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October 09, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-10-09

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2A-The Michigan Daily - Monday, October 9, 2006

NATION/WORLD

413 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor, MI48104-1327
www.michigandaily.com
DoNN M. FREsARD ALEXIS FLOYD
Editor in Chief Business Manager
fresard@michigandaily.com business@michigandaily.com

NEWS IN BRIEF rN
RICHMOND, Va.
Allen didn't disclose some stock options
For the past five years, Sen. George Allen has failed to tell Congress about stock
rx I options he got for his work as a director of a high-tech company. The Virginia Repub-
lican also asked the Army to help another business that gave him similar options.
Congressional rules require senators to disclose to the Senate all deferred com-
pensation, such as stock options. The rules also urge senators to avoid taking any
AP PHOTO official action that could benefit them financially or appear to do so.
A morgue worker prepares one of the coffins of one of Those requirements exist so the public can police lawmakers for possible con-
two German journalists killed Saturday morning in the flicts of interest, especially involving companies with government business that
northern province of Baghian, in Kabul, Afghanistan. lawmakers can influence.
Allen's stock options date to the period from January 1998 to January 2001
N A T O enief: when Allen was between political jobs and had plunged into the corporate world.

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Associated Collegiate Press.

Afghans may
switch allegiance
to Taliban
Unless their lives improve, 70
percent of Afghanistan citizens
could abandon loyalty to NATO
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) - NATO's top com-
mander in Afghanistan warned yesterday that a major-
ity of Afghans would likely switch their allegiance to
resurgent Taliban militants if their lives show no vis-
ible improvements in the next six months.
Gen. David Richards, a British officer who com-
mands NATO's 32,000 troops here, told The Asso-
ciated Press that he would like to have about 2,500
additional troops to form a reserve battalion to help
speed up reconstruction and development efforts.
He said the south of the country, where NATOj
troops have fought their most intense battles this
year, has been "broadly stabilized," which gives the
alliance an opportunity to launch projects there. If
it doesn't, he estimates about 70 percent of Afghans
could switch their allegiance from NATO to the
Taliban.
"They will say, 'We do not want the Taliban but
then we would rather have that austere and unpleasant
life that that might involve than another five years of
fighting,' Richards said in an interview.
"We have created an opportunity," following the
intense fighting that left over 500 militants dead in
the southern provinces of Kandahar and Helmand, he
said. "If we do not take advantage of this, then you
can pour an additional 10,000 troops next year and
we would not succeed because we would have lost by
then the consent of the people."
NATO extended its security mission last week to
all of Afghanistan, taking command of 12,000 U.S.
troops in the war-battered country's east. The mis-
sion is the biggest ground combat operation in NATO
history and gives Richards command of the largest
number of U.S. troops under a foreign leader since
World War II.

WASHINGTON
GOP lawmakers seek to defend Hastert
Rank-and-file Republicans yesterday sought to mount a public defense of Speak-
er Dennis Hastert over the page sex scandal that threatens their congressional con-
trol one month before the elections.
But a House GOP leader under fire for his handling of-the scandal involving
former Rep. Mark Foley canceled a national broadcast appearance and one Repub-
lican lawmaker said those who participated in a cover-up would have to resign.
"Anybody that hindered this in any kind of way, tried to step in the way of hid-
ing this, covering it up, is going to have to step down. Whoever that is," said Rep.
Tom Davis (R-Va.)
The House ethics committee is investigating the matter. If it finds evidence of a
cover-up, the punishment could range from a mild rebuke in a committee report to
a House vote of censure or expulsion.
BEIJING
China, Japan: North Korean test intolerable
North Korea's main ally, China, joined Japan in sending a strong message yester-
day that a nuclear test by the North "cannot be tolerated," and Pyongyang appeared
to back down from its threat as an important anniversary passed without any sign of
nuclear activity.
The estranged neighbors, holding their first summit in five years, put aside.
their differences over visits by the Japanese prime minister's predecessor to
a Tokyo war shrine to issue a joint warning to North Korea.
MOSCOW
Russia is a dangerous place for journalists
Russia has become a deadly place for journalists who run afoul of government 4
officials or their business and political partners.
Those behind the killings, though, are rarely brought to justice, reinforcing a
sense of impunity that may have encouraged the killers of Anna Politkovskaya, a
fierce critic of the war in Chechnya.
As the European Union and the U.S. demanded a thorough probe into Satur-
day's contract-style killing, there was skepticism that the authorities would ever
uncover the culprits of the latest in a series of killings of journalists in Russia under
President Vladimir Putin, who has been increasingly accused of rolling back post-
Soviet freedoms since coming to power in 2000.
- Compiledfrom Daily wire reports
CORRECTIONS
M A viewpoint on page 4A of Sept. 28's Daily (When will it end?) should not have
implied that accusations against the Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Develop-
ment are baseless. The foundation has been indicted in fenderal court, and individuals
associated with it have been convicted of having financial ties to Hamas.
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

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