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October 10, 2006 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-10-10

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Tuesday, October 10, 2006 CHEERIO! OUR WRITER PLAYS CRICKET ACROSS THE POND ... SPORTS, PAGE 10
News 3 Granholm, DeVos to
square off in debate
Opinion 4 Toby Mitchell on
Arts 5 Ryan Gosling shines D~ssdcpin e £b j uf a I
in 'Half Nelson'
One-hundred-sixteen years of editorialfreedom
www.michiandaily.com Ann Arbor, Michigan Vol. CXVII, No. 26 @2006 The Michigan Daily

OH, THE PLACES WE'LL GO

Mario Manningham snags a catch during Michigan's 31-13
victory over Michigan State University Saturday.
Star wideout
may miss
PSU game

Carr won't
confirm or deny
reported injury to
Manningham
By Scott Bell
Daily Sports Editor
Will Mario Manningham
play?
That's the million-dollar
question swirling around
Ann Arbor after the the
dynamic sophomore wide
receiver suffered an appar-
ent knee injury last Sat-
urday against Michigan
State.
Radio reports early Mon-
day morning began surfac-
ing that the nation's leader
in touchdown receptions
will not play this weekend

against Penn State because
of the injury.
Michigan coach Lloyd
Carr declined to go into
details on the status of his
star wide receiver during
his weekly press confer-
ence yesterday and brushed
off subsequent attempts by
reporters to get him to com-
ment.
"Is he going to play?"
Carr asked following the
first question. "Well, we'll
have to see."
Carr was pressed more
following that response and
was asked whether or not
he expected Manningham
to practice this week.
"I don't have any com-
ment on Mario," Carr said.
"I'm sure you understand,
because I don't know every-
See FOOTBALL, page 9

Many students leave Mich.
due to state's economic woes

By Gabe Nelson
Daily Staff Reporter
Chris Soto, a School of
Engineering alum from Tem-
perance, wanted to stay in
Michigan after he graduated
this past spring.
With his degree in con-
struction engineering and
management, he looked for
a job near home and couldn't
find anything.
Instead, he moved to
Washington, D.C., where he
works as a field engineer for
a contracting company. The
D.C. area has plenty of con-
struction jobs, he said.

Soto said he knows of some
openings in Michigan and
thinks he will eventually be
able to find work back home.
But he said he wants to
spend a few years in Wash-
ington first.
"I was planning on eventu-
ally moving back to Michi-
gan, but the economy will
have to get a little bit better
before I'll do that," Soto said.
Stories like Soto's are
examples of what is called the
state's "brain drain," a term
used to describe the outflow
of many recent college gradu-
ates seeking employment
outside of Michigan. Some

worry the state Legislature
will use this phenomenon as
rationalization to cut higher
education funding.
Some of these graduates
can't find work near home.
Others leave for the glamour
of big cities such as New York
and Chicago.
With the state's unem-
ployment the highest in the
country, many Michiganders
are worried that the most
talented college graduates,
including some recent Uni-
versity alums, are fleeing the
state for greener economic
pastures.
See DRAIN, page 9

GRAPHIC BY BRIDGET O'DONNELL/Daily
BY THE NUMBERS
53
Percentage of recent University
graduates who live in Michigan
77
Percentage of recent in-state Univer-
sity graduates who live in Michigan
SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OFFICE OF BUDGET AND PLANNING STUDY

On campus, wage
change hardly felt

Minimum wage
jumped to $6.95
an hour Oct. 1
By Amanda Markowitz
For the Daily
When the minimum wage
for Michigan workers jumped
to $6.95 an hour on Oct. 1,
few employees on and near
campus were even aware of
the change.
The hike is the result of a

new law that the state Leg-
islature passed last March
under pressure from interest
groups, some of which were
student-led.
Many locally owned busi-
nesses,including Zingerman's
and Shaman Drum Book
Shop, already have starting
wages above $6.95, so the
hike didn't change much for
most student employees.
Some students were not
affected by virtue of their
position: the new minimum

wage does not apply to wait-
ers and waitresses.
Mechanical Engineering
junior Bryan Kobie works
at Borders Books and Music
in downtown Ann Arbor.
Kobie works at the informa-
tion desk and helps customers
locate books throughout the
store. He earns $7.25 an hour,
which is already higher than
the new wage. He was aware
of the increase but said that
Borders employees were not
See WAGE, page 9

WAGE IN BRIEF
Sunday, Oct. 1 was
the first of the three
minimumwage increas-
es that the state Leg-
islature passed last
March, bumping the
minimum wage from
$5.15 to $6.95. On
July 1 of next year it
will increase to $7.15
per hour and on July 1,
2008 it will be raised
to $7.40.
The legislation also
established a mini-
mum wage for work-
ing youths. Employees
under 18 will receive
$5.91 an hour or 85
percent of the new
wage.

People's Food Co-Op employee Cliton Zimmerman stocks produce yesterday afternoon.
Zimmerman said the store had the best minimum pay he could find in the area.
Group rallies for battered
women's clemency

Granholm
rejected petitions
last Spring
By Arikia Millikan
Daily Staff Reporter
LANSING - Eighteen
women from the Univer-
sity were perched atop the
steps of the Capitol Building
Friday, their faces painted
bruised and bloody.
Printed on the backs of
their dull blue prison uni-
forms were words like "sis-
ter," "mother" and "aunt."
They represented victims
of domestic abuse who have

been imprisoned for crimes
against their attackers.
The scene was part of a
rally by the Michigan Bat-
tered Women's Clemency
Project, a women's rights
activist group started by
University professors 15
years ago. The group has
fought to obtain freedom for
20 women, most of whom
are serving life sentences
for injuring or killing their
abusive partners while they
were trying to defend them-
selves from an attack.
Participants of the demon-
stration donned this prison
attire and painted their faces
to convey the message that

while the Michigan legal
system may only see these
women as vicious criminals,
they are much more to their
family and friends.
While the blood on the
demonstrator's faces was
purchased from a costume
store, women such as Linda
Hamilton once sported
authentic hemoglobin cour-
tesy of abusive partners.
After being repeatedly
beaten by her husband, Ham-
ilton finally decided to seek
outside help in 1976 when
she came home from to finds
him raping her 4-year-old
daughter. She sought assis-
See CLEMENCY, page 9

REGISTER TVOTE
TO VOTE IN THE NOV. 7 GENERAL ELECTION, REGISTER
BEFORE 5 P.M TODAY. HERE'S WHERE TO GO AND WHEN:
Mobile Secretary
of State office
When: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: In front of the
Michigan League
What to look for:
State employees near
a 24-foot trailer
Voice Your Vote
When: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: On the Diag
What to look for:
Student volunteers in
blue 'Voice Your Vote' T-
shirts holding clipboards

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