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October 18, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-10-18

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2A-The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 18, 2006

413 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104-1327
www.michigandaily.com
DoNNA . FRESARD ALEXIS FLoYD
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fresard@michigandaily.com business@michigandaily.com

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EDITORIAL STAFF
Jeffrey Bloomer Managing Editor bloomer@michigandaily.com
Karl Stampfl Managing News Editor stampfl@michigandaily.com
NEWS EDITORS: Leah Graboski, Christina Hildreth, Anne Joling, Anne VanderMey
Emily Beam Editorial Page Editor beam@michigandaily.com
Christopher Zbrozek Editorial Page Editor zbrozek@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Whitney Dibo, Theresa Kennelly, David Russell, Iman Syed
Jack Herman Managing Sports Editor herman@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Scott Bell, H. Jose Bosch, Matt Singer, Kevin Wright, Stephanie Wright
SPORTSNIGHTEDITORS:DanBromwich,AmberCovin,MarkGiannotto,Ran Levy,IanRobinson,NateSandals
Andrew Sargus Klein ManagingtArtsEditor klein@michigandaily.com
Bernie NguyenMang tEdor nguyen@michigandaily.com
ASSOC IATE ARTS EDITORS: Kimberly Chou
ARTSSUBEDITORS:UdiICig ,Caitlin( owan,PunitMattoo,KristinMac onak i
Alex Dziadosz Managing Photo Editor dziadosz@michigandaily.com
Mike Hulsebus Managing Photo Editor hulsebus@michigandaily.com
ASSOC ATEPEOTO EDITORS:FoCaseTrevor Campbell, Peter Schotenfels
Bridget O'Donnell Assistant Managing Editor, Design odonnell@michigandaily.com
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR: LisaGentile
Phil Dokas Managing Online Editor dokas@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE ONLINE EDITORS: Angela Cesere
James V. DOWd Matz se Editor dowd@michigandaily.com
ASSOCIATE MAGAZINEREDITOR: CbisGaerig
BUSINESS STAFF
Robert Chin Display Sales Manager
ASSOCIATE DISPLAY SALES MANAGER: Ben Schrotenboer
SPECIAL PROJECT MANAGER: David Dai
Kristina Diamantoni Classified Sales Manager
ASSISTANT ELASSIFIEDSALES MANAGER: Mchal Mooe
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Ryan VanTassel Finance Manager
Brittany O'Keefe Layout Manager
Chelsea Hoard Production Manager
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winterterms
Dy students at the niversity ot MiDig. Ore opy is available free of charge to all readers. bdditioal
copies nay Dr pitked ap at the Daily's otfice tor $2. Subscriptiosotr tall tern, startirg inSepteober, via
U.S. mail are $110. Winter term (January through April) is $115, yearlong (September through Aprl) is
$055.r l iersity atiliates r subject isa reduted subscription rate. On-campus subscriptions forfalltem
are 535.sS useridtiorslg ostbDrprepoid. The Mithitar.Only isoanenber ofTe Associated Press od The
Associated Collegiate Press.

Italian firefighters inspect the wreckage of two
subway trains in a station in central Rome yes-
terday. A subway train slammed into the back of
another that was stopped at a station.
Onek killed,'more
than 100 hurt in
subway crash
Passenger says one of the trains
appeared to miss a stoplight, but
investigators looking into cause
ROME (AP) - A subway train plowed into another that
was stopped in a central Rome station during rush hour
yesterday morning, killing one person and injuring more
than 100 as passengers screamed and ran for the exits.
Some witnesses said the driver of the moving train
appeared to have run a red light. Investigators were trying
to determine the cause of the crash.
Thick, black smoke filled the Piazza Vittorio Emanuele
II subway station, and panicked passengers ran after the
crash, witnesses said. Stunned and bloodied passengers
were led from the station, according to TV video.
"People in my carriage were sprawled all over the floor
crying and screaming;said Kahn Jaris Hassan,a 29-year-
old native of India, who was in the moving train.
"Inside there were many people covered in blood shout-
ing for help, many too injured to walk," Hassan said at San
Giovanni Hospital, where he was waiting for a friend to
be treated.
The prefect's office said that 110 people had been taken
to hospitals, and that five were in serious condition.
The driver of the moving train was trapped in the rub-
ble, but was pulled out alive. Earlier reports said he had
died at the hospital, but that was later denied.
Authorities said the person killed was a 30-year-old Ital-
ian woman. She and the most seriously injured had been in
the last car of the halted train.
Ambulances, firefighters and rescue teams rushed to the
station, near Rome's main railway station. Rescue workers
set up a field hospital nearby, where they treated dozens
of people.
Rescuers worked to untangle the wreckage. The mov-
ing train had pushed 60to 9 feet into the stopped train, said
fire department spokesman Luca Cari.
Passenger Andrew Trovaioli, 38, said one of the trains
appeared to have missed a stop light.
"I saw the red light as the train moved into the station,"
Trovaioli said.

NEWS IN BRIEF
SEOUL, South Korea
N.K. preparing for second nuke test
Satellite images indicate North Korea appears to be getting ready for a second
nuclear test, officials said Tuesday, as the defiant communist regime held huge rallies
and proclaimed that U.N. sanctions amount toa declaration of war.
China, the North's longtime ally and biggest trading partner, warned Pyongyang
not to aggravate tensions in the wake of U.N. condemnation of its Oct. 9 atomic blast.
And U.S. nuclear envoy Christopher Hill told reporters in Seoul that another nuclear
explosion would be "a very belligerent answer" to the world.
As the White House acknowledged that the isolated nation might try a second
test, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice launched a diplomatic drive to persuade
Asian allies and Russia to intensify North Korea's isolation by enforcing sanctions
approved by the U.N. Security Council.
WASHINGTON
U.S. population hits 300 million milestone
The nation's population officially hit 300 million at 7:46 a.m. yesterday,
when the Census Bureau's population clock rolled over to the big number.
But there weren't any wild celebrations, fireworks or any other govern-
ment-sponsored hoopla to mark the milestone. Why bother? Many experts
think the population actually hit 300 million months ago.
"I don't think anybody believes it will be the precise moment when the
population hits 300 million,' Howard Hogan, the Census Bureau's associate
director for demographic programs, said in an interview before the mile-
stone was reached. But, he added, "We're confident that we're somewhat
close."
WASHINGTON
Bush greenlights terror interrogation law
Some of the most notorious names in the war on terror are headed toward
prosecution after President Bush signed a law yesterday authorizing military
trials of terrorism suspects.
The legislation also eliminates some of the rights defendants are usually guaranteed
under U.S. law, and it authorizes continued harsh interrogations of terror suspects.
Imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and awaiting trial are Khalid Sheikh
Mohammed, the accused mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, Ramzi Binalshibh,
an alleged would-be 9/11 hijacker, and Abu Zubaydah, who was believed to be a
link between Osama bin Laden and many al-Qaida cells.
KABUL, Afghanistan
Afghan president: Taliban leader is in Pakistan
Afghan President Hamid Karzai told The Associated Press that Mullah Omar, the
supreme Taliban leader who headed the repressive Islamist regime ousted by U.5.-led
forces five years ago, is hiding in the southeastern Pakistani city of Quetta.
Despite U.S. efforts to ease acrimony betweentwo key anti-terror allies, the Afghan
leader in an interview late Monday also blamed neighboring Pakistan for a surge in
Taliban violence in Afghanistan and demanded President Pervez Musharraf crack
down on militant sanctuaries.
- Compiledfrom Daily wire reports
CORRECTIONS
A story on page 1B of Oct. 9's Daily (Hensick plays hero in victory) misidentified
hockey defenseman Jack Johnson as a freshman. He is a sophomore.
H A story on the front page of Oct. 12's Daily (Ford can't attend dedication) should
not have said that the groundbreaking for Weill Hall was in 1994. It was in 2004.
A story on the front page of Oct. 10's Daily misspelled Prof. Carol Jacobsen's
name. The same story should have said "eighteen of the 20 women who were con-
victed of murder," not "eighteen of the 20 women who murdered their husbands."
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

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Study: Common medications
send 700,000 to ER yearly
CHICAGO (AP) - Harmful first to reveal the nationwide scope
reactions to some of the most widely of the problem. People overf65 faced
used medicines - from insulin to the greatest risks.
a common antibiotic - sent more "This is an important study
than 700,000 Americans to emer- because it reinforces the really
gency rooms each year, landmark substantial risks that there are
government research shows. in everyday use of drugs," said
Accidental overdoses and allergic patient safety specialist Bruce
reactions to prescription drugs were Lambert, a professor at the Uni-
the most frequent cause of serious versity of Illinois at Chicago's

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