100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 30, 2006 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER, OFFENSE DREARY IN WIN
pd0
lie 1id~ian Bi~

SPORTSMONDAY

www.michigandaily.com

Monday, October 30,2006

'U' employees give thousands to fight MCRI

Filings show rofs and across South University
Avenue from the Law School.
administrators They are University Presi-
dent Mary Sue Coleman and
solidly back Dems her husband, Kenneth Cole-
man.
The Colemans have each
By ANDREW GROSSMAN donated $5,500 to the group,
Daily StaffReporter according to campaign
finance reports released Fri-
Two of the most gener- day by the Secretary of State's
ous individual donors to one office. They were just two of
United Michigan, a group many donors on campus who
opposed to the state ballot gave heavily to One United
proposal to ban some affir- Michigan and Gov. Jennifer
mative action programs, live Granholm, who is facing a
in ahouse directlybehind the challenge from Republican
Hatcher Graduate Library businessman Dick DeVos.
HPV
vaccine Last
was
goesmove
unused the'
UHS vaccinates
only 45 women
against STD
By ARIKIA MILLIKAN
Daily Staff Reporter
Of the 40,000 students at
the University, about half are
women. Scientists say as many
as 80 percent of them will con-
tract the human papilloma virus
at some point in their lives.
A preventative vaccination
for HPV - a virus that can cause
genital warts and certain types
of cancer in women - has been
available at University Health
Services since Oct. 1.
But of the 16,000 women at
the University that HPV is pre-
dicted to affect, as of Oct.19 only
about 45 had been vaccinated at
UHS.
As low as this number may
sound, it towers in comparison
to Michigan State University's
health clinic, which has only
administered about two HPV
vaccines so far, said Susan Ernst,
chief of the UHS gynecology
clinic.
Still, Ernst conceded that
there has not been a great use of
the HPV vaccine and that there
is a great deal of educational
work yet to be done.
"People don't know about this
vaccine and its amazing effects,"
she said.
Transmittedsexuallythrough
skin-to-skin contact, HPV is
screened by using the Pap smear
technique, which detects cervi-
cal abnormalities.
About 10 to 12 percent of the
Pap smears conducted at UHS
show signs of HPV, Ernst said.
While most women clear
the virus on their own and
don't show further abnormali-
ties, some HPV infections are
persistent and require further
examination, as well as the
occasional removal of abnormal
cells, to prevent those cells from General manage
closing almost tw
See HPV, page 7A and South Forest

Only a few University
employees gave to DeVos and
the Michigan Civil Rights
Initiative, the group support-
ing Proposal 2.
Coleman and other Uni-
versity leaders often speak
about the potential nega-
tive impacts of the proposal,
including its effects on cam-
pus diversity and programs
that encourage women to
enter fields such as science
and engineering.
In a September interview,
Coleman said she cannot
explicitly tell people how to
vote on a ballot initiative or

in a race, but she can educate
them about how she thinks
the outcome would affect the
University.
One United Michigan
raised more than $2.5 mil-
lion from July 4 to Oct. 22,
the period covered by the
report. Much of that money
came from corporations
like Ford, Daimler Chrysler,
Greektown Casino and Com-
erica Bank, all of which have.
given at least $150,000 to the
campaign.
Close behind the Colemans
was University Regent Olivia
Maynard (D-Goodrich), who

gave $3,000 to the group. The LOPSIDED GIVING
other seven regents have also
given to candidates around Money donated by University employees who gave more than $100 in
the state. most recent reporting period
Ted Spencer, the Univer-
sity's director of admissions, Gubernatorial race: Proposal 2:
gave $500. $150to
University employees who Michitan Civil
donated more than $100 in a $1,25 to ihtsInitiati
calendar year - the thresh-rDeVos
old above which contributors
have to report their employer
- gave a total of $15,275 to
One United Michigan since$$
July. ran31 ran i
Only one University
employee, Law School Prof.
See DONATIONS, page 7A SoURcE:sECRETARY OF STATE

call at the popular student bar
almost two years ago. After a
only a liquor license stands in
way. The question remains ...

WHEN WILL
MITCH'S
OPEN AGAIN?

By TARYN HARTMAN
Daily StaffReporter
The jukebox is plugged in,
the pool tables are in place
and the televisions are con-
nected to cable. All major
inspections, including those
by the health department,
are complete.
But the floor-to-ceil-
ing windows on the second
floor of 1220 S. University
Ave. remain dark. The grand
reopening of Mitch's Place -
the popular bar that moved
across the street after clos-
ing its doors about two years
ago - is being delayed by a
single piece of paper: a liquor
license.
The bar needs City Coun-
cil's stamp of approval to
transfer its old license from
its prior location at 1301
S. University to the new
address.
Accordingto Jody Thomp-
son, a general manager and
partner, a series of "bizarre
events" within the council

have stalled the reopening.
"They don't seem to care,
and that's what bothers us,"
Thompson said of City Coun-
cil. "We've missed out on a
huge fall."
The bar was originally
scheduled to open in early
September during the week-
end of the football game
against Notre Dame.
Mitch's problems started
back in November 2004,
when property owner First
Martin Corporation, owned
by University Athletic Direc-
tor Bill Martin, decided not
to renew the bar's lease for
the first time since its origi-
nal opening in 1992.
Why First Martin termi-
nated the agreement is still
unknown to Thompson and
Mitch's owner Mitch Savay.
Thompson said he never met
with Martin face-to-face and
was only told that Martin
wanted to take the property
"in a new direction."
When a space across the
See MITCH'S, page 7A

ACROSS THE STREET, A NEW START
Jody Thompson, the bar's general manager, said the biggest difference between
the old bar and its new placejust across the street is that the new building allows
for better atmosphere.
"We're trying to create more of a homeyfeel, and that's easier in this kind of
space," he said.
Thompson hopes that 13 televisions - including three plasma screens above
the bar - will attract more sportsfans.
Mitch's owners are also trying toget wireless internet installed in the new loca-
tion to attract afternoon patrons.

r Jody Thompson stands behind the bar at Mitch's, which its owners expect to open soon after
o years ago. The new location is across the street from its old digs at South University Avenue
Street.

Eight easy steps toward a 4.0

Profs on how
to perfect
your transcript
By CHRISTINE BEAMER
Daily StaffReporter
For many students, get-
ting good grades is an art
- a fly-by-night effort
that involves cram ses-
sions, expert use of Spark
Notes and a sixth sense for
knowing what it takes to
see that A at the end of the
semester.
Professors have the per-
spective to quantify it as a sci-
ence - an enterprise honed by

experimentation, tried-and-
true technique and a career of
observations.
University of Arkansas pro-
fessors Lynn Jacobs and Jere-
my Hyman take that approach
in their new book, "Profes-
sors' Guide to Getting Good
Grades in College."
Along with tips from Uni-
versity of Michigan teachers,
here is their advice:
GO TO OFFICE HOURS
At the very least, this will
make professors less lonely.
"The fact of the matter is
that in large colleges as well
as small ones, professors find.
themselves mostly alone in
office hours," physics Prof.
Gregory Tarle said.

Tarle recommended going
to see professors even when
there is not an upcoming test,
because they love to help stu-
dents learn anytime.
Anthropology Prof. John
Speth agreed, though he cau-
tioned against the overuse of
office hours, suggesting that
professors know the differ-
ence between genuine inter-
est and brown-nosing.
DON'T HIGHLIGHT
Students have a tendency
to highlight and underline
passages they already under-
stand.
"Highlighters are too indis-
criminate - they're a big yel-
low blob," English Prof. John
Whittier-Ferguson said.

Instead, he suggested tak-
ing margin notes, making
topical indexes in the front of
the book or chapter about rel-
evant pages and referencing
other sections of the text in
the margin.
USE SECTION MEETINGS
INTELLIGENTLY
Tarle said section meet-
ings are an ideal place to find
homework partners. Section
gives students a chance to
explain things they under-
stand to other students.
BE CAUTIOUS ABOUT
CHALLENGING GRADES
Jacobs warned that it is
often futile for students to
See GRADES, page 7A

IF YOU'RE STILL
FAILING
Othertips from "Profes-
sors' Guide to Getting Good
Grades":
* Take one page of notesfor
every 15 minutes of lecture.
* Carefully considerstructure
when writing an essay on an
exam sothe grader can easilyfind
the main points.
" Don't suck up toget better
grades. Professors oftenwill
not match a name with a person
when they are grading assign-
ments anyway.
* Don't rush to the library when
you'reassigned a paper-think
of ideas that interest you first

TODAY'S Hi :63
WEATHER LO: 49

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-763-2459 or e-mail
newsomichgandaily.com and let us know.

COMING TUESDAY:
Amid chronic student apathy, campus activist
group rallies against war NEWS

INDEX NEWS.......
Val. cXsIl, No. 3e
9206 he Michigan Daily S U D O K U..
michigandoily.com OtPIN1ON..

..2A ARTS ....................
..3A CLASSIF tDS........
..4A SPORTS................

SA
6A
. . B

i

6

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan