
Peterson said it's usually four to

eight months between the time a
design is approved and the time the
a construction company is hired to
work on the project.
Although the board has the
authority to reconsider a previous
decision on a project, Peterson said
she couldn't think of an instance
where it has happened.
The heated debate over stadium
renovations has put the regents in a
tough position, Darlow said.
"Some people are making a deci-
sion a certain way becausecthey have
very strong opinions about how the
stadium should be," Darlow said.
"I don't think that's what a regent
should do."

s
i
t

Do you hove 1-he best leoses on
campus??
Show them in our
i) FALL RALTY PAGE

TURN TO THE DAILY TOMORROW FOR ELECTION
COVERAGE AND WHAT THE RESULTS MEAN FOR YOU.

the michigan daily
PART TIME LEASING agent.
Friendly with people and computers. tIC
Reliable transportation a must. Please
fax resume to 734.663.3641.
PART TIME LEASING AGENT
Friendly with people and computers. SPRING
Reliable transportation a must. 20th Ann
Please Fax resume to 734.663.3641. Free trip
PhDs or CANDIDATES, any field Free Met
Full- & Part-time in small, highly suc- Ever. Gr
cessful biotech company near campus. Spring
Email dawn@eyelabgroup.com 1800-426
or fax 734-665-0569. www.sun
RECREATIONAL GYMNASTICS SPRING
SUPERVISOR. P/T - F/T. Must have Mexico,
experience, a happy face, and love chil- Trips, Ea
dren. Send resume to 810-229-4998. group
800-648-4
SEEKING WOMEN MODELS 25-40
from your home. Digital camera/video. VISIT I
woman-run business. Lingerie, glam- Spring
our, fetish theme. No nudes. Must be breakfast
physically fit. Long term pay. Contract tour &
signed. Project.model@hotmail.com sales
wwt
TUTOR TO HELP 7th grader with .
math and science. Tues. - Thurs. 1.5
hrs/session. Afternoons or evenings,
must have car. $20/hr. 663.2799.
VP FOR COMMUNICATIONS Office
is seeking a native Spanish speaking se-
nior or Grad Student to work 10-15 hrs/ For Ti
wk. Good writing skills a must! Need ARIE
assistance with translations of text from (Marc
English to Spanish, contacting various to make
Latino media outlets, and related tasks. return t
Please send resume to vsh@umich.edu you. Yot
wealth
WOLVERINESNEEDJOBS.COM now.
We need Paid survey takers in Ann TAUR
Arbor. 100% FREE to join. (April
Click on Surveys. This i
to partne
old prob
childcareyou're u
, ing toda
GEMI
(May
095 Talk tc
want to
ADORABLE 1 YR.OLD Needs 5-10 You're
hrswk. childcare in downtown home. fact, you
Exp., Loving, Refs. Fragrance free CANt
household. Call Kate 734-769-1606. (Jane
Tdta.

BREAK 2007 Celebration
iversary w/ Sun Splash Tours.
on every 12 before Nov. 1.
als & Parties, Hottest Deals
oup Discounts on 6+. Hottest
Break Destinations. Call
-7710.
splashtours.com
BREAK W/STS to Jamaica,
Bahamas & Florida. Sell
in Cash, Travel Free! Call for
discounts. Info/Reservations
4849. www.ststravel.com
LONDON ENGLAND 2007
Break! $599/person. Bed and
t, free drinks night, sightseeing
river cruise! 1800-599-8635.
:s@springbreaklondon.com
w.springbreaklondon.com

wf
LIVE IN FEMALE assistant for a
young woman w/ disabilities in A2. No
kids, pets or smkg, 734-429-3215.

AKC FEMALE YORKIE, AKC regis-
tered, very thick Black and Golden
Color with excellent black points eyes.
He comes with health guarantee, up to-
date shots and worming, very lovable
socialized. Vet checked and health cer-
tificate. He will make you a wonderful
pet and companion. 5lbs. grown and
for more info. you can contact me via
email karenintcoltd@yahoo.com

uesday, Nov. 7, 2006
;S
h 21 to April 19)
s a good day to try to get aloan,
other people give you things or
hings they have borrowed from
u can definitely benefit from the
and generosity of others right
;US
20 to May 20)
s a good day to sit down and talk
ers and close friends to clear up
lems. You will succeed because
nusually diplomatic and charm-
ay.
JNI
21 to June 20)
o co-workers about anything you
introduce or achieve on the job.
unusually convincing today. In
u're like the Pied Piper!
CER
21 o July 22)
offers all kinds of possibilities
to express your creative talents!
n flirting, playing with pals and,
ral, doing your thing. Enjoy
events as well. Ol!
23 to Aug. 22)
y discussions will go well today.
n at home if possible. This is also
day to do minor repairs at home
ch up broken relationships in the
O
23 to Sept. 22)
rs, musicians and artists can be
ly productive today. The Muse is
u. Actually, all Virgos can sell,
romote and market anything to
today.
.A
23 to Oct. 22)
an earn extra money today, espe-
f you're involved in making

something or someone look more attrac-
tive. Trust your moneymaking ideas!
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
You can charm the birds out of the
trees today. That's because both Mercury
(speech) and Venus (peace and beauty)
are lined up in your sign. You can't go
wrong!
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22to Dec. 21)
Research will go very well today. You
have an excellent chance at uncovering
secrets and discovering hidden answers.
Work alone or behind the scenes if you
can.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22to Jan. 19)
This is an extremely successful day to
have discussions with groups and
friends. You'll charm everyone! Your
diplomatic skills are honed to perfection
today.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20to Feb. 18)
This is a great day to talk to bosses,
parents and VIPs. Ask for what you
want: You might not get it, but then
again, you might! Why not try?
PISCES
(Feb. 19to March 20)
Many opportunities exist with pub-
lishing, the media and law. You'll be
successful with educational matters.
YOU BORN TODAY You like to
explore many things in life because you
have a curious mind. You often learn
many techniques. Your love of adventure
makes you an entertaining companion.
You guard your privacy. You need chal-
lenges in your life to stay performance-
ready. This year could be one of the most
powerful years of your life. Go after
whatever you want!
Birthdate of Joni Mitchell, singer;
Billy Graham, evangelist; Marie Curie,
scientist.

!ME SOOOOO HUNGRY!!
Want free pizza for a year?
Enter to win and get a sweet deal at
www.banzai.com
U OF M WATCHES
www.collegewatchshop.com.
Officially licensed watches embla-
zoned with the Michigan logo.
All watches priced $29.99 or less and
feature a 3 year warranty.
FREE SHIPPING.
going strong for
one-hundred fifteen years

oaay
for yout
Have fu
in gene
sporting
LEO
(July;
Famil
Entertai
a good d
and pats
family.
VIRG
(Aug.
Writer
extreme
with yo
teach, p
anyone t
LIBR
(Sept.
You c
cially i

2006 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

More men and women on the front lines are surviving life-threatening injuries
than ever before for one reason: We have the most elite nurses in the world. As a
U.S. Air Force nurse, you receive the most advanced training and have access to the
best medical technology on the planet. And whether you're treating Airmen on foreign
soil or their families on bases here in the U.S., you can put all of that training to use.
If you're interested in learning more about a better place to practice medicine, call or
visit us online. 1- 800- 588- 5260 " AIRFORCE.COM/HEALTHCARE

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan