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September 20, 2006 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2006-09-20

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NEWS

Wednesday, September 20, 2006 - The Michigan Daily - 3A

ON CAMPUS
SGroup to hand.
out information
on eating, health
The Coalition for Action
Regarding Eating and Body
Image Issues will be on the
Diag today from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. to promote awareness of
eating and body image issues on
campus. Members will distrib-
ute information about how to
get involved with CARE events
and campaigns.
Student leaders
to mingle, plan
Student Activities and Leader-
ship will host a Student Organi-
zation Kick-Off workshop today
from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the East
Room of Pierpont Commons.
Student organizations will be
able to network with peer orga-
nizations and with academic
departments.
Social justice
group to hold
mass meeting
Volunteers Involved Every Week
willhold its first mass meeting today
for students interested in social jus-
tice and community service. It will
meet today at 7 p.m. in the basement
of the Edward Ginsberg Center for
Community Service on Hill Street.

CLEANING THE STREETS

State reports first two
West Nile deaths of '06

Twenty-seven nonfatal cases
have been recorded in Michigan
so far this season
DETROIT (AP) - Two Detroit residents died after
being infected with West Nile virus. They the first in the
state killed by the mosquito-borne illness this year, the
Michigan Department of Community Health said yes-
terday.
The victims were a 68-year-old man and a 68-year-old
woman, department spokesman T.J. Bucholz said. He
did not know when they died.
The state has confirmed 29 cases of West Nile virus
this season, Bucholz said. A Muskegon County woman
tested positive for West Nile virus before she died in late
July, but officials later ruled out the virus as the cause of
the 37-year-old woman's death.
"West Nile virus is a tricky illness," Bucholz said. "It's
possible to have West Nile virus and never know you
have it."
Michigan had 62 reported human cases and four

deaths from West Nile in 2005.
West Nile season usually peaks in late August and
doesn't end until November. "We're actually hoping for
an early frost so the mosquito population will havea die-
off," Bucholz said.
Nationally, 1,634 cases of human West Nile virus,
including 52 deaths, were reported to the federal Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention as of Sept. 12. For all
of 2005, there were 3,000 reported cases and 119 deaths
nationwide.
People can cut down on contact with mosquitoes by
wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants, applying
insect repellent containing DEET and regularly draining
standing water to prevent mosquito breeding.
Most people bitten by a West Nile-infected mosquito
show no symptoms. But if they do become sick, symp-
toms typically show from three days to two weeks later.
About one in five people infected with the virus will
have a mild illness with fever, headache and body aches,
sometimes with a skin rash and swollen lymph glands.
Severe cases may result in encephalitis, meningitis or
death.

F
CRIME
NOTES
iPod and wallet
stolen from West
' Quad room
An iPod and a wallet were sto-
len from a room in West Quad
Residence Hall Monday at about
11:30 p.m., the Department of
Public Safety reported. Police
have no suspects.
Witness thwarts
break-in attempt
Three men were trying to
break into the Geddes House on
Oxford Street yesterday at about
4 a.m., DPS reported. Two men
tried to pull the screen out of one
of the windows while another
knocked on the front door. All
three fled when they were spot-
ted by a witness.
T ---Tm

A 20-year Grounds Department employee spends his
nights driving the Green Machine, a new environmentally
friendly street cleaner, around campus to keep the side-
walks and plazas clean.
Ford directtor to
receive $25,000
per work day
John Bond tapped by Ford to be vice chair-
man from 2001 to 2003. Reich-
expected to head up ardt, who was chairman and chief
major restructuring executive of Wells Fargo & Co.,
took on a larger role when Bill
DETROIT (AP) - Ford Motor Ford assumed the chief executive
Co. will pay Director John Bond position in 2001.
$25,000 a day tobe a consultant to Reichardt was a full-time
Chairman William Clay Ford Jr. employee while Bond is not, Hoyt
at a time when the auto maker is said. Bond will advise Ford and
going through a massive restruc- senior management before regu-
turing. larly scheduled board meetings.
Bond's total fees under the con- "Certainly someone with Mr.
sulting deal are capped at $262,500 Bond's experience is helpful in any
every 12 months, according to the financial discussion," Hoyt said.
auto maker's filing Monday with Ford is trying to restore its
the Securities and Exchange Com- core North American opera-
mission. tions to profitability and recently
The company said it expected named a new chief executive and
Bond to act as Chairman Ford's accelerated its "Way Forward"
consultant for about a day and a restructuring plan, which calls
half near each of the seven regu- for job cuts, plant closings and
larly scheduled board meetings it new products.
holds every year. Ford and other U.S. auto mak-
Bond was chief executive and ers have been stung by a continued
chairman at HSBC Holdings PLC loss of market share to foreign
and his international banking rivals and a sales downturn in the
experience "can benefit the com- highly profitable pickup truck and
pany at a critical time:' spokesman sport utility vehicle segments.
Tom Hoyt. Bond also is nonexecu- The auto maker's plan could
tive at Vodafone Group PLC. include asset sales. The auto maker
His role will differ from that of has said the Aston Martin brand is
director Carl Reichardt, who was for sale.

30-year fugitive to be
returned to Michigan
76-year-old man took on false "It just makes you wonder
identity, lived law-abiding life after h.
escaping from psychiatric hospitalh many people
NASHVILLE (AP) - An elderly convict who was that are out there."
a fugitive for more than 30 years told a judge yesterday
that he is willing tobe returned to Michigan, where he - Sue Roach.
was serving time for murder when he escaped from a A relative of the fugitive
prison psychiatric hospital.
Thomas Ball, 76, waived his right to challenge his prove his identity.
extradition, and Judge Dianne Turner ordered him to Ball helped her run several storage facilities around
be returned to Michigan. Michigan authorities have up Nashville and all their pay from such work was made
to 10 days to take custody of Ball, Turner said. out in her name, according to Walton's adult children.
Officials said Ball came to Tennessee soon after They said he avoided talking about his past and claimed
his escape, took on a new identity as Thomas Fry and not to even know his Social Security number.
lived what appears to have been a secretive but law- Jerry Walton and his sister Sue Roach said they were
abiding life in Tennessee. glad to see the end to the mystery of Thomas Ball.
Ball was convicted of fatally stabbing 34-year-old "We'd just assume to see him die in prison, or at
Barbara Jean Eden of Detroit, whose body was found least finish the rest of his sentence," Walton said.
at the city's Strand Hotel on Sept. 3, 1963, according Ball would have been released on parole by 1980 if
to news reports at the time. he hadn't escaped, according to Michigan records.
Ball was sentenced to 20 to 40 years at what is now Roach said she couldn't believe Ball went undiscov-
called the Southern Michigan Correction Facility in ered so many years.
Jackson, Mich., then transferred for treatment in 1976 Roach's mother diedlast year,andBall laterattempt-
to the Center for Forensic Psychiatry in Ypsilanti, ed to use his real identity to get federal assistance.
Mich., where he escaped. That gave authorities the information they needed to
Ball and a woman named Dollie Walton lived capture him, according to the U.S. Marshals Service
together in Tennessee for decades and told acquain- in Grand Rapids.
tances they were married, but her children said the "It just makes you wonder how many people like
two never legally wed - likely because Ball couldn't that are out there," Roach said.

THIS DAY
In 'U' History university unions-
almost as good as
Construction of
dorm held up by -

I

money troubles
September 20, 1977 - Uni-
versity Housing Director John
Feldkamp admitted last week
that more housing is needed, but
n kk of fimk d ains a "majnr

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tUniversity
Unions

t

a iacx l 1unu seM1dI 1d
obstacle" in the construction of
a new housing unit that would
accommodate 500 students.
He also said the demand for
housing for upperclassmen and
graduate students is unlikely to
lessen any time soon.
The proposal housing unit
would be built across the street
from East Quad Residence Hall To play: Complete the grid
on East University Avenue, and
would be the first dormitory and every 3x3 box con
built at the University in almost
10 years. There is no guessinc
Although Feldkamp is not a just use logic to solve.
strong supporter of the new build-
ing, he did say a comfortable
amount of student housing would Difficulty: Easy
be a strong point for interested
applicants in the near future. But 5 3
he added that he was concerned
about a potential drop in the col-
lege-age population over the next
decade.
Doug Steinberg, president of
the University Housing Council, 8
said he fully supports construct---
ing a new facility.
"It would alleviate the crowd-.---- --
ing that takes place and take
pressure off the fight for off
campus housing," he said.
He added that it is especially
important for upperclassmen
"because they are always thrown
out of the dorms."
Feldkamp said his main con-
cerns were the possible financial Puzle by s4
complications involved with the
loans necessary for construction.

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