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October 11, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-10-11

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"2A-The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 11, 2006

NATION/WORLD

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EDITORIAL STAFF
Jeffrey Bloomer Managing Editor
Karl Stampfl Managing News Editor
NEWS EDITORS: Leah Graboski, Christina Hildreth, Anne Joling, Anne Van<
Emily Beam Editorial Page Editor
Christopher Zbrozek Editorial Page Editor
ASSOCIATE EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Whitney Dibo, Theresa Kennelly
hack Herman Managing Sports Editor
TENOR SPORTS EDITORS:Sott ell, HJ n os s, MatSingerKevin Wr
aPORTSNIGI IOR:Da Ron15,0, SAmbErCl- , ak annx, an Le,1aan oin
Andrew Sargus Klein Managing ArtsEditor
Bernie Nguyen Managing Arts Editor
ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITORS:Kimberly Chou
ARTSUBEDITORS:LoydLI Ca pCaitnG an, P t Mattoo, Kristin MISadnak
Alex Dziadosz Managing Photo Editor
Mike Hulsebus Managing Photo Editor
ASSOCIATE PHOTOEDITORS: estCaseyTrev orampel Peter Schote
AS-STANT PHOTO EDITORS: Shubra Ohri, Eugene Robertson
Bridget O'Donnell Assistant Managing Editor, Design
ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR: Lisa Gentile
Phil Dokas Managing Online Editor
ASSOCIATE ONLINE EDITORS: Angela Cesere
James V. Dowd Magainr Editor
9.SSOCIATE MAGAZINE EDITORhisLGeri

bloomer@michigandaily.com
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Movin, 10, works on a juice cart in Jammu, India,
Monday. A new Indian federal law will ban children
under the age of 14 in some businesses.
Indian child
labor laws
worry children
New laws restrict ability to earn
money for India's youth, who are
often sole breadwinners
NEW DELHI (AP) - A ban on child labor took effect
yesterday, but at roadside food stalls across New Delhi,
many of the boys and girls who serve glasses of piping
hot tea, wash dishes, mop floors and take out trash were
not celebrating.
The children of India's tens of millions of poor families
are expected to work, and in many cases they are the sole
breadwinners.
"As it is, I barely make enough to survive," said 12-year-
old Dinesh Kumar, who has been doing odd jobs since
coming to New Delhi three years ago from a village inc
eastern India. "This will be a bad blow. I really don't know
what I'll do"
The new law bans hiring children under age 14 as ser-
vants in homes or as workers in restaurants, tea shops,
hotels and spas.
Despite the subcontinent's emerging economic power,
child labor remains widespread in India. Conservative
estimates place the number of children covered by the new
law at 256,000. All told, an estimated 13 million children
work in India, many of them in hazardous industries, such
as glass making, where such labor has long been banned.
Officials say the new law will help take children out of
the workplace and put them in school.
Critics counter that earlier bans in other industries had
little impact - a visit to most carpet-weaving operations,j
for example, reveals dozens of child workers. And the new
measure does little to address the poverty at the root of
India's childlabor problem.j
At one roadside tea shop, the Harish Dhaba, talk
among the child workers focused on the hardships
of the new ban.
"As long as Ican remember I've worked ina restaurant,
washing dishes, cutting vegetables, throwing out the gar-E
bage," said Rama Chandran, a frail-looking 13-year-old as
he cleared dishes from grimy wooden tables in the tiny,I
smoke-filled eatery.

NEWS IN BRIEF
WASHINGTON
Natural gas costs expected to drop
Families using natural gas can expect their heating bills to drop about $119
this winter. Those who heat with oil or electricity are likely to see their bills
rise.
The government issued predictions yesterday based on its forecast of a mild
winter for most of the nation and its assessment of energy supplies and costs as
the nation's oil and natural gas production and refinery output recover from hur-
ricane damage in 2005.
"This is a very different scene than we had a year ago in the wake of hur-
ricanes Katrina and Rita," said Guy Caruso, head of the Energy Information
Administration, the Energy Department's statistical agency.
TEHRAN, Iran
Top leaders: Iran to continue nuclear program
Iran will not retreat from its nuclear program, Tehran's hard-line leaders
said yesterday, one day after North Korea announced it had conducted a nucle-
at weapons test.
"Our policy is clear: Progress, offering transparent logic and insisting on the
rights of the nation without retreat," supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei
said, according to state-run television.
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad also said Iran will continue its nuclear
program, which it says is for peaceful purposes.
"The Iranian nation will continue its path of dignity based on resistance,
wisdom and without fear," Ahmadinejad was quoted as saying.
UNITED NATIONS
China: N. Korea must face 'punitive actions'
North Korea must face "some punitive actions" for testing a nuclear device,
China's U.N. ambassador said yesterday, suggesting that Beijing may be willing to
impose some form of Security Council sanctions against Pyongyang.
China's U.N. Ambassador Wang Guangya told reporters that the council must
give a "firm, constructive, appropriate but prudent response" to North Korea.
"I think there has to be some punitive actions but also I think these actions have
to be appropriate," he said.
Wang spoke before a meeting of the five permanent members of the Security
Council - Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States - plus Japan,
to discuss a U.S.-proposed draft Security Council resolution. It would impose an
array of sanctions, including a ban on imports of military goods and luxury items,
and crack down on illegal financial dealings.
CHEVY CHASE, Md.
Bush calls together school violence experts
President Bush, bemoaning an "incredibly sad" wave of school shoot-
ings, challenged the nation yesterday to turn its remorse into action to keep
kids safe.
"In many ways, I'm sorry we're having this meeting," Bush told a confer-
ence on school safety organized by the White House. "In other ways," he
said, "I know how important it is that we're having this meeting."
Bush called experts together for a meeting in the Maryland suburbs after
shootings at schools in Wisconsin, Colorado and Pennsylvania. In panel
discussions led by members of his Cabinet, speakers said the best response
is basic: get parents, school leaders, students and police to work together.
- Compiledfrom Daily wire reports
CORRECiONS
A box on page5 of yesterday's paper incorrectly gave the day when the Michigan
Theater will screen "Zelig." It will run Oct. 16.
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

BtUSINESS STAFF
Robert Chin Display Sales Manager
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j mily Cipriano Online Sales Manager
Ryan VanTassel Finance Manager
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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms
by students at the University of Michigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional
Oties may be picked up at the Daily's office for $2. Subscriptions for fall term, starting in September, via
U.S. mail are $110. Winterterm (January through April) is $115, yearlong (September through April) is
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talk anytime and never run out of minutes.
Cool phones, state-of-the-art network, and all
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Independents
could tip gov
elections
(AP) - Peter Hutchinson is a
long way from a professional wres-
tler. He looks the part of the former
finance commissioner and school
superintendent that he is, slen-
der with glasses and button-down
shirts. But he's campaigning to
retrace baldheaded Jesse Ventura's
journey into the Minnesota gover-
nor's mansion.
Others are making similar long-
shot runs for office. In Maine, two
candidates from outside the major
parties are attacking the status quo.
InTexas,twoindependentcandidates
are grabbing double-digit support.
"People are really fed up with
politics as usual. They think it's
fundamentally broken," said
Hutchinson, quick with one-lin-
ers and sharp at debates. Voters,
he said, are sick of politicians and
their promises. "What they say to
me is,'They think we're dumb."'
Noneofthese third-party and inde-
pendent candidates seems to have
much chance of winning so far, but
in a handful of gubernatorial races
they're generating enough interest to
potentially tip the election.
Some politicians look at this
year's crop of independent candi-
dates and see dismay with today's
political scene. Others look at the
scant number in the group, and the
relatively paltry support they're
getting, and conclude that voters
see the major parties as a good
option this election cycle.
"Despiteexpresseddissatisfaction
with politicians and the two-party
system in the polls, we don't find a
plethora of third-party candidates
either running or having a chance,"
said L. Sandy Maisel, director of the
Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs
and Civic Engagement at Colby
College in Maine. "And those you
do find are kind of jokes, like Kinky
Friedman (in Texas)."
Friedman might be funny
- he's a musician, comedian and
author - but he's also drawing 14
percent of likely voters, according
to a poll conducted for The Dallas
Morning News. That's almost the
same as Democrat Chris Bell (15
percent) and another independent,
Carole Keeton Strayhorn (18 per-
cent). All hope to unseat GOP Gov.
Rick Perry.

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University Of Michigan
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