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October 03, 2006 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2006-10-03

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2 -The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 3, 2006

413 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104-1327
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JOHN MAKELY / The Sun
Amish men gather across the street from the
schoolhouse yesterday in Nickel Mines, Pa. A milk
truck driver entered a one-room Amish school-
house and killed three girls and then himself.
Gunman kills
3 then self at
Amish school
Milk truck-driver commits
third deadly school shooting in
U.S. in less than a week
NICKEL MINES, Pa. (AP) - A milk truck-driver
carrying two guns, a stack of wood and an old grudge
entered a one-room Amish schoolhouse, let boys and
several adults go, then barricaded himself inside with a
dozen young girls before opening fire on them, killing
three girls and then himself.
It was the third deadly school shooting in less than a
week in the United States, this time in a bucolic stretch
of Lancaster County where horse-drawn buggies carry
plainly dressed Amish along twisting backcountry roads
and where violent crime is virtually nonexistent.
Seven others were taken to hospitals and most of the
victims were shot at point-blank range, authorities said.
The gunman, Charles Carl Roberts IV, is not Amish,
wasn't targeting the Amish and apparently chose the
school because he was bent on killing young girls as a
way of "acting out in revenge for something that hap-
pened 20 years ago,' state police Commissioner Jeffrey
B. Miller said.
A 32-year-old truck driver from the town of Bart, Rob-
erts apparently killed himself, Miller said. He had left
several rambling notes to his wife that Miller said were
"along the lines of suicide notes."
According to investigators, Roberts dropped his chil-
dren off at their school bus stop, then pulled up at the
West Nickel Mines Amish School - which had about 25
to 30 students, ages six to 13 - at around 10 a.m.
Roberts brought with him supplies necessary for a
lengthy siege, including three guns, a stun gun, two
knives, a pile of wood and a bag with 600 rounds
of ammunition, police said. He also had a change of
clothing, toilet paper, bolts and hardware and rolls
of clear tape.
He released about 15 boys, a pregnant woman and
three women with infants, Miller said.
He barred the doors with desks, two-by-fours and two-
by-sixes and used nails, bolts and flexible plastic ties to
help secure them, Miller said.

NEWS IN BRIEF
HEDLNS RO RON TH 'WRL
WASH INGTON
Foley scandal shadows GOP Nov. hopes
In a twist on the old Watergate question, the Republican Party is struggling to
answer: What did GOP leaders know of a congressman's salacious exchanges with
underage male pages and when did they know it?
The truth could determine not only their own political futures but also whether the
party can recover from the scandal surrounding former Republican Rep. Mark Foley
- and manage to remain in power after Nov. 7.
"I don't think this is so much about Foley as it is about the handling of this," Rick
Davis, a Republican strategist, said yesterday as the drama rocked the House GOP five
weeks before midterm elections, much to Democrats' delight.
"The question becomes who's gettin g thrown overboard besides Foley to get this to
go away," said Tony Fabrizio, another GOP consultant.
The six-term Florida congressman resigned abruptly on Friday after the disclosure
that he sent suggestive electronic messages to teenage boys working as House pages.
SHANNON, Ireland
Rice: No memory of CIA warning on Sept. 11
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said she cannot recall then-CIA chief
George Tenet warning her of an impending al-Qaida attack in the United States,
as a new book claims he did two months before the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.
"What I am quite certain of is that I would remember if I was told, as this
account apparently says, that there was about to be an attack in the United
States, and the idea that I would somehow have ignored that I find incompre-
hensible," Rice said.
Rice was President Bush's national security adviser in 2001, when Bob Wood-
ward's book "State of Denial" outlines the July 10 meeting in which Tenet said he
warned Rice. Cofer Black, the CIA's top counterterror officer, was also present.
"I don't know that this meeting took place, but what I really don't know, what
I'm quite certain of, is that it was not a meeting in which I was told there was an
impending attack and I refused to respond," Rice said.
Speaking to reporters en route to Saudi Arabia and other stops in the Middle
East, Rice said she met with Tenet daily at that point, and has no memory of the
wake-up call from Tenet described in the book.
BAGHDAD
Iraqi leader announces plan to unite sects
Iraq's prime minister announced a new plan yesterday aimed at ending the deepen-
ing crisis between Shiite andiSunni parties in his government and uniting them behind
the drive to stop sectarian killings that have bloodied the country for months.
The four-point plan, which emerged after talks between both sides, aims to resolve
disputes by giving every party a voice in how security forces operate against violence
on a neighborhood by neighborhood level.
Local committees will be formed in each Baghdad district - made up of repre-
sentatives of every party, religious and tribal leaders and security officials - to con-
sult on security efforts. A Sunni representative, for example, could raise a complaint
if he feels police are not pursuing a Shiite militia after an attack. A central committee,
also made up of all the parties, will coordinate with the armed forces.
NEW YORK
Two Americans share Nobel Prize in medicine
Two Americans won the Nobel Prize in medicine yesterday for discovering a
way to silence specific genes, a revolutionary finding that scientists are scrambling
to harness for fighting illnesses as diverse as cancer, heart disease and AIDS.
Andrew Fire, 47, of Stanford University, and Craig Mello, 45, of the University
of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, will share the $1.4 million prize.
They were honored remarkably swiftly for work they published together just
eight years ago. It revealed a process called RNA interference, which occurs in
plants, animals and humans. It's important for regulating gene activity and helping
defend against viruses.
- Compiledfrom Daily wire reports
CORRECTIONS
Please report any error in the Daily to corrections@michigandaily.com.

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hulsebus@michigandaily.com

Bridget O'Donnell Assistant Managing Editor, Design odonnell@michigandaily.com

Phil Dokas Managing Online Editor
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James V. Dowd Magazine Editor
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