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October 13, 2006 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-10-13

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NEWS

ON CAMPUS
b Expert on
breast cancer
to speak
Dr. Susan Love, one of the key
players in the breast cancer aware-
ness movement, will speak on mar-
keting and disease today at 1 p.m.
in the Rackham Auditorium. The
lecture series was named in honor of
breast cancer victim Vivian Shaw.
Prof to delve
into medieval
Arab erotica
Everett Rowson, an associate pro-
fessor of slamic studies at New York
University, will speak on Medieval
Arabic Erotica today at 11 a.m. in
room G333 of Mason Hall. The lec-
ture is sponsored by the Center for
Middle Eastern and North African
Studies.
Can personal
ethics, public
policy mix?
There will be a discussion on
personal ethics and public deci-
sion making today at 2 pm. in the
Annenberg Auditorium of Weill
Hall. Panelists include Nancy Kas-
senbaum, a former U.S. senator
fromKansas and a University alum,
and Alice Rivlin of the Greater
Washington Research Program and
the Brookings Institution.
CRIME
NOTES
Men on crime

SWFPT AWAY

_________________Friday, October 13, 2006 - Thu Michigan Daily - 3
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Nursing sophomore Kimberly Schmidt and LSA junior Rachel Brown blow
for a prank in which balloons are hung all around their neighbor's house.

Detroit opes Tigers'
shie rubs off on city
City officials say The Tigers have a 2-0 advantage accelerated the exodus of middle-
as they head into Game 3 of the class whites to the suburbs and
fans' civility projects American League championship came to define Detroit for the rest
good image series on Friday against the Oak- of the nation.
land Athletics at Comerica Park. Detroit again erupted into
DETROIT (AP) - The Detroit All they need is to win two more chaos in 1984, following the
Tigers brought joy to fans when games, and they'll be back in the Tigers' World Series victory
they won the World Series in 1984, World Series. over the San Diego Padres. Riot-
but a post-victory riot brought "From a national standpoint, it ing left one man dead and doz-
shame to the city. does nothing but help our image ens injured. The iconic image of
Twenty-two years later, the and begins to change the conver- the day was an Associated Press
Tigers are once again competing sation about what people say and photo of a beer-bellied teenager
for baseball glory. This time, civic think about the city of Detroit," from the suburbs holding up a
leaders say the exposure will help said Larry Alexander, president of Tigers pennant in front of a burn-
burnish Detroit's image, instead of the Detroit Metro Convention & ing police car.
giving outsiders another reason to Visitors Bureau. There hasn't been a riot since
knock it. They hope to build on the For decades, that conversation then, but the image of chaos in
success of February's Super Bowl, has been about violence, racial Detroit has become so ingrained
which won widespread praise for tension and an abandoned urban that officials find it necessary to
the city, despite some skeptical core. Riots that left 43 dead in point out when local fans behave
grumblings ahead of the game. 1967 intensified racial divisions, themselves.

a- ... _..._ ., .,_._ ...,_ _.... t,.. _...

spree attempt
break-in Gov hopefuls appear

Four or five men tried to break
into an apartment in the North-
wood IV apartment complex
on North Campus Wednesday
at about 8:30 p.m., the Depart-
ment of Public Safety reported.
The men fled when the resident
asked them what they were doing.
Police located two of the men and
arrested them. The group had
been involved in various incidents
throughout the night on- and off-
campus, including larceny.
Wanted man
found sleeping
in Rackham
A man with several pending
arrest warrants, including one for
retail fraud in Pittsfield Township,
was found sleeping in the East
Lounge of the Rackham Building
Wednesday at about 12:30 p.m.,
DPS reported. He was arrested and
is being held in Pittsfield Township.

together at Detroit event
DeVos, Granholm invigorating Michigan's troubled and away from the economic ste
economy. used in the past.
decry MCRI, agree on DeVos blamed Granholm for "I believe our greatest compe
e else the state's financial difficulties tive value in the state of Michig
and vowed to make immediate is our people. In fact, it's the stu
DETROIT (AP) - Democrat- improvements if he is elected, that's between the ears;' she sai
ic Gov. Jennifer Granholm and promising to do more in his first "I want to make Michigan a hig
Republican challenger Dick DeVos 45 days in office than the governor skilled opportunity state. I wa
agreed that a proposed amend- has accomplished in 45 months. to invest in our human capital
ment to the state constitution that "You like the governor but you order to make us competitive."
would ban some types of affirma- just don't know whether you want The candidates appearedc
tive action programs should be to trust her to run state government stage together, but yesterday
rejected. for another four years;' the Ada event was not a debate. Each ca
But that is where similari- businessman told the audience of didate spoke separately, with Gr
ties ended as the two appeared business professionals and elected nholm going first. The appearan
together yesterday at a meeting of officials. came only two days after thi
the Detroit Economic Club, where Granholm said she has concrete second debate of the campaign
they described their plans for plans to move Michigan forward Grand Rapids.
Husband F~
admits he LJtreate
Lwe AcowAsc ,Mw ox Wedtsc at 8-1Q
lied after BEANER

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HEADAUT ARi A
COBRASTARSHIENVY ONITHE COASTMCNWOMENAND H DRFN

Would-be narc s , e
triggers fruitless

weed search
Someone in Alice Lloyd Resi-
dence Hall caught a pungent whiff
of marijuana smoke Wednesday
at about 8 p.m., DPS reported.
Officers investigated but found no
signs of drug use.
THIS DAY
In 'U' History
Bomb scare
shakes up Grad
October 13, 1982 - Fifty
employees evacuated the Hatcher
Graduate Library yesterday morn-
ing after campus police received a
threat about a bomb in the library's
basement.
The Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment's bomb squad found a suspi-
cious-looking box, but no explosives
were found inside.
At 9 a.m. yesterday, an uniden-
tified man handed a written bomb
threat to a campus police officer. By
the time the officer opened the note
and read it, the man was gone.
The note said that a bomb had
been placed in a box on the east side
of the mail room in the library's
basement.
When police located the box, the
bomb squad was brought in and the
library was evacuated.
Employeeswereallowedtoreturn
to their offices at about 11 a.m.

Man says he
never saw wife kill
their adopted son
LANSING (AP) - A day after
Tim Holland testified his wife
killed their 7-year-old adopted son,
the defense attacked his credibility
yesterday by focusing on numerous
lies he told the police and public.
Under cross-examination at
Lisa Holland's murder trial, Tim
Holland said he never saw her hit
their son in the head with a ham-
mer despite telling that to detec-
tives in January.
He said he never saw Ricky
lying in a pool of blood in their
house and never wanted him to
stay with relatives because of
abuse he suffered at the hands of
his wife - contrary to statements
he previously made to police and
during a recorded phone call with
his mother.
Holland also said he lied when
he told police his wife dumped
Ricky's body in a marshy game
area.
The 37-year-old testified
Wednesday that he returned home
from a quick errand July 1, 2005,
to find Ricky dead in the boy's bed
and his wife screaming she "didn't
mean to do it" He said his wife
told him in December that she had
struck Ricky with a hammer.
Tim Holland, who now says
he disposed of the body, told the
defense yesterday that he never
asked his 33-year-old wife what
she had done to cause the boy's
death.

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